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Full text of "Inglenook, The (1905)"

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Accession A/b. Jj498 

Auihor_ 

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J189.65 

Accession N0.//.T.W.P Call No...dl.5./— 

«^0/. 7 

Bethany Theological Library 



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Chicago, III. 



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THEOLOGICAL LlbuArt> 

CMICACKJ, \LU 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 




PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



POEM. 

" WE'LL UNDERSTAND. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

A CRUISE ON THE MEDITERRANEAN.— Chapter III.— 
By D. L. Miller. 

STATE REFORMATORY SERVICES.— By S. W. Garber. 

HIS CONSCIENCE.— By J. Grant Figley. • . 

OUR ALPHABET OF GREAT MEN.— By Olive Miller. 

SAVING VOLTAGE.— By Henry B. Bixler." 
^^CHARITY.— By Lavina Kaley. 
«^ARDINESS.— By Anna G. Obrecht. 

IRRIGATION'S PART ik THE WORLD'S FAIR.— By Guy' 
E. Mitchell. *■; 

t ENJOYMENTS.— By Grace. Longanecker. 

EDITORIALS. 

MARRIAGE LICENSE. MONUMENTS. ,. 

INCONSISTEMCY. 



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^LGIN. ILLINOIS ^' 



luary 3,^1905 



BRETHREN "PUBLISH I NX} HOUSE 



r^Year 



Number 1, Volume VH 



■*,,- 



T>v 



^K. 



X 



X 



30,000 ACRES 



i 



AR£2i 



ia TO 



IRRIQATED 



Government Land 

In Nevada 

NOW OPEN FOR 

HOMESTEAD 



UNDER THE NEW 

IRRIGATION LAW 

The United States Qovern- 
ment Constructs the Canals, 
Reservoirs and Lateral Ditch- 
es to the Land, and Maintains 
them for lo Year« at a cost of 

ONLY $2.50 AN ACRE 

PEB T£AB. 

This Includes Water. After lo Years Water 
and Canals Belong to Homesteader. 



Laad Close to Railroad and Good 
Markets Can be Secured By 

ACTUAL SETTLERS 
ONLY. 



Mr. L. H. Taylor, the United States 
Eagineer in charge of work, says: 
" It is likely that most of those set- 
tlers who desire, can find employment 
for themselves and teams on the ca- 
nals during at least a part of their 
spare time for the next two or three 
years." 



For Information Write to 

GEO. L. McDONAUGH, 

COLONIZATION AGENT 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Omaha, Neb. 



CALIFORNIA/WASHINGTON, 
OREGON, IDAfiO 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

Union Pacific Railroad 



Daily Tonrist Car Line 

bETWEEN 

Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, 
Idaho, Oregon, Washington and 
California Points. ^ 



Stop Off at Reno, Nevada, 

And Investigate the Irrigated Govern- 
ment Land. Call on M r. L. H. Taylor 
U. S. Engineer, for information. 



For Rates Address 
Undersigned. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

— Is Known As — 

"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from 
Chicago and the Missouri River to 
all principal points West. Business 
men and others can save many 
hours via this line. Call on or ad- 
dress a postal card to your nearest 
ticket agent, or Geo. L. McDon- 
augh, Co!onizath>n Agent, Omaha. 
Nebr. 

E. L': LOMAX, Q. P. & T. A., 
Onaaha, Nebraska. 



Join Excursion 

(To Sterling, Colorado,) 



South 



Platte 



Valley 



.-■£■ 



AND RETURN 

First and Third Tuesday 
Each Month 

Where you virill see thousands of 
stacks of hay, thousands of fat cattle, 
thousands of fat sheep, thousands of 
acres of irrigated land that can be 
bought at from $25.00 to $45.00 per 
acre. 

Only 24 hours' run to Chicago; o- 
12 hours' run to the Missouri River; 
only 4 hours'^ run to Denver. The on- 
ly country'that can make a good 
showing to the homeseeker in mid- 
winter. Go and see for yourself — it 
need only take four or five days' time 
and you will be well repaid by whatl 
you see. Buy your ticket over 

The Union Pacifid 
Railroad I 

Which is known as "The Over 
land Route," and is the only direct 
line from Chicago and the Missouri! 
River to all principal points West.: 
Business men and others can save; 
many hours via this line. Call on or ! 
address a postal to your nearest ticket' 
agent, or GEO. L. McDONAUGH,! 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Nebr. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebr. 



THE INQL-ENOOK. 



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^^♦tJM$>^HJ»^>*^M$M^^^« »^« >^« t^« l^f^^^JH^^^^^j^^f^H^ 






Now is the time to renew your Subscription for the INGLENOOK. If 
you have not already done so, hand your subscription to one of our regular 
appointed agents. If it is not convenient for you to do this send your sub- 
scription direct to us. 

The INGLENOOK for the coming year promises to be the best of its 
history. 

We have several very interesting serials promised written by authors 
of more than ordinary ability. As the Inglenook family already know, Bro. 
D. L. Miller will write a series of articles on " Kodak and Pencil South of 
the Elquator." This is a territory which our periodicals have never had the 
privilege of presenting to the public and the articles will be intensely inter- 
esting since they are to be copiously illustrated from Brother Miller's own 
camera. Essays will be solicited during the year that will deal directly with 
the interests of the young and rising generation. The editorial department 
will be aimed directly at the issues of the day without any disposition what- 
ever to dodge them. Our current news department will be prepared with 
the busy man in view, knowing that his time is valuable, and assist him very 
much in keeping him in touch with current events. Since the wants and needs 
of the home are more or less neglected a strong effort will be made to make 
the Home Department a useful medium. The Christian Workers' and Reading 
Circle Topics will take the place of Nature Study as a result of a popular vote 
of the Nook family. The Q & A Department of course will be what you 
make it. 



New Names 



We have added almost 2,000 new names to our list in the last few months. 
Many new ones are now being added daily. We are pleased to be able to 
report so favorably. We believe further that merit is the only sure foundation 
on which to build, and we attribute to this the wonderful growth of the Ingle- 
nook these last few months. 

The features that have made so many new friends for us ought to keep 
all old ones. We do not believe that there is one of our old subscribers that 
will want to do without the Inglenook the coming year. We are sure we 
would dislike very much to lose one of our readers. We intend to make the 
paper so interesting and instructive the coming year that you cannot afford 
to be without it. 

The Farmers Voice 

The Farmers Voice is a first class farm paper now being published at 
this office. It is one of the best papers of its kind published. The subscrip- 
tion price is 60 cents per year. In order to accommodate our many farmer 
friends we have made special arrangements with the publishers, so that we 
can furnish the paper to you the coming year for only 25 cents. That is, 
send us $1.25 and we will renew your Inglenook for another year and send 
you the Farmers Voice for one year. We promise you that the Voice will 
not be sent you longer than the year, unless you renew. This is an excellent 
opportunity to secure a good farm journal at a small cost. 



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Remedies FREE. 
Send for descriptive list and make your 
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able business. 

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Our latest and finest remedy for 
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which removes the uric acid from the 
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VICTOR MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, 

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The HOME GEM WASHER 

AGENTS can make from 
$5oo.oo to §1,000.00 in 
one year selling this ma- 
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Address, Wm. S. Miller, 
Meyersdale, Pa. 

52tl3Heotton the INGLENOOK when wntlog. 

U/AUTCn '^^" ^"'^ ^'^^ '•° work by 
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with no children preferred. Man must 
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housework for widower and two children. 
Recommendations required. Good 
wages to right parties. Write to 

ASA B. GULP, Eureka, III. 



Our New 

Book and Bible 
catalogue 

is Yours for the 
Asking 

Brethren Publishing Honse 

Elgin, Illinois. 



Getting strong, gathering flesh and regaining 
nature's healthy glow of countenance is the re- 
ward that comes to the sick and feeble from 
using 

Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer 

That sterling, root and herb-remedy. The success 
of the BLOOD VITALIZER is the talk of whole 
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sentiments expressed by Mrs. N. Vreedvold, of 
Grandville, Mich. She says: 

" We could not get along without the BLOOD 
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Such is the testimony, in a thousand varied 
forms, which reaches the proprietor of DR 
PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER in each day's mail. 

DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 

112-114 5outh Hoyne Ave. CHICAQO, ILL. 



THE INQL-ENOOK. 



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;* Elizabeth D. Rosenberger, replete with an ex- 
V, position which will be exceedingly interesting to all 
CHRISTIAN WORKERS on "account of its com- 
^ pleteness and convenience. 

SPECIAL REDUCED PRICES TO SUNDAY SCHOOLS 



AND CHRISTIAN WORKERS' SOCIETIES. 



1 1 I 



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dress, we will furnish the INGLENOOK for 20c per copy per 
quarter. 

A large number of schools are already using the INGLENOOK 
for the advanced scholars. Here is an opportunity to introduce the 
INGLENOOK in your school or Christian Workers' meeting. 
Nothing better could be secured for the young people. Address, 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, III. 



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Weak Stomach 
Indigestion 
Dyspepsia 

To any suflFerer of the above named 
diseases will be sent a 30 days Treat- 
ment of BRAWNTAWNS (50 cents) 
on the following conditions: Use ac- 
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er each meal and one before retiring 
for 30 days, and if you can truthfully 
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use of BRAWNTAWNS , your mon- 
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Victor Remedies Company^ 

FREDERICK, MD. 

FREE SAMPLE 

Sendletterorpostal for free SAMPLE 

HIIDOO TOBACCO HABIT GDRE 

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for BOc, or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
harmless. Address llllford Drug Co., MUfonl, 
Indiana. We answer all letters. 

37tl ^ Mention the INGLENOOK when writini. 

GOSPEL SONGS and HYMNS 

No. I. 

Has a wonderful sale, and the book 
still LIVES. We are receiving or- 
ders daily for this book and have 
sold more than 40,000 copies since it 
has been published. There is only 
one reason for this. It is simply be- 
cause 

THE SONGS AND HYMNS IT 
CONTAINS STILL LIVE. 

This book is used by thousands in 
the Sunday school, young people's 
meeting and general song service. It 
contains 208 pages and sells at 30 
cents each, or four for $1. Send 
your orders to 

BRETHBEN WBIilSSIXia HOUSE, 
Eltrin, minois. 




I Irrigated Crops Never Fail I 



■^ 



IDAHO 



is the best-watered arid State in America. Brethren are moving there because hot ^ 

winds, destructive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- ^ 

mate it makes life bright and worth living. ' & 

We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a ^ 

change for the general improvement in your condition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on ^! 

account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise ^ 

and sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions to an- ^ 

swer and many conditions to investigate. 5'- 

^. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad ^', 

fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. ^" 

^; 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see f^ 

for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. ^! 



100,000 Acres Now Open for Settlement at 
Twin Falls, Idaho, under the Carey Act. 



Unlimited supply of water for irrigation and for power. A grand opportunity for the Home- 
seeker who locates on these lands. 10 years time given for payment for land and water after lands 
are sold. Th*- canals and water belong to the settlers who will own and control the same. 



Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. Fine 5! 
Grazing: Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. S; 



Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 
Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 
to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 
or March the yield would have been much larger. 

Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 
oats. 

Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 
the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 

D. E. BURLEfy, 
S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

J. K HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Mention the INGLGNOOK when writlBa. iOtl3 



Vol. VII. 



January 3, 1905. 



No. 1. 



WE'LL UNDERSTAND. 



Not now, but in the coming j'ears, 

It may be in the better land, 
We'll read the meaning of our tears, 

And there, some time, we'll understand. 

We'll catch the broken thread again. 
And finish what we here began; 

Heav'n will mysteries explain, 
And then, ah then, we'll understand. 

We'll know why clouds, instead of sun, 
Were over many a cherished plan; 

Why song has ceased when scarce begun; 
'Tis there, some time, we'll understand. 

Why what we long for most of all. 

Eludes so oft our eager hand; 
Why hopes were crushed and castles fall, 

Up there, some time, we'll understand. 

God knows the way, he holds the key. 
He guides us with unerring hand; 

Some time with tearless eyes we'll see; 
Yes, there, up there, we'll understand. 

Then trust in God through all thy days; 

Fear not, for he doth hold thy hand; 
Though dark thy way, still sing and praise; 

Some time, some time, we'll understand. 

* ♦> * 
SNAPSHOTS. 



Trtie Christianity needs no press agent. 

* 
The nian who truly loves God never hates anybody. 

Judge not thy friend tintil thou standest in his place. 

Toe the devil's line and you must march to his time. 

* 
Men are like pins — no good when they lose their 
heads. 

Nothing is more unpractical than the neglect of the 
spiritual. 

When you want to get help from God, reach up. 
When you want to help somebody else, reach down. 



Gingerbread on the steeple will not feed the people. 

Speak not but what will benefit others; avoid tri- 
fling conversation. — Franklin. 

* 

We love to boast of our infirmities, but we dislike 
to have others mention them. 

How many could be m,ade happy with the blessings 
which are recklessly throztm aiway. 

* 

Only he who lives a life of his own, can help the 
lives of other men. — Phillips Brooks. 

Some -men are like phonographs, they talk a great 
deal, but never say anything original. 

If men were built like pianos, there would be more 
square and upright people in this zvorld. 

* 

The man who drops a penny on the contribution 
plate and expects a golden cro'wn, has faith to burn. 

It's harder for a man to slip upstairs at tivo A. M. 
than it is for him to slip down after he gets half zvay 
up. 

// a man has the right stuff in him, it's bound to 
come out. That's what makes some men's noses so 
red. 

* 

The Bible tells us that after creating man, God 
rested; but since creating woman, neither God nor man 
has been able to rest. 

* 

It is rather inconsistent for a minister to admonish 
his congregation to zvatch and pray, and then proceed 
to preach them to sleep. 

* 

The man who gets up in meeting on Sunday and 
tells his brethren za/hat a zmcked old sinner he is, usually 
spends the other six days in proving the assertion. 



- 2 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



THE CRUISE ON THE MEDITERRANEAN. 



BY D. L. MILLER. 



Chapter III. 

At Constantinople we separated from our English 
friends of the " Argonaut," they to continue their voy- 
age to the Black Sea, the Crimea and Sebastapol, the 
scene of the remarkable siege in the war between Rus- 
sia on the one side and Turkey, England and France 
on the other ; and we to go on our way down to Jaffa 
by the sea. The fiftieth anniversary of the charge of 
the Light Brigade, made famous by Tennyson's poem, 
occurred October 25th, and the " Argonaut " was to 
reach the place in time for the passengers to take part 
in the semi-centennial of that event. On the 24th day 
of October, 1854, through a misinterpretation of 
an order, and the blunder on the part of some one in 
authority, the British Light Brigade, composed of 
scarce seven hundred horsemen, rode down into the 
jaws of death. The officer in command at first refused 
to sacrifice his men, but when the order was repeated 
he led them in a dashing charge against the Russian 
batteries at Balaklava. When the charge was over the 
mounted strength of the Brigade was 195. The rest 
lay dead and wounded in the valley of death. All be- 
cause the precepts of the Prince of Peace had been vio- 
lated, and in the violation someone made a terrible 
blunder. 

We secured passage on the French steamer " Ore- 




BRIDGE AND MOSQUE, CONSTANTINOPLE. 

noque," bound for Beirut, and while our quarters were 
less cleanly and comfortable than on the Steam Yacht, 
we had no occasion to complain. The French boats 
are old but are the largest and best ships on the Great 
Sea, at least this can be said of some of them. Recent- 
ly the Italians have added some very comfortable boats 
to their line, and now one may have choice of French, 
German, English, Russian, Italian and Turkish steam- 
ers reaching most of the ports of the Levant. 

The evening of October 21st we shipped anchor and 
quietly, without a single regret, pulled away from the 



City of the Sultan. A few hours previous we had 
an interesting and at the same time most provoking 
experience. In changing boats we had placed all our 
belongings in the " Argonaut's " steam launch and our 
party was taken to the landing only a few steps from 
the French steamer. Notwithstanding the fact that 
we were going directly on board, the dock officials, in 
hope of a bribe, insisted on having us open our trunks 
and grips. After going through a number of them and 
finding they had nothing but their pains for their trou- 
ble they got even with us by making extra charges 
to the amount of 150 piasters (a piaster is about five 




GENERAL VIEW OF BEIRUT. 

cents of our money in value), and then after examining 
our passport amidst the greatest possible noise and 
confusion and the least possible order we gladly es- 
caped and found ourselves safe on board the ship. 
By the time we got through some of our party were 
exceedingly nervous and this was not the occasion of 
any surprise for it was a most trying and anno3"ing 
experience. 

As we most gladly sailed away from the old city 
the shades of evening enveloped land and sea with a 
veil of twilight at first, and then the curtain of night 
cast its sable folds about the city and hid it from view. 
But from the gently sloping hillsides, bordering the 
Golden Horn, came the flashing lights of the great 
town. Yes ! " Stamboul is beautiful to look upon — 
from the ship," I said, and turning away lost sight 
of the capital of Mohammedanism, I hope forever. 

In the early hours of the next morning we passed 
the formidable looking but harmless Turkish fleet, a fit 
symbol of the Sultan's power let us hope, and the 
frowning guns of the fortifications that guard the 
Dardanelles, the plain of Troy with its classical as well 
as the more modern memories as the life and work of 
the Apostle to the Gentiles came in close touch with it, 
and threading our way among the numerous thickly 
populated islands of the ^gean sea, one among the 
picturesque bodies of water in the world, we cast anch- 
or the same afternoon in the beautiful harbor of Smyr- 
na. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



As compared with Constantinople, Smyrna may he 
called a very clean city, and yet when compared with 
many of the cities and towns of Europe it has nothing 
to boast of. But it is a relief to come here after vis- 
iting the capital of Turkey. Our stay was much too 
short, for we had but three hours ashore. It was mv 
purpose, had not our plans been thwarted by the strike, 
to have remained here several days while the boat we 
should have arrived on made the round trip to Con- 
stantinople. But as is known our plans miscarried 
and we arrived some ten davs late. Our friends had 










HARBOR OF BEIRUT. 

been notified of our earlier arrival and no opportunity 
offered to apprise them of the delay. Much to our 
regret we failed to meet those we very much desired to 
see,- among whom were the families of our missionary, 
Dr. Yeremian, and Bro. Chirighotis now in college 
at Mount Morris, 111. I went ashore and while wait- 
ing a moment at the post office for mail met Elder 
Fercken's cousin with whom I was well acquainted. 
I also met Mr. Phaedros, son of my old guide, now 
dead, who accompanied Elder Lahman and myself on 
our visit to the Seven Churches of Asia in 1893, and 
Mr. Langdon, who rendered me- most valuable assist- 
ance five years ago. 

Smyrna is easily the first city in Turkey so far as 
trade and commerce are concerned. It has special 
interest to the Bible student because it was the site 
of one of the seven churches of Asia ; its first bishop, 
Polycarp, a disciple, of the beloved apostle John, was 
burned at the stake in the streets of the city A. D. 155 
and the spot where the martyr died is pointed out to 
travelers to-day. The facts concerning the death of 
the good bishop are well established, but there may be 
some doubt as to the exact place where he suffered 
death in this most cruel manner. 

The trade of the city is much larger than that of 
Constantinople, and it is the chief market in the East 
for figs, raisins, opium, carpets, rugs, wool and lic- 
orice root. It has the distinction of being the largest 
fig market in the world and is far ahead of any other 



town in the exportation of licorice root. The root is 
indigenous to the soil and is found in large quantities 
in the valleys in the neighborhood of Alaschier, the 
ancient Philadelphia, and at Laodicea. Large num- 
bers of peasants are engaged in digging the root, and 
large fortunes have been made in handling it. 

In the season trains of camels arrive daily laden with 
bales of carpets and rugs from the interior, hundreds 
of miles distant, with great sacks of figs and opium, 
and bundles of licorice root, and the business streets 
present a lively appearance in the busy season. Some 
of the finest rugs in the world are to be purchased in 
Smyrna, but are made in the interior. The city has 
a population of more than a quarter of a million souls, 
and it is stated that more than 20,000 men, wom- 
en and children in the city and surrounding country 
are engaged in the manufacture of carpets and rugs 
at an average daily earning Of twenty cents. Many 
of the workmen are skilled laborers and artists 
in their way, and produce rugs which command very 
high prices in the retail markets of the world. 

Among the passengers on the Orenoque was a Turk- 
ish official with his wives, children, mother-in-law and 
a beautiful Circassian lady on their way to Beirut, 
where the girl was to marry the son of the governor 
of that part of Syria. The Turk was a fine-looking 
man with pleasing face, a kindly eye and a smile for 
all his friends. He seemed devoted to his wives and 
children, and would have been the last man to have 
been suspected of ferocity, but I am told that in time of 
massacre the mildest faced Turk is the most brutal 
and ferocious. A remarkable departure from the cus- 
toms of the past was noticeable in this party of Mos- 
lems. The ladies appeared on deck and in the dining 




JAFFA BY THE SEA. 

room with unveiled faces. This is such an unusual 
innovation and departure from a custom prevailing 
long before Rebecca covered her face when Isaac came 
to meet her that it attracted general attention. The 
progressive party in Turkey favor unveiling the face, 
thus freeing the women from the slavery of an ancient 
custom, but it is looked upon by the orthodox as a 
shameful departure from the ways of the mothers. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



" Behold !" they say, " our mothers wore the veil all 
the days of their lives ; no stranger ever looked upon 
them uncovered, and who are we that we should de- 
part from the ways of our fathers and mothers ! Allah 
is good and great and also just, and he will punish 
these shameless ones." 

To all outward appearances the Turkish husband 
was pleasant and agreeable to all his wives alike ; they 
had a table to themselves and chatted together and 
appeared to be having a pleasant time. The intended 
bride was dressed in richest silks and her large, dreamy 
eyes and beautiful face attracted the notice of many 
of the passengers. Arriving at Beirut we found the 
wharves decorated for the reception of the distin- 
guished party. A number of small boats, decorated 
with star and crescent, filled with officials and friends, 
many of them carrying beautiful bouquets of flowers, 
came alongside the ship, and aboard to welcome the 
expectant bride and her company. Among the num- 
ber was the groom. Before meeting him she followed 
the ancient custom so far as to veil her face. I was 
told that the wedding would take place in the even- 
ing, that there would be a great marriage feast, and 
that the rejoicing and feasting would continue several 
days as became the social position of the high con- 
tracting parties. 

We had several commercial travelers with us in- 
troducing English and German goods in the East. I 
was wishing I might meet an American engaged in 
the same business. I am sure our cotton goods, boots, 
shoes, etc., would find a ready sale in the Levant. A 
Greek gentlemen said ; " Why don't you bring Ameri- 
can shoes here? I am sure they are much better than 
those the natives make ; bring them ! bring them ! !" 
One of our table companions, an Englishman, repre- 
senting Stevens Ink Company, had been everywhere, 
knew all the steamers, the best and the poorest, and 
had a most entertaining way of telling all sorts of odd 
experiences which had befallen him in his travels. He 
was the first Englishman I ever met who could out- 
talk a genuine New England Yankee, and I am sure he 
could do this and give the Yankee a good fair start. 
He was most genial and companionable and helped to 
while away the long and otherwise tedious dinner 
hour on board the Orenoque. 

♦ * ♦ 
OUR NEGRO POPULATION. 



As a result of requests for information from all 
over the country, the Census Office has issued a bul- 
letin on " Negroes in the United States," containing 
statistics with regard to the extent, character and 
condition of the negro population in the several states 
of the Union. The summary of the results given in 
the bulletin is in part as follows : 



"The number of negroes in the United States (in- 
cluding Alaska, Hawaii and Porto Rico) is 9,200,000, 
perhaps a larger number than is found in any other 
country outside of Africa. Nearly nine-tenths of the 
negroes in continental United States are found in the 
Southern States. The largest number of negroes liv- 
ing in compact masses are found in certain urban 
counties, several of which lie outside of the great cot- 
ton-growing States. The four, each having over 75,- 
000, are . the District of Columbia, Shelby county, 
Tennessee, containing Memphis ; Baltimore City, Md., 
and Orleans parish. La., coextensive with New Or- 
leans. 

" The district in which the proportion of negroes 
is greatest Hes in the Mississippi alluvial region along 
both banks of the Lower Mississippi, where five- 
eighths of the population is negro, the maximum 
being in Issaquena County, Miss., with more than 
15 negroes to each white person. The center of the 
negro population is in DeKalb County, Alabama, about 
four miles from the western boundary of Georgia, 
and 33 miles south of the southern boundary of Tenn- 
essee. 

" In the country districts as a whole, the negro males 
outnumber the negro females slightly and in the cities 
the females outnumber the males decidedly. This dis- 
association of the sexes between city and country is 
far more marked among the negroes than among 
whites and has increased since 1890. 

" Among negroes 44.5 per cent are illiterate. The 
percentage of illiteracy has decreased rapidly since 
1890, when it was 57.1 per cent. Illiteracy among 
negroes is about, seven times as common as among 
whites, and this ratio between the races has not altered 
materially in the last ten years. Illiteracy among the 
Southern negroes is about four times that among 
Southern whites. If the per cent of illiterates should 
fall in each succeeding ten years by as great an amount 
as it did between 1890 and 1900, an improbable as- 
sumption, it would reach zero about 1940. 

" There was a decided increase between 1890 and 
1900 in the proportion of marriages among young 
negroes. This increase of early marriages was yet 
more marked among Southern whites of both sexes 
and was probably due to the great prosperity of the 
country just before 1900. 

" There are nearly 4,000,000 negroes in the United 
States engaged in gainful occupations. These persons, 
who may be called breadwinnners, constitute 45.2 per 
cent of the total negro population, while for the total 
white population the per cent is 37.3 and for the South- 
ern whites 34.2." 

<* 4" * 

Only what we have wrought into our character dur- 
ing life we can take with us. — Humboldt. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



STATE REFORMATORY SERVICES. 



CLASS AVES.— ORDER GALLATORES. 



BY S. W. CAREER. 

This institution is located at Pontiac, 111. It is an 
institution of considerable magni-feude, designed as a 
home and school for boys who have been convicted 
of crime, also many wayward and reckless, seeming to 
have no home or any one to care for them, find a home 
here. At the time of our visit there were about thir- 
teen hundred inmates. 

Upon our arrival we were conducted to the recep- 
tion office, in which were many specimens of work 
done by the boys — pen and pencil work, literary work 
and from the Industrial Department tools showing 
the highest art in workmanship and finish. Hav- 
ing read the rules governing visitors, about two doz- 
en having assembled, we were conducted by guards to 
the vast auditorium, being seated upon an elevation 
we could look out upon the empty chairs below. Up- 
on signal the doors on each side opened, and to a strain 
of music the inmates came marching in. The manner 
in which they entered, were seated, and dismissed 
proves that system is order, though compulsory and 
under attending guards it is economy of time. Each 
one as well as the visitors were supplied with a copy 
of the Sunday Messenger, which contained the les- 
son and hymns for Sunday, Jan. 25, 1905. This is a 
weekly paper devoted to the interests of the inmates of 
the institution, we supposed published and printed 
there. The inmates were dressed in dark gray, having 
a neat and clean appearance, walked erect and looked 
up. Their countenances, instead of gloomy and sullen 
as we expected, were bright and looked as if ready to 
give vent to cheerfulness. They seemed to have one 
privilege: that was to give applause to the music and 
witty remarks of the speaker. Many of the boys rang- 
ing in ages from five years to twenty-one years showed 
indications of marked intelligence, but Oh ! the sources 
of evil influences that captivate the youth. 

The Program of Services. 

1. All Stand and Sing Song, " Come to the Savior, Make 
no Delay." 

2. Lord's Prayer, By Chaplain 

3. Music, By Orchestra 

4. Responsive Reading of Lesson. Matt. 5: 1-16. 

5. Solo, By young lady 

6. Bowed heads in Prayer. 

7. Music. 

8. Address by Chaplain, "Wait on the Lord." Psa. 27: 
14. 

9. Instrumental Music. 
10. Benediction. 

As we tried to make a sketch of the address we gath- 
ered the leading, thought which was given only in an 
indirect way, which was this : " Boys, wait for your 
time of release." 

Decatur, III. 



Individual — Cranes. 



Late in the Autumn when the chilling blasts from 
the regions of eternal snow are beginning to be felt 
in more southern latitudes, bringing with them 
myriads of the summer visitors to an Arctic climate — 
vast trains of ducks, geese, etc., to seek again their 
winter resorts beneath a milder sky, — then may be 
heard in the vicinity of our inland lakes and streams 
the harsh voice of the Whooping Cranes, as they pass 
swiftly overhead, in companies of 'from ten to fifty. 
While migrating they fly high into the air, but when 
near the spot where they purpose to search for food, 
they gradually descend, wheeling around in circles 
over the place until they reach the ground. Here they 
present a graceful and elegant appearance, the old 
birds in particular being stately and beautiful objects, 
the plumage is mostly of a snowy whiteness, except 
the primaries and the primary coverts, which are nearly 
black. This bird is quite unknown as a resident or 
even a transient visitor in the Eastern and Middle 
States, its haunts being confined to the South and West. 
It winters as far south as Mexico, and breeds from 
Oregon northward to the Artie regions. 

Their food consists of the roots of plants, which 
they dig up with great labor from the mud of shallow 
ponds which have dried up during the Summer; they 
also resort to the plantations of sweet potatoes, and 
dig among the hills for a few roots which may have 
been left in the ground by the farmer. They will also 
feed on small reptiles, such as frogs, toads, lizards, 
small snakes, snails and grain. 

They are said to be extremely wary birds, and very 
difficult to approach, the least rustling of leaves or 
the cracking of a stick under foot being sufficient to 
alarm them, although they may be at a considerable 
distance. Their sense of sight and hearing is so keen, 
that they will hear the approach of a hunter at a great 
distance, and will discover him long before he can see 
them. When once aware of his advances, no matter 
how cautious he may be, they will generally prove too 
much for him, eluding all his attempts to gain access 
to them. 

The Whooping Crane stands in height about four 
feet, and is principally confined to the Mississippi 
Valley. It seeks its food in the wild uplands, feeding 
upon insects and plants. About thirteen inches of 
the windpipe are twisted up in a hollow of the breast- 
bone, thus giving to the voice a sonorous, trumpet- 
like tone. 

Another of the Crane family inhabits the Northern 
part of the Mississippi Valley and is rather blue in 
color and is often called the Blue Sand Hill Crane. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, liHl;,. 



HIS CONSCIENCE. 



BY J. GRANT FIGLEY. 



A Twentieth Century Allegory. 

The days came and went and were swallowed up 
in years, yet they brought not happiness or peace to 
Gardener Tracy. By day he sought to fight off the 
madness of despair that seemed to be clutching and 
binding his brain with white-hot bands. By night he 
wandered forth and sought by the gaming table, the 
saloon, and other places of questionable character to 
drown the cries of outraged innocence, and betrayed 
confidence and love. In sleep, dark, formless shapes 
haunted him. He dreamed that he was young again 
and free, that all was good to him, that all the future 
was before him, and that naught but happiness was 
his. 

His lost wife (lost because she had fallen dead at 
his feet, killed by his heartless, cruel words of sep- 
aration) then floated before him in fleecy, angelic robes, 
in a shining cloud of light, and sorrowfully looked 
upon the wretched something that he saw was him- 
self and yet zvas not. He sought to go to her and she 
beckoned him on, and on he followed, yet wondering 
all the while thereat that he could so easily speed 
through space among the clouds and strange shapes 
that were on every hand. Dark clouds enveloped him 
and seemed to have hands that clutched his throat and 
hair, and sought to stay him on his course. But he 
willed to be free and the clouds sped away, and afar 
in the distance he could see his wife beckoning him. 
And on he went until it seemed to him that he had 
sped to the uttermost parts 'of space. He seemed to 
see the earth a mere speck in the distance, and then as 
on he rushed past stars and suns and legions of 
worlds, all was lost in the distance, and still onward 
he sped, into the blackness of darkness of space and 
infinitude. But where was his wife who had been 
beckoning him? The shining light by which he knew 
her was nowhere to be seen. He had lost her! 
Around and about him was thick darkness, and he 
groaned in the anguish of his heart. And his groans 
were echoed and re-echoed through all the silent re- 
gions of darlgiess. He prayed and moaned and 
cursed, and raved, as a madman, and the silent depths 
sent him back onjy the wailing echoes of his own 
words. Still on and on he drifted alone ! alone ! And 
he reviewed as in a mirror the events of his life, and 
he saw wherein he had done good and felt wherein 
he had done wrong. The past rose before him as a 
picture and showed him to be what he was, and what 
he should have been. And he thought to himself as 
he thus drifted a wreck on the seas of his ozvn soul, 
that there yet may be hope for -him. He was young 
yet and all the world was before him. And then the 



thought came to him that he was dead, anil yet was 
alive. In vain he tried to solve the question. He had 
argued himself into the theory that death ended all, 
and here he was more alive than ever, it seemed to 
him, but O the horror of it, the horror of it ! Was he 
thus to be tormented by his thoughts alone, forever? 
And there he drifted, it seemed to him for ages, and 
his only answer to his shouts and entreaties were their 
wailing echoes. And shudderingly he would awake 
and find it all a dream, yet the dream itself was but 
a shadoiv. 

Again he slept and again he dreamed. He was 
with Cora, the loved and forsaken one, for whom he 
had broken his young wife's heart. Then the awful 
scene of the. burning theater wherein she had lost her 
beauty and was made a hopeless cripple, flitted before 
him, and he saw himself carrying the suffering Cora 
from the building. And he saw her lying almost life- 
less, disfigured and agonized, in her little cot in the 
hospital, and he saw himself tearing away from her 
poor burned arms and leaving the building. And he 
saw a trail of greenish^ fire that followed him and 
licked up hungrily the imprints of his footsteps, and 
seared and scorched whatever it touched, till he had 
reached his home. And as he slept this terrible flame 
enveloped him in its many arms, and breathed its 
scorching breath upon his face, and it seemed that he 
awoke to fight away the monster that was roasting 
his brain. And it laughed at him, did this Flame 
borne of himself, and more tightly wrapped him in its 
fiery folds. He cried and moaned and cursed that it 
might leave him, for his pain was greater than he could 
bear. His flesh was burning and its fetid odors made 
his soul sick, and his bones felt, as rods of white-hot 
iron, and his every breath was smoke and flame. He 
was racked with the most exquisite pains, burning yet 
unconsumed. And his Fire-Demon mocked him, and 
hugged him the closer. And in his shrieks for mercy 
he awoke and found it a dream that was not all a. 
dream. 

And again this wretched man, m'ade wretched by 
his own hand, fell asleep and saw himself on board a 
ship sailing grandly across the ocean blue, and the 
sun was shining brightly through heaven's ethereal 
blue, and the air was balmy as the most beautiful 
spring morning. As he leaned over the rail contem- 
plating these things, a sudden chilly wind swept over 
the vessel, and looking up he saw a small gray cloud 
coming down from the sky, toward the vessel, and it 
grew in size and came nearer and nearer. And the 
air was filled with its moaning sounds, and then as 
its icy breath struck deeper and deeper through him, 
it turned away and plunged into the 'green blue waves 
of the ocean, and eagerly, hungrily drank up the water, 
and higher and higher rose this horrid typhoon, child 



THE INGLENOOK.— January ;i, 1905. 



of Futen, the Wind God, and it churned the ocean 
into foam, defying Indra, the God of the Atmosphere. 
And the ship staggered on, while around and about 
and upon it the Storm King breathed his icy breath ; 
and deeper sank the typhoon into ' the ocean's vitals, 
and then angrily shot aloft and filled the air with its 
horrid shape. And it shook its hoary locks angrily 
and filled the ship with the flakes. And then it burst 
and the ocean sank back again, and the ship staggered 
on, creaking and groaning in every joint. For she was 
dashing through an icy spray that fastened upon her, 
and the Wind God laughed in glee as he rushed 
through her rigging, and danced along her decks, and 
entered her cabins. And Gardner Tracy could not 
hide from him, for he singled him out and smote him 
to the bone and marrow with his icy breath, and he 
dashed the salty spray upon him, and blew clouds of 
snow — great clouds of snow- — into his eyes, and froze 
the tears that tried to well up, as he struggled to pray 
for God to let him die, or take away this plague. And 
the Wind-God smote him sorely with the great hail 
that fell in clouds, and he longed for Oblivion to come 
to his relief, but the Ice-King froze the words upon 
his tongue, and on and on he drifted in the frozen ship 
upon the freezing sea. And he awoke and was glad 
it was only a dream. 

And again he slept and again he dreamed. He 
thought he was in a foreign land, traveling, and was 
intoxicated with the beauty of the scenery and the 
grandeur of the whole country. He passed through 
Hiero-Salem, that wondrous city of old, and saw 
where the Man of Sorrows had expiated the sins of 
men upon the cross, and onward he pressed towards 
his somehow unknown destination. But Tasko, the 
bandit, is upon his track, and he is taken captive and 
tied to a horse and for many days he is a prisoner. 
Then Tasko loosens him from the horse, and beats 
him with stripes until he falls fainting. Then Tasko 
orders water to be thrown upon him to revive him, 
and that salt be rubbed into his wounds. And he 
moans with anguish and begs Tasko to let him go, or 
kill him for pity. But Tasko only laughs and with his 
knife cuts out his tongue and strikes out his eyes. Then 
with another horrid, ghoulish laugh, Tasko and his 
men leave him to his fate. And as he wanders many 
days over burning sands, blind, speechless, ready to die, 
dying a thousand deaths, yet still living. And the 
sun beats down fiercely upon his uncovered head un- 
til his brain seems on fire, and he begs in his soul for 
water to' quench his awful thirst, but none is found. 
And in his delirium he fancies he is Isaac Ahasuerus, 
the Jew, and that he is suffering forever for his wicked 
act one day in Hiero-Salem, when the Man of Nazareth 
was going up to his crucifixion, and he mocked him and 
struck him. Was he not tarrying till Jeshu came 



again ? He would soon conic and take away the aw- 
ful curse ! And still he wandered on and reached an 
oasis where he lay down to rest and there he found 
a pool of cool, fresh water. And when he stooped to 
drink, it sank away when his parched and bleeding 
lips touched it, and naught was there but hot and 
scorching sand! And in his agony he wept tears of 
blood, and smote his breast, and cursed himself and 
his God, and in this awful anguish he awoke and found 
it was all a dream. 

And the days came and went, and Gardner Tracy 
dreamed other dreams, and knew not that he was but 
exploring the recesses of his own soul ; knew not that 
his dreams were not dreams, but the promptings of 
an inner and hidden self, striving to bring him to a 
realization of his lost condition and. to prepare him- 
self for that which otherwise must surely come to him 
if he truly did not repent, but in vain. And in the 
depths of his misery he groaned aloud as did one of 
old. 

" Let the day perish wherein I was born. Let that 
day be darkness; let not God regard it from above, 
neither let the light shine upon it. Let darkness and 
the shadow of death stain it; let a cloud dwell upon it 
let the blackness of the day terrify it. As for that 
night, let darkness seize upon it; let it not be joined 
unto the days of the year ; let it not come into the num- 
ber of the months. Lo, let that night be solitary ; let 
no joyful voice come therein. Let them curse it that 
curse the daj', who are ready to raise up their mourn- 
ing. Let the stars of the twilight thereof be dark; 
let it look for light, but have none ; neither let it see the 
dawning of the day. Wherefore is light given to him 
that is in misery, and life unto the bitter in soul, which 
long for death, but it cometh not; and dig for it more 
than for hidden treasures; which rejoice exceedingly, 
and are glad when they can find the grave? Why is 
light given to a man whose way is hidden, and whom 
God hath hedged in ? For my sighing cometh before I 
eat, and my roarings are poured out like the waters. 
For the thing which I greatly feared is come upon me, 
and that which I was afraid of is come unto me. I was 
not in safety, neither had I rest, neither was I quiet; 
yet trouble came. When I lie down, I say. When shall 
I arise, and the night begone ? and I am full of tossings 
to and fro until the dawning of the day. When I say. 
My bed shall comfort me, my couch shall ease my com- 
plaint ; then thou scarest me with dreams, and terriHeth 
me ivith visions; so that my soul chooseth strangling, 
and death rather than my life. I have sinned; what 
shall I do unto thee, O thou preserver of men? why 
hast thou set me as a mark against thee, so that I am 
a burden to myself ? " 

And so we leave him alone with his conscience. 
Bryan, Ohio. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



OUR ALPHABET OF GREAT MEN. 



SY OLIVE MILLER. 



B. — Bacon, Lord Francis. 

I ONCE heard read in one of the dehghtful Pansy 
books an amusing incident about the subject of our 
sketch. 

In a certain school the teacher was accustomed to 
give out subjects for essays once a month. One even- 
ing she gave to Fanny Rhodes the topic, " Bacon." 
Poor Fanny hated essays worse than any of the 
others, and on hearing the subject she fairly groaned. 
But she did the best she could, and at the close of the 
month brought her essay to class to read. She was 
among the first to be called upon and thus she began : 

Bacon. 

" The subject assigned to me this month is bacon. I 
do not know that much can be said on this subject. Ev- 
erybody knows all there is to say about it. It is simply 
the flesh of hogs, salted or pickled or dried." 

At the close of the sentence the pupils were in such 
roars of laughter that Fanny's voice was completely 
drowned. " Oh, Fanny," said the teacher, " did you 
really think I meant pork?" 

" Why, what else did you mean ? " exclaimed Fanny. 

" I thought of course you would understand that 
I meant Lord Bacon." 

" Lord Bacon," said poor Fanny, " why, I never 
heard of him." 

And so I suppose the next month found Fanny 
studying the life of this great man who possessed 
one of the greatest minds of any person in the world's 
history. 

He was born in London during the reign of Queen 
Elizabeth. That was nearly three hundred and fifty 
years ago. Isn't that a long time to be remembered? 
His father was keeper of the seals for the Queen and 
his mother was a noble and learned woman who was 
very strict with her boy. 

During his childhood he often met the great lords 
and ladies who lived at the queen's court. History 
says he was somewhat of a pet and the. queen de- 
lighted to call him her Little Lord Keeper. No doubt 
his association with learned people caused him while 
yet a child to show wisdom far beyond his years. 

When he was only twelve years old he was sent to 
Trinity College at Cambridge. Here he studied phi- 
losophy and when he was only fifteen years old he 
wrote a paper against the philosophy of Aristotle, — 
rather a difficult subject for a boy of his age, was it 
not? But it was so in all his studies. At an age 
when most boys are just entering upon serious study 
he had already been over the ground : his mind was 
fixed and his opinions were formed. The field of his 
future already lay open before him. 



One of the rules of Trinity College was, that the 
students dared not speak to each other during school 
hours except in the Latin, Greek, or Hebrew language. 
All students who disobeyed the rules of the college 
in any way were brought together on Thursday even- 
ings at seven o'clock and flogged for their offenses, 
in the presence of the undergraduates. It would be 
interesting to know in what language Bacon con- 
versed with his fellow-students and whether he was 
ever punished by his teachers. 

After he left Cambridge he was appointed to go to- 
France with the English minister, and for three years 
he went from city to city of that kingdom in the 
train of the English ambassador. 

But after while his father died and he returned to 
England. He began the study of law at Gray's Inn. 
He became one of the greatest lawyers England ever 
had, and wrote books which the lawyers of to-day 
study carefully. But it took him twenty-five long 
years before he succeeded in convincing the people 
how great he was. His uncle. Lord Burghley, was 
very jealous of him, and by working against him 
continually, made it very hard for him to gain the 
queen's favor and the high opinion of the people. 

But after the queen died, King James came to the 
throne of England. He was very kind to Bacon 
until Bacon made some bad mistakes, and then the 
king imprisoned him in the Tower. It was only for 
two days, but he came forth in ruin and disgrace and 
never afterward returned to court. Five years after- 
ward he died. 

He was a man who depended all his life upon the fa- 
vors of the king or queen. ■ When they looked kindly 
upon him he was happy and prosperous, but when they 
turned their backs upon him, his outlook was gloomy 
indeed. We cannot help thinking how much better 
is the character of a man who carves his way alone, 
independent of princely favors. Then, too, he lived in 
a princely style that was far above what he could af- 
ford and this kept him always in debt. So we see- 
that with all his greatness and wisdom he made some 
mistakes that it would be well for us to avoid. 

Besides his books on law and philosophy he wrote a 
large number of essays, and as I read some of these, 
I see thoughts which are quite easy enough for boys 
and girls to understand. I will give some of these 
thoughts and perhaps some of you will choose them' 
for memory-gems at school. 

" Good thoughts, though God accepts them, yet 
towards men are little better than good dreams, ex- 
cept they be put in act." 

" A man that is }'oung in years may be old in hours, 
if he have lost no time ; but that happeneth rarely." 

" Young men, in the conduct and manage of actions, 
embrace more than they can hold, stir more than they 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



can quiet; fly to the end, without consideration of the 
means and degrees ; pursue some few principles which 
they have chanced upon absurdly. Men of age ob- 
ject too much, consult too long, adventure too little, 
repent too soon, and seldom drive business home to 
the full period, but content themselves with a medioc- 
rity of success. Certainly it is good to compound em- 
ployments of both." 

" Virtue is like a rich stone, best plain set." 

Bacon was a lover of the beautiful, as we see from 
the following extract from " Gardens " : 

" God Almighty first planted a garden ; and indeed 
it is the purest of human pleasures ; it is the greatest re- 
freshment to the spirits of man ; without which build- 
ings and palaces are but gross handiworks ; and a man 
shall ever see, that, when age grows to civility and 
elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to 
garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater per- 
fection. I do hold it in the royal order of gardens, 
there ought to be gardens for all the months in the 
year, in which severally, things of beauty may be then 
in season." And he then goes on to name and describe 
the hundred diiiferent plants which he would select, 
all in their season. Surely there was no limit to the 
different subjects that this great man had met and 
mastered. 

North Manchester, Ind. 

* * * 

LOCUST EATING. 



superior to quails and pigeons. The Hottentots make 
from the eggs a delicious soup; they also roast the 
locusts over a slow fire, and eat them as we do caramels 
or bonbons. Dr. Livingstone says he used them at 
first from necessity, when deprived of all other food ; 
" but, strange to say, grew daily more fond of them, 
and at last preferred them to shrimps or oysters." — St. 
Nicholas. 

♦ ♦ 4" 

A FOSSIL EGG. 



We read in the Bible that the food of John the 
Baptist was " locusts and wild honey." A great deal 
of pains has been taken by commentators to prove that 
it was not what we call locust, but the fruit of the wild 
carob tree, that John ate with the honey that he found 
in the wilderness where he lived. 

But I do not think that anyone who has traveled 
in Arabia, found rest and shelter in an Arab's tent, 
and been a guest at his hospitable board, would thus 
judge of what the Bible means by " locusts." In Tur- 
key, Persia, Arabia, and all that region of country, 
locusts — genuine, bona fide locusts — have been eaten 
from remote antiquity; and to this day they form an 
important item of food used by the common people. 
The Bedouins collect them in immense quantities, 
and after a partial drying, pack them in sacks. Then 
at their convenience, when the season for collecting 
is over, they steam the insects in close vessels over a 
hot fire, winnow them in broad baskets to remove the 
legs and wings, and then pulverize between flat stones. 
When wanted for food, they are only moistened with 
a little water, just as the Arabs do in preparing their 
date-flour, and then the repast is all ready. 

The Moors boil or fry them, seasoning with salt, 
pepper and vinegar; and they pronounce them even 



Very few eggs in the fossil state have ever been 
found. Several unearthed in New Zealand are only 
shells preserved by reason of their thickness and 
strength. Eggs found in tertiary rocks of Auvergne, 
France, many thousands of years old, are shells filled 
with hardened mud. Another fossil egg, thought to be 
that of duck, has been discovered in South Dakota. 

A while ago a prospector' hunting for placer gold 
in the gravels of the Gila River broke a piece out of 
one side of a small stone which he had struck with 
pick. He was surprised to see within a smooth in- 
ner core which looked like an egg. 

He carefully removed the mass of hard calcareous 

rock in which it was imbedded, and exposed a perfect 

typical egg. In size it is 2.44 by 1.57 inches, and its 

- shape indicates clearly that it belongs to the class of 

water birds. 

Comparing it with the egg of birds of the present 
time it is found to correspond closely with the type of 
egg laid by the cormorant. In physical structure the 
shell is practically indistinguishable from the shell of 
birds' eggs of the present time. As the minute tracings 
of the shell are reproduced on the inner surface of the 
rock which enclosed it, it is assumed that the egg was 
completely incased in the limestone very soon after 
it had been deposited in the nest. 

The limestone matrix has kept the specimen in a 
very fine state of preservation for untold centuries. 
The egg has been opened and found to contain a tarry 
material resembling natural asphalt. All the evidence 
collected indicates that this asphalt-like substance is sl 
part of the original contents of the egg, which has be- 
come bitumenized. 

♦ * * 

DANGEROUS CATERPILLARS. 



The hairs of the brown caterpillar, which is the 
caterpillar of che brown-tail moth, are full of tiny 
barbs so extremely small that they are quite invisible. 
The barbs catch in the human skin and break off. 
This causes the skin to itch enough to lead the person- 
to scratch. Inflammation follows, and sometimes this 
produces an eruption that is even worse than the 
blistering caused by poison ivy. 



10 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



SAVING VOLTAGE. 



BY HENRY B. BIXLER. 



To any one interested in electrical engineering and 
in the proper application and use of the terms used 
to explain the practical operation of electrical ma- 
chinery, the errors however slight, are quickly noticed. 

It is of one of these errors, contained in the Oct. 4, 
number of the Nook, that I have special reference to 
and which I intend to correct. 

To begin with, let us have an explanation of some 
of the terms used in this science, so we can better 
■understand what is to follow in this correction. Vol- 
tage is the unit of electrical pressure and is measured 
in volts. It is sometimes expressed as Electro- 
Motive-Force, arid is abbreviated E. M. F. Voltage 
has nothing to do with the amount of electricity, simply 
the pressure. The unit of electrical quantity is the 
ampere, and is measured in amperes. This is the 
amount of current contained along a wire or produced 
by a generator. Resistance is always present in con- 
ductors of electrical current and is measured in ohms, 
as the ohm is the unit of resistance. 

Power is spoken of in watts, and is the product of 
the current and voltage. Thus, W equals C, mulit- 
plied by E. Again C equals E divided by R and E 
equals C multiplied by R, and R equals E divided by 
C when E, is current, E, is E. M. F., R, is resistance, 
and W, is watts. A kilowatt is one thousand watts 
and is written K. W. There are 746 watts in one 
horse power. Now we have some of the principal 
terms that are used, and will now apply some of them 
to the correction of the article in question. 

On all electric railway lines, the voltage on the line 
is kept as nearly a constant pressure as possible, 
usually at 550 volts. 

The average city street car, requires between 50 
and 100 amperes to start the car motors and this cur- 
rent is delivered to them at a pressure of 550 volts at 
the moment the current is turned on. The voltage will 
remain at this pressure, provided the generators at 
the power house are of sufficient capacity to supply 
the full amount of current required, which if they are 
not will cause the voltage to drop and the amperage 
to rise. This lowering of voltage, can be plainly no- 
ticed by the dimness of the lights in the car, which 
will again be bright as the car is "under way." 
While the voltage cannot be saved, the current can, 
and the application of the current at the proper time, 
and a careful regulation of the amount turned on, is 
what makes the smoothtjess of the running of the car. 
A car requires a great deal more current to start it, 
than it uses to keep up the speed when it is once in 
motion. There can also be more current wasted, in 



running down hills with the power on, than is required 
to take the car up the next grade. 

A careful motorman is never seen running his car 
down hill with the power on, as he knows he is not 
only wasting expensive power, but is not getting any 
more speed on the car. 

So after all, it is not the voltage that is saved, but 
the saving of current, that is the great question which 
concerns owners and managers of power lines. 

One more correction is necessary, to an error in the 
answer to the question " What makes the wheels of 
a street car go around," in the same number of the 
Nook. The answer states, " The rails are charged 
and the current after passing through the motors, is 
carried back to the generators through the trolly wire 
over head or by the third rail." Now the rails are not 
charged, and the current is carried out along the 
trolly wire and after passing through the motors is 
returned to the generators along the rails which form 
the return current. Neither is the trolly wire charged, 
beyond the point where current is required. For 
. instance, take a railway, one mile long, and using a 
single car. Suppose this car to be starting on the 
track, just 100 ft. from the generator. The wire is 
only carrying current as far as the car and the rails 
are bringing it back, while beyond the car the line is 
" dead " so long as there is no connection between 
the trolly wire and the rails or earth. But when the 
car is at the extreme end of the track and power is 
turned on, the entire line is charged, as the current 
must flow to the motors, along the conductor for that 
purpose, the trolly wire, never the service rails. 

E. Akron, Ohio. 

* * * 

CHARITY. 



BY LAVINA KALEY. 



In a town near Springfield, Ohio, there lived a 
large family of nine in a little cottage, near an open 
place in the forest, which had been cleared away for 
plantation the spring before. 

The family was poor and had no means of support 
except for the mother to seek employment in the busy 
city of Springfield. 

The father had died just after the field was cleared, 
and had left them just enough for the funeral ex- 
penses. 

Harry the oldest child was a boy of fourteen, who 
went about the farm work as happy as one who did it 
only as a pleasure. 

His sister Anna, who was thirteen years old, 
helped him about the farm, and was also, bright, happy 
and industrious. 

Emma, the next younger child of. eleven, was house- 
keeper while the mother was away. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



11 



Tillie was ten years old and would help her older 
sister very much by taking her younger sisters and 
brothers out for a walk after school hours and telling 
them about the wonderful fairies in their dreams. 

One day while the younger children were at school 
Emma was in the house doing tlie week's wash- 
ing. It was Monday, and Tillie did not have any 
school on account of the teacher's illness. Tillie 
v/as out under the shade trees thinking how poor they 
were when she saw a little girl of her own age, whom 
she at once recognized to be an old friend of hers, 
whom she had not seen for five years. 

This girl's mother was rich and had always helped 
them in every way. 

When she found their condition she gave them 
money arid everything they were in need of, and they 
lived happily for many years. 

i§i^ Chicago Ave., Evanston, III. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
TARDINESS. 



BY ANNA G. OBRECHT. 



The effects of tardiness are numerous ; perhaps 
more so than we can at first comprehend. 

" So often it is looked upon as a small matter and we do 
not look at its effects and influence as seriously as we 
ought. 

Let us consider for a moment the reflection we are 
throwing upon the world. The superintendent an- 
nounces Sunday school to begin at ten o'clock. Next 
Sunday it is half past ten before Sunday school com- 
mences and some of the young people, or rather some 
of the boys, that should have been in the Sunday school 
have been there and gone. For this to continue from 
tiirie to time causes lack of interest in the work. It 
robs the Sunday school of its time. It only has one 
hour each week ; no time to spare. The teacher hurries 
to do an hour's work in half an hour's time. 

To have pupils come in late affects the school by stop- 
ping the interest. The teacher has to go over and ex- 
plain what has been said and done. Then too, the 
pupils are not all so interested but what some will stop 
to see who is coming in. 

The superintendent is not always to blame for the 
tardiness. Of course there are some who ought to be 
prompted a little, but if the pupils are not there how can 
the superintendent commence when he hasn't any one 
with whom to commence. 

1 hose who have reached the years of accountability, 
who know right from wrong and who are always tardy 
have themselves to blame more than anybody else. 

In our homes if we expect company at a certain hour 
we prepare ourselves and are ready for them. Now 
why can't we, as a Christian people, respect the God 



whom we are trying to serve by being at the house of 
worship ready for work at the hour appointed? Of 
course there are exceptions to all rules and at times it 
cannot be helped. 

We should be like the wise virgins who had oil in 
their lamps and were ready. 

Let us do our small part as well 'as we can and the re^ 
ward will certainly be great. Perhaps being on time 
at Sunday school and encouraging others is part of 
the work set for us to do. 

We all know that the mission of the Sunday school 
is to bring the young people, in particular, to the house 
of worship and to create in them enthusiasm for the 
work and love for God. 

Let us then make a greater effort to be on time at 
all services, realizing that we are working for God, and 
a nobler work we cannot find. 

Harlan, Iowa. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE FIELD MOUSE. 



" The mouse is not only one of the chief dreads of 
womankind, but it is an all-round nuisance in many 
instances," said the man, " and I was just thinking of 
a report made recently which gave international promi- 
nence to this wee pest of the home. The mouse is 
made the subject of a consular report from La Rochelle, 
France, and a good plan for getting rid of the member 
is suggested. Among other things the Consul says 
that to destroy these pests people formerly resorted 
to asphyxiation by filling the burrows with smoke, or to 
drowning by pouring water into them, or to sowing 
poison about the fields. The latter proved dangerous 
to domesticated animals. At the present day another 
method is used — infection by a microbe that is deadly 
to rats and mice only. In 1893 Dr. Danysz, while 
studying the habits of field mice, observed that large 
numbers of mice died from disease. He collected 
virus, made cultures, and assured himself that these 
cultures produced the disease in healthy rats and mice. 
These experiments were made on a large area, nearly 
200 acres, and seemed conclusive to the experts. This 
method of destruction has been recently commenced 
and carried out systematically on a surface of 2,800 
acres. The French Parliament appropriated 295,000 
francs ($56,935) to be used for the destruction of the 
mice by virus. Maybe the mouse will get into Ameri- 
can politics some day. The mouse might be made an 
issue, so we can get a Government appropriation to 
exterminate him. The women, no doubt, would 
favor the plan." 

♦ * * 

Exactness in little duties is a wonderful source of 
cheerfulness. 



12 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



IRRIGATION'S PART IN THE WORLD'S FAIR. 



BY GUY E. MITCHELL. 



Of the hundreds and thousands of people who have 
viewed with amazement the magnificent fruits and 
grains from the western States exhibited at the St. 
Louis Fair — far more notable in size, appearance and 
yield than anything they ever saw in the east — how 
many of them ever realized the cause of this effect? 
How many of them have thought out the wonderful 
fact that these products were born upon lands which a 
few years ago were useless deserts, but now made fer- 
tile by the art of irrigation? 

No " irrigation exhibits " of prominence were in ev- 
idence at the World's Fair, as such, yet in everything 
agricultural they formed a leading part and their with- 
drawal would have left huge gaps and have taken 
away the best. Had the products of the dam and the 
ditch all been labeled 

" Grown by Irrigation " 

the irrigation exhibit would have been a very big one. 
And it seems to me that this would have been a good 
thing. The west is proud of its irrigation ; why not 
thus call attention to its superiority of production ? 

Fabulous Grain Growths. 

In grains and grasses Colorado's exhibit led easily, 
though splendid showings were made by other arid 
states — Oregon, Washington, Montana, Utah, Califor- 
nia — but the Centennial State showed one hundred 
different kinds of grasses and one hundred and thir- 
ty varieties of grain. It had oats eight feet tall and 
timothy heads eight inches long. It took three hun- 
dren and forty prizes and eighty-nine gold medals. 
And its separate fruit exhibit included almost all the 
products of America except the truly tropical. 

Oregon had Mortgage Lifter Wheat, seven feet 
tall. Think of a wheat field in which an army of 
six foot men would stand concealed. And snow white 
onions six inches across. And Idaho and Utah and 
New Mexico, and all the west, set forth a dazzling dis- 
play of irrigated apples and plums, peaches and grapes 
of color, size and beauty which it would take a book 
to describe. 

But ahead of all the west in the extent and variety 
of her exhibit stood California — California, that vast 
strip of golden land reaching from Oregon to Mexico 
and including the vegetable wealth of the tropics. 

The Products of a Great Empire. 
Fruit is the main stay of the Golden State and two 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars is represented in 
her showings at St. Louis. The great Palace of 
Agriculture is the largest building of the Exposition, 
covering sixteen acres and it seemed as though I would 
never get outside of the domain of the California ex- 



hibit. Single counties made a showing creditable for 
a State. Such things caught the eye as a life-size ele- 
phant of English walnuts, the State Capitol building 
constructed of almonds, the famous Lick Observatory 
done in dried fruits and big enough to contain sev- 
eral families. The wine exhibit took the Grand Prize 
above all foreign competitors. The most luscious and 
enormous pears, peaches, oranges, lemons, grapefruit, 
plums, cherries and all kinds of huge vegetables were 
stacked in rich confusion, alongside of great branches 
and clusters of fruits of all kinds showing how things 
can grow under irrigation. The grape bunches of 
California are almost of the biblical kind requiring 
two men to carry a single bunch. No man can carry 
the product of a single vine. 

Government Irrigation Dam. 

Practical methods of irrigation were demonstrated 
at the Government building by a model of the Salt Riv- 
er Valley in Arizona, showing the great government 
dam now under construction in the mountains and the 
system of ditches and laterals by which the water is 
distributed onto the farms and orchards below. Real 
water was running through these ditches. This great 
work of Uncle Sam's in Arizona is progressing rap- 
idly, I was told by Engineer Savage whom I recently 
met in Montana. A cement mill, to make two hundred 
thousand barrels of cement needed in the masonry, is 
completed, a one hundred thousand dollar mountain 
road to convey the dam material from Phoenix is fin- 
ished and most remarkable, the river itself has been 
carried through tunnels around the dam site, and is 
furnishing some thousand electric horse power with 
which to build the dam. This is to be used to construct 
the giant works and thus the river will build its own 
dam and form a reservoir the greatest in the United 
States. 

Giant Pumping Machinery. 

Of all sizes and classes were the irrigation pumps 
exhibited in the farm implement department of the 
St. Louis Fair ; but more striking than these were 
the windmills. These busy machines, rearing their tall 
heads above the surrounding buildings and whirring 
gaily in the breeze formed a striking example of man's 
ingenuity in harnessing the elements. The highest of 
these, built by one of the largest windmill manufactur- 
ers, spread its galvanized steel wings one hundred 
and twenty feet in the air and with a moderate wind 
pumped forty thousand gallons an hour. The water 
gushed up like a fine artesian well and supplies a ditch 
to irrigate a good-sized farm. 

Irrigation's Future. 

What will be the next irrigation exhibit at a World's 
Fair? Some say that for many years to come, this is 
the last of the big international expositions. If this 
be so, and it should be fifteen or twenty years before 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



13 



another great Fair, when one does come, its irrigation 
exhibit is likely to overshadow everything else in agri- 
culture. The west is at the beginning of great things. 
The government has undertaken the work of national 
reclamation of the desert and is pushing the work 
rapidly. Vast engineering works — ^liilge dams and ca- 
nals are being constructed in the western states and 
territories and as the work proceeds the people will 
realize its wisdom and worth and it will be pushed 
forward still faster. As Engineer Savage remarked 
" It is an entrancing work, is it not ; this creating of 
homes for men out of desert waste? " 

And so twenty years from now, if the course of wis- 
dom is pursued and the government irrigation work 
continues along right lines and is kept pure of politics 
and of graft, we may see a west with nearly double its 
present population and the splendid products of Amer- 
ican irrigation reaching to every nook and corner of 

the world. 

*5* *J* ♦♦* 

ENJOYMENTS. 



BY GRACE LONGANECKER. 



Mankind in general enjoy a good meal, when 
hungry and blissful repose, when fatigued, but they do 
not all love to go a-fishing and a-hunting. 

Not long since, I had occasion to dwell near a lake, 
a locality in which fishing and hunting were exten- 
sively engaged in as a pastime. As it was so very un- 
interesting to me, the thought came to mind, " dif- 
ferent people have different enjoyments and how well 
we are known by our enjoyments." 

We sometimes think we are known by our employ- 
ments; of course we all know the saloon-keeper, 
but sometimes people engage in occupations not of 
their choice. 

Still, it remains to be proven, that we are not knpwn 
by our enjoj-ments. " For where your treasure is, 
there will your heart be also." A thing we enjoy, 
pleases us, cheers us and makes us happy. 

One loves to visit yonder battlefield where death 
reigns and human victims are trampled underfeet, to 
kill yet more and widen the curse ; while another dear 
soul loves to care for the wounded and lead them to 
him who said, " For all they that take the sword shall 
perish with the sword." 

One loves to visit the rich and enjoy their luxuries; 
while another seeks the poor and helpless and com- 
forts the fatherless. 

Jesus, in speaking of innocent children, rich or poor, 
said, " Whosoever receiveth one of such children in my 
name, receiveth me." 

One loves to go to places of merriment and pleasure, 
in the society of the vulgar, and laugh until they about 



" split their sides," (as they say) ; while another en- 
joys spending the same time in reading some good 
book or hearing some good concert or lecture. I've 
often heard people say they had no good time because, 
" there was no fun." Did Jesus ever laugh ? One 
loves to go to the lost, to save; while another en- 
joys injuring his brother, till he finally be lost. Lik- 
ing to perform missions of love is noble. 

Truly blessed are they who love to do kindly deeds, 
as Jesus, the Savior of mankind, filling all the air with 
their sweet influence. 

" How sweet 'twill be at evening 

If you and I can say, 
Good Shepherd we've been seeking 

The lambs that went astray; 
Heart-sore and faint with hunger, 

We heard them making moan; 
And lo! we come at nightfall 

Bearing them safely home! " 



Hartville, 0. 



♦ 4> * 
EGYPTIAN LOCUSTS. 



We may be thankful that we do not have the 
Egyrptian locust. One of the Department of Agri- 
culture explorers, who has been investigating the flow 
of the Nile and the great British government irrigation 
works, reports meeting with the African locust as 
follows : 

" The sheiks at each village came out gravely to 
salute us, except at one place where our arrival was 
simultaneous with that of a swarm of locusts. The 
insects were on the wing, not in a great cloud, not 
thick, but spread over a large area. When the ap- 
proach of the locusts was heralded by a watching 
'rowarra,' or gardener, the entire population, men, 
women and children, started out, armed with sticks 
and brush, to literally beat off the invaders. Smudges 
were built and lighted and every inducement was made 
to the' locusts to move on. Fortunately, for this 
particular village, at least, they did so. The locust of 
Africa, like all true locusts, is similar to the common 
grasshopper, but is about three inches long. 

It flies like a bird, keeping on the wing over great 
distances, and in such numbers that a swarm spreads 
devastation where it lights. It eats voraciously, de- 
vouring any green thing, and a swarm can absolutely 
strip an oasis in a short time. Hence their advent 
is regarded with consternation, as they can utterly 
destroy a date crop in a few hours, and this means 
famine, the dates being exchanged for all the neces- 
sities of life." 

The " locust " of the United States, known popularly 
as the seven-year, the fourteen-year locust, etc., is 
not a locust at all, but a cicada. It does little damage 
as compared with the true locust. 



14 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



THE INGLENOOK 

A Weekly Magazine 

PUBLISHED BY 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription price, $1.00 per Annum, in Advance. 

E. SI. Col)!), Editor. 

The Ingrlenook contains twenty-four pages weekly, devoted 
to the intellectual, moral and spiritual interests of the young. 
Each department is especially designed to fill its particular 
sphere in the home. 

Contributions are solicited. Articles submitted are adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine. A strong effort will 
be made to develop the latent talent of the constituency. 

Sample copies will be furnished upon application. Agents 
are wanted everywhere, and will be awarded a liberal com- 
mission. Change of address can only be made when the old 
address, as well as the new, is given. Club rates for Sunday 
schools and other religious organizations. Address as above. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



MARRIAGE LICENSE. 



Almost without exception all forms of licenses re- 
quire applicants to possess certain qualifications nec- 
essary to eligibility. The teacher's license cannot be 
had without an examination of the applicant, by the 
proper authorities for the purpose of gaining a knowl- 
edge of his ability. The license is granted, if granted 
at all, when the authorities are satisfied that the appli- 
cant is in possession of such knowledge as entitles him 
to the degree, or office, commanding such privileges 
as he desires. 

A certificate of proficiency, in the medical profession, 
is not obtained without years of study and actual prac- 
tice in human anatomy and materia medica. The ap- 
plicant must have knowledge of the mechanism of the 
body, the functions of all parts, their uses and abuses, 
remedies for diseases, and a lot of other things peculiar 
to their profession. Pharmacy has been reduced to 
a science which demands that her professors have suf- 
ficient knowledge to administer poisonous drugs with 
safety, and fill the M. D's. prescription with accuracy 
and reliability. 

An apprenticeship for several years must be faith- 
fully served before the applicant takes charge of his 
engine, shop, office or other places of equal responsi- 
bility. There are some licenses that may be bought 
and paid for with money, which, practically, is the only 
consideration. For instance, the saloon-keeper's li- 
cense; he pays the price which satisfies the law, opens 
his shop and begins business without any regard to 
his character or the character of his business or any- 
thing, further than that he pays the money. Almost 
the same thing is done in the case of the marriage li- 
cense. The only thing required is to pay the officials 
a few dimes and he issues the papers. As a matter, 
of course, the law fixes a certain age, but that can be 



adjusted with a little backsheesh. If the couple in 
question cannot obtain a license in one State, they may 
elope to another or be married on the Mississippi river, 
or retreat to the lakes. And many who fail to get 
licenses at all, even though there be no lines of eli- 
gibility to cross, succeed in living together a term of 
years without being married ; and those who are mar- 
ried a few months or years, and cannot or do not agree, 
may relieve themselves of the sore affliction by paying 
some magistrate a tip to " call it off." 

Now, the question is, why not reduce it to a system ? 
Why not have a real and literal examination to obtain 
license for marriage ? Why should not congress make, 
or cause to be made, a set of questions which shall be 
fully and completely answered by the bride and groom 
respectively, the answers to which should be examined 
and graded by a competent set of men and women 
who have made a success of married life, determining 
■ from the answers affixed thereto, by the contracting 
parties, their fitness for such obligation. 

Let them both be examined as to age, education, 
religion, occupation, etc. Let the husband, about-to- 
be, show himself able to support a wife and a willing- 
ness to do the same. Let the wife demonstrate to her 
superiors that she deserves the good home of a good 
husband and is able to reciprocate the demonstrations 
of his respect in all her domestic relations. Let no 
point be overlooked that might, in any way, be neglect- 
ed by either of the parties, and afterwards develop into 
unpleasantness, dissatisfaction and divorce. The world 
is becoming cognizant that the divorce question is 
one of the greatest evils of the day. It has been treated 
lightly and sneeringly, but its magnitude is arousing 
public suspicion, and well it may. If some precaution 
is not taken, eternity only will tell the result. If some 
one has a better remedy for the evil, let us hear what it 
is. 

* * * 

MONUMENTS. 



There is an inclination on the part of the people 
of different nations to want to remember great men 
with a block of cold marble, in some conspicuous place. 
France has sixteen hundred statues of Napoleon and 
three hundred of Joan of Arc. 

In this country nearly every great man that we have 
ever known must be remembered by a monument, rath- 
er than what he has written in the hearts of the people. 

We shall not attempt to censure the idea of remem- 
brances or a grave mark, but instead of putting thou- 
sands and hundreds of thousands of dollars of money 
into a piece of marble by which the people are to re- 
member the acts and words of a great man, how much 
better it would be to use that money for some chari- 
table purpose, as the Cooper Union, various libraries, 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



15 



colleges, universities, etc. Thousands of people have 
seen the Washington monument and yet who remem- 
bers George Washington on account of it? Practi- 
cally none. He is remembered because of the great 
life he lived. 

General Grant's services to the nation stand out 
much more prominently on the pages of history than 
upon the marble which bears his name. And now we 
are spending a half million dollars for our late mar- 
tyred President, whose name is revealed throughout 
the nation and whose face is familiar to every school- 
boy ; whose works and words are in the mouths of 
students, lawyers and statesmen ; whose character lies 
deeply entrenched in the hearts of his countrymen. 
Why rob the country of so much money to place 
in his honor a piece of lifeless stone, cut from 
the bowels of the earth, that means nothing but 
extravagance and injudicious expenditure of the 
peoples' money? It cannot magnify his name, 
office or life's work ; it cannot benefit him in any 
way; it does not even reflect respect upon his fam- 
ily. Rather than add, it detracts from the deference 
paid to the life of this great American. It lends its 
influence to encourage the yoftng man of to-day to 
some great act in life, in the hope that in the end he 
may have erected to his honor a similar obelisk, rather 
than live a life that will make his character ineffaceable 
in the hearts of his people. 

A real monument of life is built up, stone by stone ; 
each day a stone ! We are the artistic builders of our 
own monuments. What has been added to yours in 
1904? What plans have you made for next year to 
add to the beauty of the monument you are erecting? 
Don't tell me that you are erecting none. That man 
doesn't live who is not slowly but surely engraving 
his own photograph on the hearts and lives of those 
with whom he associates. And the broader his hori- 
zon and his circle of influence, the more photographs 
are being imprinted upon the souls of those who fol- 
low him, to a greater or less degree. 

If it is an epitaph you are working for, young man, 
don't worry about that. Very few men have died but 
what have had a grander epitaph than they deserve; 
a larger monument than they ever built. Let one thing 
be your aim — be sure you deserve the respect and 
honor which is already shown you ! 
4. 4. 4. 
INCONSISTENCY. 



Recently we have noticed in several exchanges 
that many of our smaller cities are having trouble 
with the various railroad companies about the location 
of livestock pens inside the corporation. The people 
become offended at the obnoxious odor arising from 
these pens and the sanitary commissioners declare them 



a nuisance. Strong efforts are being made to have 
them removed from the town because they are not 
only very disagreeable, but are considered to be ex- 
tremely dangerous from a health standpoint. No soon- 
er is a proposition like this set on foot than every busi- 
ness man and quite a majority of the residents rise up 
in arms and stand by in defense until they accomplish 
their purpose ; and in nine cases out of ten these pens 
are removed according to the wishes of the people. 
But now comes the inconsistency. 

These very same men will, year after year, permit a 
man or set of men to locate one or more saloons right 
in the business part of the city, and the closer and the 
more of them, the better, seemingly. No difference 
how many remonstrances are circulated for the expul- 
sion of these places. No difference how loudly these 
men profess Christianty or how high they stand so- 
cially, they are poor, wretched, miserable moral cow- 
ards. They don't dare to say a word against it ; they 
don't care to sign a remonstrance ; they don't dare to 
cast a vote against it; they even threaten the minister 
if he preaches against intemperance, and yet will cry 
until their throats are hoarse about the hogpen be- 
ing too near the center of the town. Now if they are 
really anxious to be consistent in the matter the 
thing would be for them to put the hogs in the sa- 
loons and then remove them outside of the city limits 
and open the doors so the poor hogs might have a 
chance to escape, because it is reasonable to suppose 
that hogs would be very glad to free themselves from 
such environments. The only kind of hogs that love 
such places as these are the hogs that have made them- 
selves such, and not the real hogs of nature. Instinct 
has taught all of God's creatures not to take things that 
are harmful to themselves, and man is the only one of 
his creatures who willingly and deliberately violates 
these laws and is perfectly willing to abide by the con- 
sequences. 

4t * 4t 

There is great variation in individuals of the same 
race, and the essential characteristics of any individual 
may be duplicated in an individual of wholly different 
race. If, however, the averages of the occurrence of 
certain features in a considerable number of indi- 
viduals of a race are taken, these features are found 
to be constant. The interesting fact is brought out 
that the more mixed the race the greater the variation. 
Thus the variations in the white race of the United 
States are the greatest, whereas those in the Mayas 
are the least, which corresponds with the fact that 
the whites are a complex racial mixture and the Mayas 
nearly pure. There is a suggestion that all the indi- 
viduals of an absolutely unmixed race would have the 
same general characteristics in the lines on the hands 
and feet. 



16 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



C-o-rreriLt IE3:a.pp)eri.in.g^3 



Measured in dollars the 12,000,000 bales of the 
1904 cotton crop are worth less than the 10,000,000 
bales of the 1903 crop. The difference in the total 
value is enormous. A pound of raw cotton which 
last February sold for seventeen cents is worth only 
eight cents now. Cotton is selling at forty dollars a 
bale now, as compared with seventy to seventy-five 
dollars a year ago. At that rate the total value of 
the 1904 crop will be less than $500,000,000, while the 
1903 crop sold for over $700,000,000. It is paradox- 
ical that as one result of the increased industry of the 
Southern planters they receive $200,000,000 less. If 
they had planted less, cultivated less and allowed the 
boll weevil to flourish they would have been better 
ofif. The immediate efifect will be to discourage South- 
ern enterprise and to diminish the value of internation- 
al exchange of the United States' principal article of 
export. The consumers of the world will be the bene- 
ficiaries. 

•4» i{i '(]» 

A SHIP owner. Sir Donald Curie, has extended 
the usefulness of the university of Edinburg, Scotland, 
by a donation of $125,000. 

* 4» * 

It has been reported that long distance telephones, 
in and out of Chicago, will be operated through the 
Illinois Company's wires and tunnels. This system of 
telephones is supposed to be owned and operated by 
a company that will compete with the Bell Telephone 
Company. 

* ♦ * 

While experimenting on new inventions Henry 
Mitchell, at Hammond, Ind., lost his entire eyesight 
and had his body somewhat mangled. The accident 
was caused by an unintentional ignition of smokeless 
powder. Mr. Mitchell is an inventor of some note. 

* * * 

A TREATY of peace between the Government of 
Paraguay and the Revolutionists has at last been 
signed. President Ezcurra and General Ferreira came 
on board the Argentine warship La Plata and drew up 
the papers. Some of the terms of the treaty are, 
first, concessions to the Revolutionists, second, resig- 
nation of President Ezcurra, and, third, election of 
Senator Guana to the presidency. 

♦ * ♦ 
The Newport Iron Foundry and Machine Company, 
at Newport, Ky., has been dynamited five times in 
the last two months. The nuisance is supposed to 
have been committed by strikers. 



Western cattle ranch men are losing a great quan- 
tity of stock by a new and very strange disease. The 
animals ' affected act very much like they have been 
poisoned; but the strange feature of the case is, the 
disease seems to be contagious. So far no help has 
been found. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

A GENERAL Uprising in St. Petersburg occurred a 
couple of weeks ago, caused by the great desire, on 
the part of the common people, to have the war ended. 
Peace was restored by the very brave action of the 
policemen, who, it is said, acted very humanely and 
avoided brutality as much as possible. 

♦ ♦ 4" 

An exciting scene was witnessed in one of the 
churches in Grand Rapids, Mich., when an Italian, by 
the name of James Delatto, who was suffering from 
dementia, brought on by typhoid fever, entered the 
crowded house and terrorized the worshipers by 
wielding an ax in a flesperate manner, chopping the 
pipe organ to pieces, and smashing the furniture in 
general. By the greatest efforts of policemen, who 
were suinmoned, he was overpowered, the ax taken 
from him and he was safely landed in the hospital. 
He was shot in the head somehow during the trouble, 
from which it is thought he will recover. They es- 
timate the damage sustained was about $1500. 

Out of the one hundred thousand children, under 
fourteen years of age, in Boston, nearly nine thousand 
do not attend any school. 

♦ * * 

One of the piers of the Santa Fe bridge at San 
Francisco, Cal., has been wrecked by the action of a 
recent series of earthquakes. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

A TREATY of arbitration between the United States 
and Italy was signed by Secretary Hay and the Italian 
ambassador Moron Mayor Des Planches. 

♦ * * 

Charleston, W. Va., adds pne more to the long 
list of disasters for 1904. In the giving way of the 
suspension bridge, thirty children, six teams and driv- 
ers who were on the bridge, at the time, were dropped 
into the water. Several bodies have been recovered, 
but the exact number of lives lost will not be known 
for some time. 

♦ * * 

Miss Achah M. Ely, professor of mathematics at 
Vassar college, died recently of apoplexy. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



17 



The battleship Massachusetts is lying at the League 
Island navy yards. Several of the men were working 
in her engine rooms, repairing the vessel, when a man- 
hole blew out, killing four men instantly and injur- 
ing several others. ■ •• 

♦ ♦ * 

With a trolley towing plant established on the 
banks of the Nile to draw dahabiyehs (canal boats) to 
and fro, the modernization of Egypt may be consid- 
ered as tolerably complete. The forty centuries which, 
as Napoleon told his soldiers, stood on the top of the 
pyramid looking at them as they marched past, are, 
no doubt, still there, keeping their long vigil, but what- 
ever may have gone by beneath them, they have never 
yet looked forth on an electric trolley and towing 
apparatus to multiply from ten to thirty times or more 
the flotillas and commerce of the Nile, exceeding all 
the efforts of Amentohep or Psammenitus. The ap- 
paratus may not be so spectacular as the pyramids, 
but it promises to be much more useful to Egypt. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

It is reported that an eastern syndicate, represent- 
ing seven hundred millions, is seeking control of ev- 
ery telephone appliance factory in the country. The 
Interstate Independent Telephone Association of 
America is taking steps of precaution to prevent such 
an action. It is to be hoped that matters will so ad- 
just themselves that air and sunshine will be left out 

of the combination. 

^ ^ 4> 

The trusts may control the ice trade in the summer 
time, when only the rich can enjoy this luxury, but 
they have been unable to pass any decision to keep the 
poor from enjoying it in the winter. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The failure of the Oberlin bank has greatly embar- 
rassed a number of students of the college at that place, 
who had money deposited in said bank. Their hold- 
ings are said to aggregate $25,000. 

♦ ♦ * 

The worst fire in the history of Minneapolis recent- 
ly occurred in which $16,000,000 worth of damage 
was done. 

<► •* ♦ 

The oldest ship in the American navy, the frigate 
Constellation, has recently been thoroughly overhauled 
and recommissioned at the Brooklyn navy yards. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Many bookstores have been opened in Moscow and 
St. Petersburg by Count Tolstoi where books can be 
had by the poor people at a very cheap rate. He also 
contemplates opening libraries for the accommodation 
of the poor. This sort of education will be hard on 
Russia's ignorance and superstition. 



A LATE census of the city of Berlin shows that they 
have upwards of 2,000,000 population, exclusive of 

the adjoining suburbs which contains 750,000 persons. 

* 4> ♦ 

Captain Mills of the American Liner, Philadel- 
phia, has protested against reckless target practice 
off Plymouth. He says that on approaching the har- 
bor, for the safety of the passengers and crew, he was 
compelled sometimes to stop and other times to sail 
under full head to avoid disaster. 

* ♦ * 

William Cornell Greene, known as " the copper 
king of Mexico," is rated as the largest land owner 
in America. His holdings in Arizona and in the state 
of Sonora, Mexico, amount to 2,000,000 acres, includ- 
ing some of the most valuable copper-producing land 
on the continent. It was while raising cattle in Ari- 
zona that he became interested in some mines which 
Senator Clarke of Montana and other big copper men 
refused to purchase. The products turned out to 
be enormously rich, and now Greene is many times a 
millionaire. 

* * ♦ 

Pennsylvania, which makes more than half of the 
iron used in the United States, produces less than two 
per cent of the iron ore mined. Ohio, which comes 
next to Pennsylvania as an iron-maker, mines less than 
o.i per cent of the total. In both cases the ore is 
brought to the fuel ; and this is the policy in this coun- 
try. Only in Alabama are the ore and fuel found 
together. 

* ♦ ♦ 

The great Simplon tunnel under the Alps consists 
in reality of two tunnels or tubes, the object being 
by this form of construction to provide for ventilation, 
the trains in each tube moving only one way and thus 
acting as a piston in forcing out dead air and sucking 
in fresh supplies. Fans are also used, and by this 
means it is expected that the tunnel will be perfectly 
ventilated. Similar plans are being carried out by the 
Pennsylvania railroad tunnel under the Hudson. 
These are facts that may have an important bearing 
in solving the problem of ventilation in the subway. 
It probably would be possible at- comparatively small 
expense to make partitions between the various lines 
in the tunnel and thus make them ventilating tubes. 
Reenforced by electric fans, these fans ought to solve 
the air problem of the subway. 

* * ■* 

A BLIZZARD, going at the rate of seventy-two miles 
an hour, passed over the North Central states Tues- 
day night, doing great damage to telephone and tele- 
graph wires which was a great hindrance to news dis- 
patchers. 



18 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




There are nettles everywhere, 

But smooth, green grasses are common still; 

The blue heaven is larger than a cloud. 

— Mrs. Browning. 
4> 4> 4> 

MAKING PATENT LEATHER. 



Japanned leather, generally called patent leather, 
was first made in America. A smooth glazed finish 
is first given to calfskin in France. The leather is 
curried expressly for this purpose, and particular care 
is taken to keep it as free as possible from grease. The 
skins are then tacked on frames and coated with a com- 
position of linseed oil and umber in the proportion of 
i8 gallons of oil to five of umber, boiled until nearly 
solid and then mixed with spirits of turpentine to 
the proper consistency. -Lampblack is also added 
when the composition is applied in order to give color 
and body. From three to four coats of this are nec- 
essary to form a substance to receive the varnish. 
They are laid on with a knife or scraper. To render 
the goods soft and pliant each coat must be very light 
and thoroughly dried after each application. A thin 
coat is afterward applied of the same composition of 
proper consistency, to be put on with a brush and with 
sufficient lampblack boiled in it to make a perfect 
black. When thoroughly dry it is cut down with a 
scraper having turned edges, when it is ready to var-' 
nish. 

The principal varnish used is made of linseed oil 
and Russian blue, boiled to the thickness of printer's 
ink. It is reduced with spirits of turpentine to a suit- 
able consistency to work with a brush, and then ap- 
plied in two or three separate coats, which are scraped 
and pumiced until the leather is perfectly filled and 
smooth. The finishing coat is put on with special 
care in a room kept closed and with the floor wet to pre- 
vent dust. The frames are then run into an oven 
heated to about 175 degrees. 

♦ ♦ * 
COTTON PICKING. 



Cotton picking to-day is much what it was a century 
ago. There has been no gain or improvement in the 
method. The slave darkey of ante-bellum days could 
pick as many pounds of cotton as the free darkey of to- 
day. A fair average day's work for a picker is about 
100 pounds of seed cotton. Allowing 130 days for the 
harvesting season, each picker working steadily would 



thus gather 13,000 pounds of seed cotton as his share 
of work. In 1903 the total Southern cotton crop 
amounted to 10,205,073 bales, which was only a 
slight increase over the average for the past five years. 
To gather such a crop within the harvesting season 
of 130 days, it would therefore require 1,088,000 la- 
borers if each one picked his quota of 100 pounds of 
seed cotton per day. The cost of paying this army 
of pickers at current market wages in the South would 
amount to more than 10 per cent of the total value of 
the whole crop. According to statistics last year the 
amount paid for picking the crop approximated $70, 
750,000. What other crop in the country requires 
such enormous expenditures for gathering? Not even 
the tea crop of China and India, where picking is done 
entirely by hand, equals this stupendous item. The to- 
bacco and sugar cane crop likewise must be gathered 
by hand, and no adequate machinery for harvesting 
them has yet been invented ; but in their case nothing 
like ten per cent of the total valuation of the crop is 
expended in the harvesting. The fiber of the cotton 
plant is the wing of the seed, and it is soft and fleecy, 
ready to be blown away by the wind. To pick this 
fiber requires expert manipulation of the hands that can 
separate it from the boll without injuring the fiber it- 
self. The gathering of the cotton from the boll with 
the fingers is not difficult, but to invent machinery to 
do this is complicated. — Scientific American. 
* ♦ ■* 
STOOPING. 



Stooping habits and round shoulders are sometimes, 
or indeed, often treated by mothers bracing back the 
shoulders by means of straps. Now, an authority on 
the treatment of deformities has lately been decrying 
the use of such things. He says they weaken the 
muscles which connect the shoulder blades to the body, 
and when the straps are taken off the muscles in front 
of the body tend to pull forward the chest 'and make 
the deformity worse. There is great reason and 
sense in this view of matters and mothers should, there- 
fore, be very cautious in their use of all such appli- 
ances. If a girl or boy has a tendency to stoop, the 
habit should be corrected by proper gymnastic exer- 
cises and by the drill which is now practiced in every 
well ordered school. It is a much more satisfactory 
thing to correct a habit gradually, by proper use of 
the muscles, than to bind up one set of muscles to their 
detriment. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January ;i, 1905. 



19 



NUTRITIVE VALUE OF FOODS. 



In twenty pounds of potatoes there are three and 
three-fourths pounds of nutriment ; in twenty-five cents 
worth of fat salt pork there are three and one-half 
pounds of nutriment ; in the same "value of wheat 
bread there are two and one-fourth pounds ; in the 
neck of beef, one ond three-fourths pounds ; in skim 
milk cheese, one and three-fourth pounds ; in whole 
milk cheese a trifle more than one and one half pounds ; 
in butter, one and one-half pounds, and in smoked ham 
and leg" mutton about the same ; in milk a trifle over 
I pound ; in mackerel, about i pound ; in round of 
beef, three-fourths of a pound ; in salt codfish and beef 
sirloin, about one-half of a pound ; in eggs, at twenty- 
five cents a dozen, about seven ounces, and in fresh cod- 
fish, about six ounces. A quart of milk, three-fourths 
of a pound moderately fat beef,, sirloin steak, for in- 
stance, and five ounces of wheat flour, all contain 
about the same amount of nutritive material; but we 
pay different prices for them, and they have different 
value for nutriment. Milk comes nearest to being 
perfect food. It contains all of the different kinds 
of nutritive materials that the body needs. Bread 
made from the wheat flour will support life. It con- 
tains all of the necessary ingredients for nourishment, 
but not in the proportions best adapted for ordinary 
use. 

*S> ■$* ^I* 

VALUE OF APPLES. 

Apples, in addition to being a delicious fruit, make 
a pleasant and valuable medicine. A raw apple is 
digestible in an hour and a half, while boiled cab- 
bage requires five hours. The most healthy dessert that 
can be placed on a table is a baked apple. If eaten 
frequently at breakfast, with bread and butter, with- 
out meat of any kind, it has an admirable effect on the 
general system, often removing constipation, correct- 
ing acidities and cooling off febrile conditions more 
effectually than the most approved medicines. If fam- 
ilies could be induced to substitute apples, ripe and 
sound, for pies, cakes and sweetmeats, with which 
their children are frequently stuffed, there would be 
a diminution in the total sum of doctors' bills, in a 
single year, sufficient to lay in stock of this delicious 
fruit for the whole season's use. 
<J> ^ ♦> 
WHAT IDLENESS DOES. 



Many young people think an idle life must be a 
pleasant one, but there are none who enjoy life so 
little and are such burdens to themselves as those who 
have nothing to do. Those who are obliged to work 
hard all day enjoy their short period of rest and recre- 
ation so much that they are apt to think that if their 



whole life were spent in rest and recreation it would be 
the most pleasant of all. But this is a sad mistake 
as they would soon find out if they made a trial of the 
life they think so agreeable. One who is never busy 
can never enjoy rest, for rest implies relief from previ- 
ous labors ; and if our wbole time were spent in amus- 
ing ourselves, we should find it more wearisome than 
the hardest day's work. Recreation is only valuable 
as it unbends us ; the idle can know nothing of it. 
Many people leave off business and settle down to a 
life of enjoyment, but they generally find that they are 
not nearly so happy as they were before, and are often 
glad to return to their old occupation to escape the 
miseries of indolence.^ — Sd. 

^ ^ '^ 

OLD SOUTHERN REMEDIES. 



What is one man's food is another man's poison, 
but it is vouched for by an old Southerner that the 
following remedies will benefit seven out of ten persons : 

For alcoholism try buttermilk. It will kill desire 
for whisky. 

Whey will greatly relieve dropsy. 

Calomel applied to cuts or sores relieves pain and 
heals wounds. Not too much and don't get wet. 

Kerosene will cure sore throat. Consumptives should 
try it. Take a tablespoonful at a time. Hold the nose. 

Bathing head in cold water every morning will pre- 
vent one from taking colds easily. Better commence 
in the summer time. 

Ice applied between the shoulders and back of head 
will stop bleeding at the nose. 

Balsam apple applied to dog bite will carry relief. 

Keep cut onions in all sick rooms. Onions will turn 
black where contagious diseases exist and disinfect 
the room. 

Try cold water for tired feet. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

The moral coward — the man who is afraid of life, 
afraid of its depths and its heights, its valleys of hu- 
miliation and its peaks of vision, its significant exper- 
iences of whatever kind — is incapable of developing 
character. All these are the ripening experiences of 
the soul. We must expect them, as the apple expects 
the noonday blaze and the midnight frost. It is child- 
ish to shrink from the intensities of life. Why do we 
live if not to meet life's requirements and bear its 
fruits ? — James Buchanan. 

4> ♦ ♦ 
It is a good plan to give the orchard an annual 
pruning from the beginning. If it is not given, es- 
pecially during the first stage of growth, some of the 
limbs will become crowded and others will grow mis- 
shaped, and there will be an increased difficulty in se- 
curing a good shaped tree afterwards. 



20 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



• ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»»»»»»» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 



i: Reading Circle and Christian Workers' Topics i: 



By EI^IZABETH S. BOSENBEBGEB 

>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 



CIRCLE AND CHRISTIAN WORKERS' PROGRAM. 



Sunday, January 15. 

Topic. — Ask, Seek, Find. 

Text. — For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that 
seeketh, findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be 
opened. Matthew 7: 7, 8. 

References. 

I John 5: 14; Matthew 14: 20; Acts 4: 31 ; James 
5: 17; Luke 18: 1-5; Psalm 145: 18; Luke i: 1-13; 
Matthew 21: 22; Luke 11: 13; Matthew 18: 19, 20; 
Matthew 6: 5-9; John 16: 23-27; Hebrews 4: 16; 
Psalms 40: I. 

"The Soul's Sincere Desire." 

There is no doubt about it, we have all at some time 
or other so earnestly desired something that it was easy 
to take it to the Lord in prayer ; and sometimes we were 
given our heart's desire ; and at other times we thought 
that God neither heard nor answered our prayers. We 
used to be puzzled about it when we were younger, 
before we knew that it was not best to arrive at con- 
clusions too soon in regard to our prayers. Our part 
lies in being true and sincere, and then waiting patient- 
ly, trusting God and believing. We should remember 
too that the great men and women of to-day are those 
who take time to pray, who put prayer first. There 
are two parts in prayer ; first, there is God who is able 
and willing to give us the richest gifts, and just as 
surely there must be as the second factor, the person 
who is willing to receive. God never crowds, nor 
compels us to accept things ; but there must be an open 
hand and heart and life through which God can give 
what he longs to give us. 

One Prayer Answered. 

It was at an obscure little church in England that the 
subject of a revival meeting was discussed. A poor 
shoemaker and his wife, who could not attend church 
regularly, because of ill health, were yet much con- 
cerned about their neighbors' welfare. So for weeks 
before the revival began these two prayed earnestly 
every day that God would bring conviction to the 
hearts of their friends and convert them. When the 
meetings began, there was but a small attendance and 
no interest, but in a few evenings the Holy Spirit 
came in all his power, and many souls turned to Christ. 
The shoemaker had the joy of knowing that every 
soul for which he prayed, had responded to the call, 
and was rejoicing in the Lord. 



Prayer of John Knox. 
Some one overheard John Knox, the Scotch reform- 
er, praying for his country, " O Lord, give me Scot- 
land, or I die," he said. Again and again he made this 
petition, on his bended knees. And God did give him 
Scotland, religious liberty was assured, and the bonds 
of intolerance and superstition were broken. 

Our Daily Bread. 

We repeat it often, " Give us this day our daily 
bread." And the promise is, " Ask and ye shall re- 
ceive," yet more of us say, " Give us this day our daily 
bread," expecting that a loaf will be placed right in 
our hands as soon as we are done praying. Yet we 
sometimes act as if we expected some of our other 
prayers to be answered that way. God gives us en- 
ergy and muscle and understanding so that in some 
way we can procure the loaf of bread. And God ex- 
pects us always to do our part towards answering our 
own prayers. 

Once when Jesus met some people who were coming 
to talk with him, he asked, " What seek ye ? " And 
He asks us the same question while he holds for us 
the richest gifts. And then we ask him for some lit- 
tle trifling things, when he is longing to give us won- 
derful blessings. The disciples in the upper room 
put the will of God above everything else, and Pente- 
cost came of that prayer. 

Pray About It. 

"Have we trials and temptations? 
Is there trouble anywhere? 
Jesus knows our every weakness. 
Take it to the Lord in prayer." 

Is there any trouble, is there anything that worries 
you, and yet you feel that it is too small a matter to 
pray about? Just remember that if it is a matter of 
sufficient importance to worry you, you can pray about 
it. Talk about it to Jesus just as you used to talk 
to your mother about your childish troubles ; and 
then thank him for the help he gives you. 

Topics for Discussion. 

1. Jesus answered one prayer on the cross. Luke 

23 : 41-43- 

2. Confessing our sins to God. Judges 10: 10-15; 
Job 7 : 20. 

3. Why should we observe Family Prayer? Acts 
10: 2. 

4. Thank God for his blessings. Eph. i: 15, 16; 
Luke 25: 53. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



21 



BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT. 



Sister Mary E. Shickel of Broadway, Virginia, says, 
" I have read all the books in our former Missionary 
course, excepting a part of one, and I rea4 seven books 
out of the older courses. I am now reading ' India, 
a Problem,' and consider it fine. A few weeks ago, 
I went to Bridgewater to hear Dr. Forest lecture ; he 
has been a missionary in India and his talk on ' The 
Hurt of India ' was very interesting. I will be 
pleased to receive my certificate." 

The Circle wants to help. We used to discuss the 
matter of supporting our own missionary, but we have 
learned that there are so many places where a little 
assistance at the right time is required, that we have 
determined to help every good work so far as we can. 
Supporting orphans, in India, and giving money to 
assist in building orphanages was part of our work 
in the past. This is still necessary. How much can 
we do this year? 

" Uncle John, won't you come to the meeeting this 
evening?" 

" O, I guess not, I am getting too old for Young 
Peoples' meetings." 

" But we want you there too, we want the older 
members of the church too," went on the pleading 
voice of a young sister. And she was right; in these 
meetings where our boys and girls do most of the talk- 
ing and singing and praying, we want the older mem- 
bers too. The young people appreciate your presence, 
the meeting is more interesting, and if the elder or 
one of the deacons can give a two-minute talk before 
the meeting closes, into which he crowds love, sym- 
pathy, and encouragement, it will prove to be another 
bond uniting the bid and the young members of our 
church. Loyalty and love one for another go hand in 
hand. Our young people should attend all the general 
services of the church and our older brethren should 
find time to attend the Circle and Christian Workers' 
meetings. 

Sister Mary R. Hoover of Spencer, Ohio, says, 
" May grace, mercy and peace be with all of the house- 
hold of faith. I am glad to be able to send even one 
name every now and then; of course I would be glad 
to send more, but even one who will become interested 
in carrying out the great commission is that much gain 
for Christ." 

Brother Henry E. Ward, from Overbrook, Kansas, 
sends us good news, " The spirit of missions is growing 
and moving upon members of the Circle at this place. 
Several have read the greater part of the first year's 
course. We are laboring to increase our membership, 
and hope that we will soon be able to support a mis- 
sionary in some field; we feel that we want to obey 
Christ's command. I am glad to send you twenty- 



seven new names. Brother Charles M. Ward is pres- 
ident, Brother Charles O. Hoover, secretary. Brother 
John H. Oxley treasurer, and Henry E. Ward, local 
secretary." 

(Go and do likewise, for your church needs just such 
a Circle.) 

Brother Charles A. Bame of Dayton, Ohio, met 
with the Circle at Covington, Ohio. The church was 
filled, and the interest intense, while Brother Bame 
spoke to them on " God's Greatest Question." He re- 
ferred to some great questions puzzling the minds of 
scholars and scientists, then he said the greatest ques- 
tion is the one asked centuries ago, — " What think 
ye of Christ ? " The whole address was a masterly 
plea for the young people to increase their faith, and 
their love for Jesus of Nazareth. Brother Bame has 
also given this address before the Y. M. C. A. of 
Dayton. 



NEW NAMES. 



2S68 
2569 
2570 
2571 
2S72 
2S73 
2574 
2575 
2576 
2577 
2578 
2579 
2580 
2581 
2582 
2583 
2584 
2585 
2586 
2587 
2588 
2589 
2590 
2591 
2592 
2593 
2594 
2595 
2596 
2597 
2598 
2599 



Russel Hankins, R. D. No. 1, Bringhurst, Indiana. 

Frank Holsinger, Flora, Indiana. 

Delia Holsinger, Flora, Indiana. 

Vesta Myers, Flora, Indiana. 

Mrs. Philip Kingery, Flora, Indiana. 

Charles M. Ward, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Charles O. Hoover, Overbrook, Kansas. 

John H. Oicley, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Henry E. Ward, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Stephen Ward, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Calvin Ward, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Ezra A. Ward, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Sarah A. Ward, Overbrook, Kansas. 

B. O. Hoover, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Clarence Hoover, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Lloyd Hoover, Overbrook, Kansas. 

M. E. Hoover, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Otis Hoover, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Lizzie Postma, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Dessie Postma, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Clara Postma, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Allie Kinzie, Overbrook, Kansas. 

William A. Kinzie, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Elva Miller, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Myrtle Hilky, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Callie Hertzog, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Ida Metzker, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Alice Davidson, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Grace Badsky, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Jessie Badsky, Overbrook, Kansas. 

Bertha Behrens, Overbrook, Kansas. 

H. W. Behrens, Overbrook, Kansas. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
RECEIVED CERTIFICATES. 



Mary L. Cook, Prairie Depot, Ohio. 
A. G. Crosswhite, Flora, Ind. 
Fannie Myers, Flora, Ind. 
Mrs. E. E. Blickenstaff, Flora, Ind. 
Myrtle Cline, Flora, Ind. 
Josephine Hanna, Flora, Ind. 
Mary E. Shickel, Broadway, Va, 



22 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 




OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 




GEOGRAPHY CLASS.— Chapter IX. 



Cork, Ireland. 
Dear Mr. Maxwell: — 

Agnes was taken sick day before yesterday and since 
Marie has to act the part of nurse, Miss Merritt suggested 
that we boys must write this letter; that's one of the things 
we didn't expect to do, but there are so many things that 
we see over here that I think would be of interest to 
you that girls and women don't known anything about; 
and I believe we'll take advantage of this opportunity. 

We sent the girls from Queenstown to Cork on the 
train and Roscoe and I came on a "johnny car," as they 
call it here. The right name for it is " jaunting car." 
. If I can get a snapshot of one of those vehicles I'll 
send you a picture; they look a good deal like 
a two-wheeled cart which we have at home, except that 
they have a seat on each side, over the wheel; each one 
of these seats holds two passengers who must necessarily 
face the side of the road. The driver sits in front, almost 
astride the horse, with his feet on the shafts. There are 
no other vehicles in Ireland, no top buggies, no car- 
riages, in fact, no four-wheeled vehicles of any sort; even 
the drays are built after the pattern of the jaunting car. 

As we came along the road we noticed that it was a fine 
macadamized highway. In fact, all the roads we have 
seen in Ireland so far are of the best stone roads we 
have ever seen. At the side of the road you invariably 
find a stone wall, in most cases whitewashed and over- 
hung with laurel or bay-leaf, with an occasional weeping- 
willow. The land is undulating, not enough so as to be 
mountainous, but picturesque. And as Ross said yester- 
day, " There is a valley between every two hills." On 
the top of many of these hills are to be seen ruins of 
old castles that have been there for centuries, and to see 
these dotted over the hill tops, clad in their garments 
of gray, overlooking the green hills mirrored in the crystal 
bosom of scores of lakes is a scene that is simply entranc- 
ing. 

To make a deeper setting for this picture, let me sug- 
gest that you imagine an occasional farmhouse, which is 
invariably laid of stone or brick and the ever present 
whitewash, covered with a thatched roof, " and de ol-fash- 
ioned chimney at de end." Of course none of these 
houses are built in more than one story. When they 
need more room than is furnished by a single apartment 
they join another one to that, and it is a fact that 

" They kept the pig in the parlor 
And that was Irish too." 

Ross and I nearly die laughing sometimes as we ride 
along the road, for. almost every time we pass one of 
these farmhouses three or four little freckled-faced, bare- 
headed, half-clad descendants of Erin follow us at the 
top of their speed, in the cloud of dust made by the johnny 
car, crying at the top of their voice, " Tuppens-hapeny- 
fur-a-scramble-sur," which translated into the United 
States would be, " Two pence half-penny for a scramble, 
sir." One penny is two cents in our money and is about 



as big as one of those old-fashioned coppers Pa used to 
have, and of course two pennies would be four cents and 
the " hapeny " is a half-pence, which is one cent in our 
money. All figured, " Tuppens-hapeny " would be a nick- 
el. So these children were really saying, " Throw a 
nickel down in the dust just to see us scramble for it 
and to see who will get it." 

We amused ourselves for miles by occasionally throw- 
ing a penny or " hapeny '' in the dust. It is fun alive to 
see our girls count their money when they go shopping; 




JOHNNY CAR. 

they try to convert everything into United States money. 
While Ross and I try to tell them all the time that they 
shall reckon in pounds, shillings and pence. 

Miss Merritt has a quarter, a dime ftid a penny in the 
United States money in her chatelaine. Almost every day 
she takes these out and looks at them and reminds us 
that she doesn't want to forget what real money looks 
like. 

It is too bad that none of us are given to art. I would 
like to sketch for you some of these farmers with a jag 
of hay about as big as a boy could carry with a rope, on 
one of these double length johnny cars with a little donkey 
hitched to it, not much bigger than a Kansas jack rabbit, 
and working in a field containing not more than a quarter 
of an acre, and stacking the hay in cocks instead of 
stacks. 

By the way I was going to tell you that when we took 
the girls to the depot at Queenstown to come to Cork, 
we had a time getting their tickets. In the first place we 
couldn't find the ticket office. Finally Miss Merritt saw 
a sign above the door that said " Booking office," and sug- 
gested that that might be the place. We weren't abroad 
to be baffled by trifles, so we bolted in and put on a brazen 
front and called for three tickets to Cork. " Faith, and 
whut class duz yez want?" said the Celt behind the desk. 
Ross pulled down one corner of his old slouch hat, shut 
his left eye and whispered, " You're up against it, ain't you, 
Ock?" The Celtic blood rushing through his veins car- 
(Continued on Page 24.) 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



23 



^ 



r 






Why do tempting dishes make the mouth water? 

In the Journal de Psycholegie, M. Mayer treats of 
the influence of the mind on bodily secretions. We 
know that a tempting morsel of food makes the 
" mouth water," and that stories or memories can 
bring tears to the eyes. Observations on dogs have 
shown that the nature of the saliva secreted at the 
sight of food depends on the nature of the food. The 
stomach secretions of the dog are also excited by the 
sight of the food. Some dogs, however, of a "cold, 
positive temperment," not illusioned by chimeras or 
what is out of reach, patiently wait until the food 
comes to their gullet before their mouths water or 
the gastric juices are provoked. It is assumed that 
what holds for dogs probably holds for men. The 
observations appear to show the importance of eating 
food that pleases and avoiding what displeases or 
disgusts. They also run counter to the psycholog- 
ical theory of the emotions according to which the 
psychological phenomena are caused by organic 
changes. This may be the case with some emotions, 
for example the feeling of hunger, but for emotions 
properly so called, it is rather the other way about. 

* ^ 4' 

What was the Star Route fraud? 

Star routes are those mail routes which are marked 
with a star in the postal route books. On them the 
mail is carried on horseback or wagons, owing to lack 
of railroad or steamboat facilities. In i88i it was 
charged that there was a " ring " to defraud the gov- 
ernment, and in 1882 a number of officials, including 
United States Senator Stephen W. Dorsey, Second 
Assistant Postmaster General Thomas J. Brady and 
others were arrested. It was charged that they con- 
spired to obtain contracts for one hundred and thirty- 
four star routes at^ $143,169, and then had the com- 
pensation increased to $662,808 by increasing the num- 
ber of trips beyond what the localities required and 
by claims of faster time on the trips. Some of the 
prisoners were found guilty and some acquitted. The 
trials lasted over a year, and ended in a statement by 
the Department of Justice that no Government of- 
ficials were in volved in the frauds. 

4> * * 

How can I secure a copyright on a word or phrase to 
be used for advertising purposes? 

Apply to the library of Congress, Washington, D. 
C., and enclose fifty cents for recording the copyright 
and fifty cents additional for a certificate 



Were it possible for a hole to be drilled directly 
through the center of the earth, and were an iron ball 
dropped through this aperture, would it stop as soon as 
it reached the center of the earth, or would it oscillate 
until it finally stopped at center? 

This is absolutely a matter of theory : no practical 
test could be made. First, the earth could not be pen- 
etrated because of distance, rotation, molten interior, 
and water. Second, it would be impossible to drop any 
substance a distance of four thousand miles, which 
would be the minimum in this instance, without fric- 
tion sufficient to raise the temperature to melting point. 
But laying aside all practical possibilities for the ad- 
vantage of theory, the Nook is in favor of the theory 
that the ball would not stop at the center, but would 
pass by the center and oscillate until it would finally 
seek a place of equal resistance and attraction, which, 
of course would be the center of the earth. This theo- 
ry is true provided momentum assists gravity in gain- 
ing velocity. If gravity alone is responsible for 
the mad flight of the body in question, theoretically, 
it would stop immediately upon reaching the center. 

* * * 

If two bricks were dropped through the air, one on top 
of the other, the top brick weighing three pounds when at 
rest, would the top brick, in the fall, push down with 
the three pounds of weight on the lower brick while they 
are falling?. 

That depends entirely upon the consistency, size and ^ 
shape of the two bricks. If the specific gravity of the 
under brick is not so great as the upper one, and fur- 
nishes more resistance, then of necessity the top brick 
would assist the other in falling by the addition of 
its weight. If the top brick is larger than the lower 
one, or has a peculiar shape, which will furnish resist- 
ance, it might even detract from the power of gravity 
of the lower one, but if the two bricks are of the same 
size, shape and density they will have no effect one up- ' 
on the other. However, the top brick will be inclined 
to rest upon or near the lower brick, because the lower 
brick displaces the air in front of the upper one so 
that it is not necessary for the second one to submit 
such a degree of resistance as the lower one. 

* ♦ * 

Who was the first Postmaster General of the United 
States? 

Samuel Osgood, of Massachusetts, who was appoint- 
ed by Washington in 1784. 

* * * 

To whom can I send mineral water to have it analyzed? 
To any analytical chemist. 



24 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 3, 1905. 



V-*»* ♦I* V V V V V"*?*" 



♦ 
I 
t 



i**J*^*vvV*^ 



* 
* 






nx/EISCEXjL-^D^E 



* 







ried an inspiration in the form of a suggestion to his witty 
brain that we were from " the land of the free and the 
home of the brave." And he gave vent to his feelings by 
saying, "Air yez furm Amolicky?" Ross fairly snorted 
in my face, and of course I had to pull my chin down 
long and admit his proposition. Then he explained, 
at some length, that first-class passage would be three 
cents a mile; second-class, two cents; third-class, one 
cent, and fourth-class cheaper yet. At this juncture the 
girls became sufficiently interested that they took part 
in the inquiries, and we deduced a few facts. We found 
that the first-class accommodations were about like our 
finest parlor cars in America, second-class like our or- 
dinary coaches, third-class something like a caboose and 
fourth-class like a box car. with no seats. 

This being the terminal of the railroad we were afforded 
the opportunity of examining one of these coaches. The 
coaches are built the shape of ours at home, only they don't 
have doors in the ends. There are three partitions across 
the coach, which divide the coach into four separate 
apartments, entirely disconnected with each other. One 
of these apartments is finished for ten first-class passen- 
gers, the next for second, the next for third, and the 
fourth apartment is set apart for those who smoke, and 
you may rest assured that this one is always full. So the 
difference in the fare only means a difference in accom- 
modations and not that anything is gained in point of 
time. The girls chose third-class, and rode the entire 
distance, sixteen miles, for 8d (eight pence — sixteen 
cents). 

We wished afterwards that we had taken a boat and 
sailed up the river Lee. The scenery is simply delight- 
ful, but we got to see some of it from the johnny car. 
We may make a round trip yet when Agnes gets over 
her homesickness, for I think that is all that is the matter 
with her. 

We arrived in Cork in due time and found the girls 
waiting there for us at the depot. The hotels were all 
full on account of an exposition in the city, and we finally 
succeeded in getting lodging with a Mr. Fitzpatrick, one 
of the railroad officials, at No. 8 Hackett's Terrace. We 
ate supper at a dirty Irish restaurant. The girls were a 
little inclined to stick up their noses, but Agnes slowly 
said, without a smile, " You might as well walk up to the 
rack and take your fodder." We teased each other with 
asking to have the butter passed, which thing was wholly 
wanting. 

By the way, I must close this letter and make arrange- 
ments for to-morrow's itinerary. By proxy, 

Oscar and Roscoe. 

P. S. — Miss Gertrude is preparing an article for the 

Mayville Times. 

(To be Continued.) 

♦ * * 

We are not sent into this world to do anything into 
which we can not put our hearts. — John Ruskin. 



SOME THINGS WE NEVER SEE. 



A sheet from the bed of a river, 

A tongue from the mouth of a stream 
A toe from the foot of a mountain, 

A page from a volume of steam. 
.A wink from the eye of a needle, 

A nail from the finger of fate; 
A plume from the wing of an army, 

And a drink from the bar of a grate. 
A hair from the head of a hammer, 

A bite from the teeth of a saw, 
A race on the course of study. 

And a joint from the limb of the law. 
A check that is drawn on a sand-bank, 

Some fruit from the jamb of a door. 

* * * 
FIGHT WITH A BIG WILD CAT. 



Farmer John Hillegas, of Sigmund, Penn., dis- 
covered that a dozen of his chickens had been killed 
during the night, and set out with a hound to seek the 
marauder. The hound soon ran down a wild cat, and 
after a furious battle went home with his tail between 
his legs. 

Hillegas returned to the scene of the dog's defeat 
and found the cat perched in a tree. He fired at it, 
and the cat leaped on his shoulders,, sinking its teeth 
and claws into his flesh. He shook it off and tried to 
strike it with the gun, but only succeeded in breaking 
the rifle in two, and the cat promptly made a spring 
for his throat. Warding it off with his arm, he finally 
succeeded in striking it with the barrel of the rifle and 
breaking its back. A second blow beat out the 
animal's brains. The cat weighed 12 pounds. 

* * * 

SLOW TRAINS IN SPAIN. 



Trains in Spain are certainly slow. A rate of 
10 or 12 miles an hour is considered a good average of 
speed for every day travelers. When the Spanish 
officials wish to show visiting foreigners what they 
really can accomplish in the way of rapidity, they 
offer express trains which dash madly across the land- 
scape at an average rate of 15 or 18 miles an hour. 
In one way this proves an advantage, for the trav- 
eler sees a great deal more scenery for his money than 
if he were rushed past it swiftly. 



Good Land Cheap 



Let us sell you farming land where the soil is pro- 
ductive and the crops dependable ; where we have no 
drouths or failures; where grasshoppers are not; where 
we have few storms and no destructive winds; where 
products are greatly diversified; where the markets are 
as good as they are easily reached; where the climate 
is uniform and salubrious; where you will be cordially 
welcomed and helped along. We state without fear of 
contradiction that we have the best land at the least 
money, possessing more advantages and fewer draw- 
backs, than can be found in this country to-dij. A few 
years' time is all that is necessary to prove that we are 
in one of the most productive areas for fruit, root crops 
and live stock. The possibilities are here, largely un- 
developed as yet; all that we want is the people. Those 
we are getting are the right kind, your own kind, and 
the country will soon be dotted with green fields and 
cosy homes. Don't get the idea that you are going to a 
wilderness; not at all; on the contrary, we have sold 
lands in our BRETHREN COLONY to over 120 fam- 
ilies, nearly half of whom are already on the ground, 
others coming next spring. In the vicinity of BRETHREN, MICHIGAN, we have 
thousands of acres of productive soil, splendidly adapted for fruit, root and vegetable 
crops and live stock, at prices from $7 per acre upwards, on easy terms. Our lands are 
sold to actual settlers. 

BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, BRETHREN, MICH., 

is Resident Agent in charge of the work at our Brethren Colony. It will only cost you a 
postal card to drop him a line for our illustrated booklet, entitled " The Brethren Colony 
in the Fruit Belt of Michigan." This will give you an accurate idea of the lands and all 
conditions surrounding them The booklet contains letters giving the opinion of many 

Every statement can be borne out by facts. 




The basis of my business Is absolute and 
unvarying integrity. 

SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Founder of the Brethren Colony, Brethren, Mich. 



Brethren in regard to our lands and work 



- Reduced rates will be furnished homeseekers desiring to look our country over and 
every opportunity wnll be accorded them to conduct their investigations satisfactorily 
by Bro. Miller on their arrival at Brethren, Michigan. 

For booklet, information as to rates and ail details address: 



or 



SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Cadillac, Mich., 

DISTRICT AGENT RESIDENT AGENT 



BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, 
Brethren, Mich., 



THE INGLENOOK. 



Tf .95 




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ithorV itigh closet or reservoir. With 
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you can return it to us and we will parfrdghC both ways, so vou won 'tbeoutone ainglecent. 

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liberal terms and the lowest srices overmade. 

EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY CO., Chicago, III. 

20,000 INQUIRIES 

Would come pouring through our mail this week if 
all the Brethren understood just what we have. 



AN HONEST, EFFICIENT, ECONOMICAL LIGHTING 
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Acetylene Gas makes a beautiful, bright, white light. 
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BBETHBEN FUBIiISSIITO HOUSE, 
EliTin, Illinois. 



THE 

REEDLEY 
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The Gem of the San 
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»— • 

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State for all kinds of fruit and 
alfalfa. Good soil, low prices, 
abundant water, healthful climate, 
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Special inducements made to 
Brethren. Colony now forming. 
Write for booklet, and full informa- 
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Howard" Instructors are also published for Fife. Urom, 

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the: ingl-Einook 



MATTHEW HENRY 

COMMENTARY ON THE BIBLE 



i»h.ioe: csm-EiA-TiLiTr 3FLE:i>TJOEsaD. 



Catalogue 
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" There is nothing to be compared with old Matthew Henry's Commentary for pungent and practical applica- 
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We have now reduced the price of this commentary until it is within reach of all. Every minister and Bible 
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afford to let this offer pass without due consideration. P.etter send your order at once. Price, only $7.95. 

Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, Illinois. 



THE CRY OF THE TWO=THIRDS 

By MRS. S. R. GRAHAM-CLARK. 

A great story with a great purpose. It is a book 
for every family where there are boys and girls. 
It is as fascinating as it is powerful. It will be 
fead and reread and shape character and conduct 
for life. 

It has been called the " Uncle Tom's Cabin " of 
the liquor traffic. If you want your boys and girls 
to shun the evils of the liquor traffic get this beok 
for them to read. Do not wait until the horse is 
stolen before you lock the door. Order the book 
now. 

It contains 678 pages of clear type, laid paper, 
elegantly bound in handsome cloth, only $1.50. 

Address: 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, 111. 




The Inglenook 
COOK BOOK 



We have sent out thousands of 
these Cook Books as premiums. 
So great was the demand that a 
second edition was published. 
We are still receiving numerous 
calls for this Cook Book. For this 
reason we have decided to dispose 
of the few remaining copies at 
25 cents per copy. To insure a 
copy it will be necessary for you 
.rder at once. . . Send to 



\' 



it^TS 



BR^THSEIT FITBI.ISHTNG HOXTSE, 
Elgin, mtnots. 



$22.00 BUYS OUR "FAIRY QUEEN" CUTTER 



Bandsome, 




Here is an exceptional opportunity to obtain 
a very iiandsome and durable cutter at a won- 
derfully low price. It lias called forth admira- 
tion from everyone who has seen it. It is light 
and nobby in appearance, yet made of good ma- 
terial and guaranteed to give satisfactory service. 
You can not buy it from your dealer at anywhere 
near the price we asic. Body is large, roomy, and 
comfortable, with extra high back; made or the 
best air seasoned timber. All joints are rein- 
forced, screwed, glued and plugged. Gear is 
made of the best selected material, full braced 
and strongly Ironed; braces, bolts and clips from 
the best wrought steel, hand forged. Best grade 
hardened steel channel shoes, securely bolted 
to the runners. Painted In the high- 
est style of the art, highly polished, 
neatly striped and ornamented. 
Body black, or Brewster green with 
black mouldings. Gear black, green 
or carmine; fully striped. Uphol- 
stered in Portland Plush. Full 
spring back and spring cushion; 
cushion and back are removable; 
curved back with side wings and 
nickel plated dash rail and arm rails; 
neat foot steps and nicely trimmed 
shafts with shifting rail. 



*}• 'J' 'J* 'J' V V 'I' 'v '♦' '♦' '♦' '♦' 'I' 'I' u 



Keep Warm I 




Of the articles you would like to purchase 
and note the prices, and then turn to our 
No. 63 Catalogue and from our mam- 
moth stock select a list that will suit you 
in every way— and will save 50U from 
15 to 2<^ per cent. 

When You Buy 

direct from us you save all deal- 
ers' and middlemen's profit. We 
guarantee every purchase to be 
satisfactory — your money cheer- 
fully refunded if you wish It. We 
will appreciate the opportunity to 
send you our new catalogue free, 
with our compliments. Will you 
ask us for it now while you think 
•f it? A postal will do. 




Wear one of our heavy fleece- 
lined coats and be comfortable 
even on the coldest days. We 
have many different kinds of zero 
weather coats at prices far lower 
than you can buy the same qual- 
ity for at retail stores. 

Our heavy black dnck ooat, dark 
tanned sheepskin lining, . . .$2.75 

Heavy welefht, Bbeep pelt llnad 
Ulster, 10 ounce waterpreof duck 
on outside, brown shawl sheepskin 
collar. The bargain of the season. 
Warm as toast, $4.8S 

Black Doer Coat. Made of gen- 
uine New Zealand Black Dog skin. 
Quilted lining, leather arm shields. 
A large, warm, serviceable coat at 
the remarkably low price of $16.00 

For a complete line of Men's 
and Women's heavy Winter coats 
and furs write for our catalogu* 
—it's free. The finest lines to se- 
lect from in the country. Hon- 
estly made, reliable goods — no 
Imitations. When the quality of »♦« 
the goods is considered the prices J, 
are lower than those of any other A, 
firm. Don't buy until you have * 
seen our prices. * 



Well made in every way, easy 
running, removes all corn from 
the cob. It is so simple In its 
construction that it is impossible 
to get out of order. This machine 
deposits the corn in the box on , 
which it is mounted, and the cob *5J 
on the outside. Capacity, about T 
eig-ht bushels per hour. Weight, \ 
IS pounds. Order Number FIOO. X 
The most useful and economical A 
implement that a farmer can have, i. 



A Chiffonier 
Barg^ain 





The unusual beauty of this 
Chiffonier is at once apparent to 
even the most casual observer. 
^ The design is chaste, without be- 

♦ ing severe, and the whole effect is 
4* a marvel of elegance. 

3t Made of mahogany or golden 

•<* oak, dimensions of top, 20x24 

•> inches; mirror of beveled plate, 

♦> 10x14 inches. Has a swell top 

♦ drawer, two compartments under- 
*(♦ neath and three drawers below. 
Y Mounted on casters. 

3* The variety of bedroom furni- 

X ture we can supply is enormous 

X and comprises all the latest de- 

A signs. Our prices are lowest con- 

4t sistent with values. 



Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co., 

THE MAIL ORDER HOUSE 

341-43 Franklin Street. Chicago, III. 



THI 



iNGL-EINOOK. 




CANCER 

Cured wiihorit 
Surgery or 

Pain. 
Our latest 
book which 
iwe win send 
ifreeof ehargfl 
teilsftllaboui 
Cancer and 
all chronic 
and malig- 
nant 'liaeas- 
es , and how 
they can l>e 
cured at home quickly and at small ex- 
pense, reference, patients cured in every 
State and Territory, ministers & bankers 

Addresi, Drs. Einoliirt k Co., lock Boi CO, Kokomo, Ini 




p 



DOUBLE UMPKIN 
DOUBLE I 
DOUBLE UMPKIN 
UMPKIN PIE 



WHY NOT COME TO THE 

LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 

FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 

Where Pumpkins, Corn and common crops grow, as well as every kin( 
of California fruit? 

Come and visit the Brethren who are living here and see what they havi 
done in the past two years. 

Nearly 600 sales made since we put this land on the market and over 2,000 
people now living on the grant where there were but about sixty a little over 
five years ago. 

This does not look like a temporary boom, does it? Must be something 
solid behind all this. If not, five years ought to show up the weakness, but 
instead of weakening the Laguna and its various interests are growing stronger 
all the time. 

If you are thinking of coming to California to make a home you cannot 
afford to overlook this place. \, 

We still have plenty of good land with afcundant water for irrigation. 
The price is from $30.00 to $60.00 per acre, terms, one-fourth cash, balance 
in eight annual payments. 

COLONISTS' RATES 

will again be in force March 1 to 15, 1905. 

From Chicago to Laton, . . . . ; $33.00 

From Mississippi River to Laton, .v .$30.00 

From Missouri River to Laton, .-^25.00 

Make your plans to start for California March 1st and you will be in titee 
to buy land and put in a crop. \ 

Write us for free printed matter and local newspaper. Address 

NARES & SAUNDERS, = Laton, California. 

33tiS Mention the INGLENOOE whea WTitiag. 



h 



Sent on Approval 

TO RBSPONSIBLB FBOPLB 

Laughlin 

FOUNTAIN 
PEN 



Qnartateed Finest Qrade Mk. 

SOLID GOLD PEN 

To test the merits of this pub- 
,llcatlon as an advertising me- 
dium we offer you choice of 

These (I* 

Two fP 

Popular 

Styles 

For 

Only 




Poitpald 
to any 
•ddms 



(By legUtcred mail Sc extra) 



loldttr Is made of the finest 

uallty hard rubber. In four 

Imple parts, fitted with very 

ilgheit grade, large size Hk. 

gold pen, any flexibility d«- 

•Ired — Ink feeding device 

perfect. 

Either style— Richly QoM 
Mounted for presenUtlon 
purposes $1.00 extra. 

Qrand Spedal Offer 

You may try the pen a week 
If you do notfind Itas repre- 
I seated, fully as fine a value 
as you can secure for three 
times the price In any other 
makes. If not entirely satis- 
factory In every respect, re- 
turn It and -we villi sendyoa 
fl.lOforll, the extra lOc. Is 
foryoaf iroablt in writing as 
and to shorn our confidence in 
the Laughlin Pen— (Not one 
customer In 5000 has asked 
for their money back.) 

Lay this Publication 
down and write NOW 

Safety Pocket Pea Holder! 
sent free of charge with each [ 
Pen. 

ADDRESS 

Laughlin Mfg. Go. I 

*S' QrlswoldSt. Detroit. Mlcb. 



In Answering Advertisements please 
mention the Inglenook. 



if 

' i 

n 



Book Catalogue, Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, Illinois. 
NEW PICTORIAL EDITION OF 

The flolman Self=Pronoiincing Sunday School Teachers' Bible 

Containing New Copyrigiit Helps and EmbeUislied witiv Eighty Beautiful Pull-page Photo- 
Views of Bible Lands Distributed Tliroughout the Text. 

The Only Pictorial Teachers' Bible Published. 

The photographs from 
wliich these views were 
made were taken but re- 
cently, and they there- 
fore give correct repre- 
sentations of the present 
appearances of places 
made memorable by the 
sacred and historic asso- 
ciations of Bible times. 

In addition to the fore- • 
uoing series of superb 
jihoto-views, these Bibles 
also contain all the pop- 
ular Aids and Helps to 
the Study of the Bible de- 
scribed elsewhere. and 
Pifteen Beautiful Maps in 
Colors, with an Elaborate 
Cross-line Index, These 
Maps are entirely new 
and w"ere engraved ex- 
pressb' for the Holman 
Editions. 

cuit, leather lined, round corners, red 
under gold edges, $2,90J 

8835 Arabian Morocco, divinity circuit 

grained leather lining with fly leaves_t6 

match, silk head bands and marker, 

round corners, red under gold edges,. 

$3.50$ 

8838 Alaska Seal, divinity circuit, calf- 
skin lining to edge, silk sewed, silk head 
bands and marker, round corners, red 
under gold edges $4.50!i 

8876 Levant, divinity circuit, smooth 
purple calf lining to edge, silk sewed, 
silk head bands and marker, round cor- 
ners, red under gold edges .$5.90|| 




BOURGEOIS TYPE, 8vo. Size, Sy^x- 

73^x1^ inches. 

( For specimen of type see No. 8.) 

Printed on Pine White Paper. 

8810 Egyptian Morocco, divinity circuit, 
round corners, red under gold edges,. 
, . , $2.40J 

8816 French Seal, divinity circuit, linen 
lining round corners, red under gold 
edges, , $2.60J 

5830 Seal Grain Morocco, divinity cir- 



A German Teacher's Bible on a New and Improved Plan 

The Only Qerman Bible of the Kind Ever Published. "Scripture Explained by Means 
of Scripture through the Medium of Confirmatory Texts." 

It differs from other German Bibles in that it gives, in the most important instances, 
either Ihe full of the slightly abbreviated explanatory or elucidating texts in the narrow 
side columns on the outer edges of the page, as well as numerous references of the kind 
usually employed in Reference Bibles. In addition to the foregoing invaUiable features, 
this Bible contains: A Concordance; A History of the Bible; The Great Heathen Nations 
Mentioned in the Bible; A History of the New Archseological Discoveries in Bible I^ands; 
A History of the Jewish People; Weights, Measures, and Coins of the Bible; Geography and 
ToTtography of Palestine; A list of Scriptural Names and their Meanings; and Eight (S) 
Splendid Maps in Colors, in German text (just published). 



TEACHERS' BIBLES WITH THE 
APOCRYPHA. 

3512 Egyptian Morocco, divinity circuit,- 
red under gold edges $4.00** 

3530 French Seal, leather lined, divinity 
circuit, red tnider gold edges $4.50|| 



TEACHERS' BIBLES WITHOUT 
THE APOCRYPHA. 

3412 Egyptian Morocco, divinity circuit, 
red under gold edges $3.50J 

3430 French Seal, leather lined, divinity 
circuit, red under gold edges, $4.00|| 



&. Thumb Index on Any of the ATjove Styles Will Cost 35 Cents Extra. 

63 



The above is a Sample Page from our new Book and Bible Catalog. 
Drop us a postal, asking for this Catalog. IT'S FREE. 



/. 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin nois. 




inSl-eksok: 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 






<ts 



M 



PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



t^ 



POEM. 

THE PAST AND PRESENT. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

CRUISING ON THE MEDITERRANEAN.— Part IV.— By 

D. L. Miller. 
HOW BARREL STAVES ARE MADE.— By D. Z. Angle. 
DRUG STORES IN SWEDEN.— By A. W. Vaniman. 
INDIA SCHOOL EXAMINATION.— By. W. B. Stover. 
HINDOO MUSIC— By Marguerite Bixler. 
UNANCHORED.— By Hope Newcomer. 
LIFE. — By Chas. J. Conner. 

V 

EDITORIALS. 

IRRETRIEVABLE MISTAKES. 
PUTTING IN TIME. 
IN HIS OWN COIN. 



ELGIN. ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



January lO, 1905 



$ 1 .00 per Year 



Number 2, Volume VII 



the: rNGL-ENOOK. 



30,000 ACRES 

IRRIGATED 

Government Land 

In Nevada 



NOW OPEN FOR 



HOMESTEAD 



UNDER THE NEW 

IRRIGATION LAW 

The United States Oovern- 
ment Constructs the Canals, 
Reservoirs and Lateral Ditch- 
es to the Land, and Maintains 
them for lO Year* at a cost of 

ONLY $2.50 AN ACRE 

FEB TEAS. 

TW» Include* Water. After I* Years Water 
and Caaals Belong to Homesteader. 



Laad Close to Railroad and Good 
JVUrkets Can be Secured By 

ACTUAL SETTLERS 
ONLY. 



Mr. L. H. Taylor, the United States 
Engineer in charge of work, says: 
"It is likely that most of those set- 
tlers who desire, can find employment 
for themselves and teams on the ca- 
nals during at least a part of their 
spare time for the next two or three 
ye»rs." 



For Information Write to 

GEO. L. McDONAUGH, 

COLONIZATION AQENT 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Omaha, Neb. 



...THE,.. 

Union Pacific Railroad 

In Connection -With 

San Pedro, Les Angeles & Salt 
Lake Railroad 

EXPECT TO BE RUNNING 
THROUGH TRAINS BETWEEN 
CHICAGO AND LOS ANGELES 
VIA SALT LAKE CITY EARLY 
NEXT SPRING. 



There are opportunities in Southern 
Utah and Nevada where homes can 
be had at little expense, where no 
heavy clothing and but little fuel is 
needed, where garden, truck can be 
raised in abundance nearly the whole 
year, and where the people can live 
in tents throughout the year without 
suffering from heat or cold. The new 
line of the Salt Lake Route, now 
building through to California, will 
pass through several well watered 
valleys in these states, in which can 
be grown apples, grain, potatoes, figs, 
cotton, sugar cane, tobacco, peanuts 
and many of the semi-tropical fruits. 
These valleys are surrounded. by hills 
and lofty snow-capped mountains, 
which furnish an inspiring back- 
ground to the scene which greets 
the traveler who finds his way into 
the favored region. The climate is 
mild and delightful, and excessive 
heat and extreme cold is unknown. 
This is a good place for a poor man 
to get a home, the sick to find health 
and the capitalist to make good in- 
vestments. 

If you are interested in mining, 
manufacturing or agriculture, or seek- 
ing a new home in a new land, and 
desire to know more about the great 
resources of Utah, Nevada and Cali- 
fornia, write to Geo. L. McDonaugh, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Neb. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 



— Is Known As — 



"Tbe Overland Route" 



And is the only direct line_ from 
Chicago and the Missouri River to 
all principal points West. Business 
men and others can save many 
hours via this line. 

K L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



Join Excursion 

(To Sterling, Colorado,) 

South 
Platte 
Valley 

AND RETURN 

First and Tiiird Tuesday 
Each Month 

Where the Contract has been 
Let for a 

$750,000.00 BEET SUGAR 
FACTORY 



To be Erected on Land Adjoining City 
of Sterling, Bought from Mr. David 
■ Plum, of Maryland, Illinois. 



Only 24 hours' run to Chicago; only 
12 hours' run to the Missouri River; 
only 4 hours' run to Denver. The on- 
ly country that can make a good 
showing to the homeseeker in mid- 
winter. Go and see for yourself — it 
need only take four or five days' time 
and you will be well repaid by what 
you see. Buy your ticket over 

The Union Pacific 
Railroad 

Which is knovm as "The Over- 
land Route." and is the only direct 
line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West 
Business men and others can save 
many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal to your nearest ticket 
agent, or GEO. L. McDONAUGH, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Nebr. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebr. 



THE INQL-ENOOK. 



TheSterliiiR Democrat 






TO DEVELOP THE VALLEY 



The Penna Land, Water and Cattle Company 

Organized i^i Incorporated Under 

The Laws ot Colorado to 

DEVELOP AND STORE WATER 



iiultivato Land and Raise Cattle and 

Hogs In tlie Soutli Platto Volley 

Aluiij l.iiie ol' U. P. fi'.iit.- 



( t iiii.v di'v lops thutlbp rrcent visit 
lie Mr. J. li. Otto, president of the 
te((i):ty 0<imp.'iiiy yf Chioiiso, 111., hihI 
tjiliOHtsier, Tftiii^, .ull rrault in the 
*^fti5i2iition ot J ■•'. rnpaiiy of eastPro 
laen w-tnt rofiid'MU". <r. "'olonulOj who 
owu luii.i iit t'^,- - j,ul; i*Iatin v.'itU'., 
Thu cocipiiy «lll bo Uuown as tlio 
roniiii 1. mi, Wi.UT anil Cittle C'diii- 
f.Hii) , uud will 1)0 Inf:or;>or;itt*d uniU'V 
Uie laws of tiio slato of Oolor:iJu. It 
will tiHve f^*r Us object the plitoini^ ol 
llirit'} Ounkur fanners on land now 
o«ned by Mr. Otto and liis frluuds, !o 
the eud that tlio laud may be brouf^ht. 
lip lo Uiat tiiKh 8t;itft of oultivaLioii 
winch firevHTl.s in Ihp eastern stutew. 
TUe ooUliMuy aij^o inrenrt-s to install 
.pamping plants at varions points in 
th« ^>utii I'lattu vallf'-y along tbe routw 
ol tJie Ujiion Pa(;ifi'^ road lo di'.velop 
»fi addittonal wati-r .Tnpply. ivt'servoirs* 
«iU Uo coilBtructcd VI BOiiablo iilsvfs 
tp coris«Y-Ve ail fiorpluH water fron; tiie 
ilfempHny',: ditf.lKs. aa well as tli.;: de- 
vcl.';',-!! ijv ihc r.nmpiBi; pi luts, b.'iipr 
iIjK V- ' f.tTo iy nlon uiHU yiioii_;;h 
^ati^r llft>.-. nip to wa.'^to io ilie Sooih 
Platif river every winter iban is neo- 
easary to water all llio laud.s during 
tbe anuuner niontha. 

Tbe introduction of itie eastern 
furcaor wiil als-o brinc^ a iartje number 
of (triided u.'.llle and b.n;,ii into the ral- 
>«y to U> t lUeneJ on alfalfa hay and 
liefct pulp from thu Sieiliug auyar fac- 
tory. 

Tl-.e snlen'did showing tnado by Colo- 
rado at tUofft. Louis exposition, where 
iUT ;>i^rii_u)rui"*l products took the lead 
in ("rj; [Mvmiuaia and cold medals, and 
ibe .if,8'io;?^ted Pr^"^H disrat<'!iea tell 
iifJCOf the bni'riip/of tlje Sterling beet 
msRur ,^ul>>ry, bavo turned Uiv eyes of 
\Man:f eastern farann? towardti tiie 
^?-o.,; I j;i ii :y valley tcr lands. 

The ii,).'l Llrii. Mr. OLIO it< a uativeof 
l/vM<;asti'r comity, Penn.syivauia, prob- 
nlriy ae.-oanis for the adiiplion of "The 
J'eii;i,i L'i:i,i. Water and OiUtle I'oul- 
VMoy ■ as llie title ftu- tlie nev; e^frpoi.i- 
tion. ¥jie people of the South I'laite 
valley extend a hearty welcome to the 
nsv' company and wish il uU kinds of 
sucoes'a in iU undertakiijs 



* l-leraing News Note&f ' 

5v3rjift-i;rK,r..';T.n:?'si;S.;;!Wi»ii*i)at»i' 

W'tiare huvhiir some winter win'' 
pi-esent J 

Mr. CncBtor Preiioh's hi^alth I 
lns( and lie oKpools to (|0 to'Ue' 
(iliiiasi) for treatment. 

Mr. Day Amerman ami wife 
Ohrlstnia,!, al Hocbland. 

Mr. Cbarib) HradecVy has 
hnnio from Welllleel, Nebiaski' 
ho has been visiting his brothc 

The people of Fleming wel 
lalned Saturday eveniiiif, be' 
eve by a lar^je Xmns tree, Ih 
efforts ot Miss Detamoro ' 
scholars fhB'he,st that has 
iTeming for ten yours. 

Misses Kilna and Retta Blr<, 
llaxlum last Thursday pu 
(JhtislmaB nre.sents. 

Mr. Everett Ilavi* of Iliff is 
his father and o.vpeots to take 
load of corn, 

Mr, Norval Sm 
horn? in Fleming ) 
workin;; on the tr 
preeeut, 

Mr. Frank Hia( 
man in Ila.xlum s 

Mrs. \Vm. Xme 
and Mrs. L<J;;fo) 

The Morris oh 
Xmas vacation i>i, 

' ,Iohn H, Kiojl < 
night on a busin 
oummence his du 
urer of Lo,;.in c 
succeeding ffred, 
filled libit posititf, 
in a most katibfac 
Mr. King *'•' J>' 
taclory oflicial gl 




%VTro 



There >vill bo services at the IVeth- 
ren ohnroh at H A, M. and 7 i". .M. 
every >junday till furtkor notioB. Erery- 
Oody (Cordially iuvlted. 

J. H. UmtpoN, p.i»tor. 



Zaro woailiet seems ni '^My \' 
f ortablo and uncalled forty W 
radoaus, who had becoti." ai,<y 
to almost uiiiiiterrupted s,ut/ 
more tli.an twelve montns,' 
think of wh.at the poor 
Greoftlaad are puttiuff 
meanwhile. 

,Joa Weir came ht,me / 
and has been sieU siuoe/ 
Joe came up town last/ 
ranch to see his many/ 
heed along time slij 
They were all gla<l7 
hoped he would sp 
Sterling, / 



There \viU be 
ohurck by iW 
.Sunday at 111:.) 
foliuuid b,, i 
will also b 
iloiiday morn' 

Mr. and Mr^ 
here .U'edni'bdji' 
t«;y', Kansas, / 
frhuds. Ivoy/ 
interests tinxf 
Ilia, / 

AttoriKy 
yesttrdaj) 



I/I 

4) 

^ E 

•H 






request f J 
to look at 
ncot«d v 
floe. / 



.-'- it'i'ifcig-^.^ 



£ 

(i 
It. 



c 

(0 

c 

0) 

I- 





6 



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rri n 





Pi 
pi 
Pi 

P 

A 


H 



A PLAIN LETTER. 
Just a plain letter from a plain woman - not the kind 
tJiat sits in the lap of luxury and neither weaves nor spins, but 
one of those of God's creatures who is glad of the privilege 
and ability of working. Her letter breathes such a spirit of 
truth and sincerity and reveals to the eye in such an unobtru- 
sive way the noble character of "one who tolls" that it is well 

worth reading. 

Saddle River, N. J., Aug. 25. 
Dr. Peter Pahrney, 

Chicago, 111. , 
Dear Sir:- 

"I thank you for your kindness. I am, God be praised, 
again in good health. I owe it all to your wonderful medicine. 
I am recommending the Blood Vitalizer to all my friends, even in 
Holland. I cannot praise it enough. I am again able to do five 
or six washings and ironings a week. It seems almost marve- 
lous. My present health and strength is a surprise to those 
who knew me when I was sick. I hope you may live for many years 
yet to come and manufacture such good medicine for the people. 

Yours very gratefully, 

MRS. C. GROUT. 

Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer is a remedy for the 
mother, the housewife, the home, in fact, for everybody. It 
gives health, strength and happiness. It is supplied direct 
to the people. Write to Dr. Peter Fahrney, 112-114 S. Hoyne 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 



the: ingleinook. 




The Big Horn Basin 

is an opportunity 
of to=day 

The man who is wise will investigate it while land 
is cheap and opportunities for investment are numerous. 
He will begin by sending for our descriptive folder 
(twenty-four pages, illustrated), which is mailed free to 
any address, and which gives a reliable, comprehensive 
report of the conditions there, and the prospects of 
future advancement. 



A postal card request will bring a copy. 

FRANCIS, General Passenger Agent, 
209 Adams St., Chicago. 



W^N^ 






THE CRY OF THE TWO=THIRDS 

By MRS. S. R. GRAHAM-CLARK. 



A great story with a great purpose. It is a book 
for every family where there are boys and girls. 
It is as fascinating as it is powerful. It will be 
read and reread and shape character and conduct 
for life. 

It has been called the " Uncle Tom's Cabin " of 
the liquor traffic. If you want your boys and gfirls 
to shun the evils of the liquor traffic get this book 
for them to read. Do not wait until the horse is 
stolen before you lock the door. Order the book 
now. 

It contains 678 pages of clear type, laid paper, 
elegantly bound in handsome cloth, only $1.50. 

Address: 



^1^ 






BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, III. 









Weak Stomach 
Indigestion 
Dyspepsia 

To any sufferer of the above named 
diseases will be sent a 30 days Treat- 
ment of BRAWNTAWNS (SO cents) 
on the following conditions: Use ac- 
cording to directions, one tablet aft- 
er each meal and one before retiring 
for 30 days, and if you can truthfully 
say you have not received any benefit 
and do not feel any better from the 
use of BRAWNTAWNS , your mon- 
ey will be cheerfully refunded. 

Victor Remedies Company, 

FREDERICK, MD. 



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37113 Mention the INGLENOOK when writins. 

GOSPEL SONfiSand HYMNS 

No. I. 



Has a wonderful sale, and the book 
still LIVES. We are receiving or- 
ders daily for this book and have 
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has been published. There is onlv 
one reason for this. It is .=imply be- 
cause 

THE SONGS AND HYMNS IT 
CONTAINS STILL LIVK , 

This book is used by thousands in 
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meeting and general song service. It 
contains 208 pages and sells at_3(> 
cents eachj or,<, four for $1. Send 
your orders to 

BBETHSEN FUBI^ISHIHG aOUSE, 
Elgin, nilnols. 




I I 

I Irrigated Crops Never Fail | 



« 
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¥1^ A tJ/^ 'S the best-watered arid State in America. Brethren are moving there because hot ^ 

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We have great faith in what Idaho has to oflFer to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a ^ 

change for the general improvement in your condition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on ^! 

account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise ^ 

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swer and many conditions to investigate. ^. 

^. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad ^; 

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Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see ^ 

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100,000 Acres Now Open for Settlement at 
Twin Palls, Idaho, under the Carey Act. 



Unlimited supply of water for irrigation and for power. A grand opportunity for the Home- 5i 
seeker who locates on these lands. 10 years time given for payment for land and water after lands ^^ 

3ng to the settlers who will own and control the same. S^ 



;^ are sold. Thr canals and water belong 

9 



Alfalfa, Fruits, and Veg:etables, Grow in Abundance. Fine 



^ 



Grazing: Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 



9 Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 

'^ Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 

•d to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 

:S or March the yield would have been much larger. 

■^ Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 

:jK oats. 

•^ Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 

:^ the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 

s i 

^ D. £. BURLEY, ^. 

- S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 5 

J. E. HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. Salt Lake City, Utah. ^ 

MntioB the nrOLENOOE -when writiB,. 40tl3 ^^ 

si 



^ 




Vol. VII. 



January 10, 1905. 



No. 2. 



THE NEW YEAR MINE. 



Oh, every year's a hidden mine; 

Stoutly up and work it : 
What, though anxious toil is thine? 

Never think to shirk it. 

Half the mine, as I am told, 

Harbors dust and ashes; 
Half the mine is precious gold — 

Ah, how bright it flashes! 

Sink the shaft of Lazy Mind, 

(What a dreadful bore, sir:) 
Dust and ashes you will find. 

That, and nothing more, sir! 

Sink the shaft of Earnest Heart — 

So the treasure glances. 
Gleaming gay in every part 

Where your pick advances. 

See, my lad, the New Year mine. 

Bright with promise flashes! 
Will you dig for treasure fine. 

Or only dust and ashes? 

—AMOS R. WELLS. 

Auburndale, Mass. 

* ♦ ♦ 

SNAPSHOTS. 



Tact and trickery plan; the people pay. 

It is easy to go to seed on a good reputation. 
* 

A horse that is led, is not necessarily an animal of 
mettle. 

* 

All the world wants to be good enough to escape 
trouble. 



Character is prosperity; it is the noblest of pos- 
sessions. 

* 
Destroy liquor by drinking it, and it retaliates by 
destroying you. 

* 

A church that really wants people to attend its serv- 
ices will be pretty sure to get them.. 



We are nener so zveak as ivhen we think zve are 
very strong. 

Every time you do anything for God you take a 
step towards heaven. 

Intolerance is the characteristic of the hot-blooded. 
Keep cool and you will keep tolerant. 

When you have hard zvork to do, sing while you are 
doing it, and angels will join in the chorus. 

* 
Instead of " putting off the old man," some people 
try to dress him up and make him look nice. 

* 

A cheerful disposition will do more for you than 
a pedigree running back to the Mayflower. 

*' 
The bad man throws mud at the good man because 
he has to do it to keep from looking at himself. 

The world needs people who have the courage to 
do right, a great deal more than it does soldiers. 

Misfortunes never come singly. They are married 
and are attended by a large brood of minor troubles. 

The debt of nature, death, is paid on the installment 
plan, commencing where the facidties begin to decay. 

One of the ivorst signs of the times is to sign a 
note for another fellow that you eventually have to 
pay. 

* 

Lasy, dragging, lifeless, singing is what the devil 
would have every time, if he could have his way in 
a meeting. 

♦ 

$000.01 represents a human life without an educa- 
tion. Reverse it by a good practical education and it 
becomes $10,000. 



26 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



CRUISING ON THE MEDITERRANEAN.— Chap. 4. 



BY D. L. MILLER. 



After passing the plain of Troy on our way to 
Smyrna, described in my last letter, we cruised for two 
full days among the beautiful islands of the Mgea.n 
sea, following and crossing again and again the line 
of Paul's voyage after his return from Macedonia to 
Troas accompanied by Gains, Timothy, Aristarchus, 
Sopater, Secundus, and other brethren who had de- 
termined to accompany the apostle on his journey into 
Asia. It is a matter of record that they remained 
five days at Troas, where Paul preached his long ser- 
mon, continuing even until after midnight, and then, 
after breaking bread "early in the morning of the sec- 
ond day of the week, they separated, Paul to walk to 
Assos, for he was minded to go afoot, whither his 
traveling companions preceded him by ship, and where 
they " took him in and came to Mitylene. And we 
sailed thence, and came the next day over against 
Chios; and the next day we arrived at Samos, and 
tarried at Trogyllium; and the next day we came to 
Miletus." After the most interesting meeting with 
the elders of Ephesus, at the last named city, and 
Paul's most tender and touching charge to them, with 
the last prayer at the seaside, and the last tearful fare- 
well, for they were to see his face no more in the flesh, 
the record says : 

" And it came to pass, that after we had gotten from 




VATHY AND HARBOR, ISLE OF SAMOS. 

them, and launched, we came with a straight course 
to Coos, and the following day unto Rhodes, and from 
thence unto Patara : And finding a ship sailing over 
unto Phoenicia, we went aboard and set forth. Now 
when we had discovered Cyprus, we left it to the left 
hand, and sailed unto Syria, and landed at Tyre." 

The details given of this voyage are so explicit 
that it is the easiest possible matter to follow it after 
a lapse of over eighteen hundred years. 

We had two perfect autumn days, Saturday and 
Sunday, October 22 and 23, for this most interesting 
cruise. The sky was clear and the sea as smooth as 



a mill pond; the sun shone brightly all the day and 
the full moon made the nights ravishingly beautiful. 
We were not out of sight of land until we " discovered 
Cyprus and left it on the left hand and sailed unto 
Syria." To the west we watched the sun sink away 
into the sea and then turning to the east saw the full- 
orbed moon coming up from the waters. Those who 
had the privilege of witnessing the sight will never 
forget it. We sat on deck of the ship into the late 
hours of the night and almost begrudged the time 




QUAY AT VATHY, SAMOS. 

spent in sleep, that took us away from the beauties 
of the scene. Our course took us by Troas and As- 
sos, and then sailing over against Chios the next day 
we came to Samos where we cast anchor and had the 
privilege of going ashore. I have passed over this 
route several times before and have always been im- 
pressed with the accuracy of the description of Paul's 
voyage, but after reading it have always found myself 
wishing there was more of it. 

Vathy, the capital of Samos, is a beautiful little 
city, with a population of six thousand, pleasantly 
situated on the slopes of the hill bordering the sea. 
The " Orenoque " cast anchor a quarter of a mile 
from the quay and we were taken ashore in small boats 
manned by Greeks. The city contains the Governor's 
house, or palace as it is called, Government buildings 
and the house of parliament only recently completed 
at the cost of the modest sum of fifty thousand dollars. 
The streets of the city are kept scrupulously clean, the 
houses are well built and newly painted, and altogether 
it is in striking contrast with the filth and foul smells 
of the Turkish capital. It is not a Turkish town. The 
little Greek church which we entered, for it was the 
Lord's Day and the house of prayer was open for wor- 
shipers, is a model of cleanliness and comfort. 

Aside from the fact that Paul was once at this place 
the little island of Samos has a very interesting his- 
tory. Every lover of liberty and true progress will 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



27 



rejoice to know that in part at least it is free and inde- 
pendent of Turkish rule. Ever since the year of 1826, 
when Greek liberty was assured, Sanios has been semi- 
independent. For this privilege they arc compelled 
to pay the Sultan an annual sum of ten thousand dol- 
IfRrs, and that ruler has the right to appoint the gov- 
ernor, who, however, according to the treaty, must be 
of the orthodox Greek faith. The island has a popu- 
lation of some fifty-four thousand Greeks and seventy 
Turks. All of the latter are officials looking after 
the Sultan's interest. The present governor is a Greek 
by birth, a member of the orthodox church, is well 
educated, speaks English fluently and is regarded as 
a good man and a judicious ruler. He has a liberal 
education and spent some years at the capital of the 
United States. 

The climate of Samos leaves nothing to be desired, 
if the voice of the natives is to be taken in evidence, 
for they tell you with all gravity that their island has 
the most salubrious climate in the world and that it is 
never too cold or too hot. The vine is cultivated ex- 




it 



**^*^^''****W»A«.«.'HSj««AAa»5*J^'^ 




GOVERNOR S HOUSE, VATHY, SAMOS. 

tensively and the wine, which is one of the chief 
products, is of such fine quality and excellent flavor 
that it is never sold to the general market. It finds its 
way to tables of the royalty of Europe and to the most 
fashionable clubs and hotels in London and Paris. 
This makes the cultivation of the vine very profitable 
to the people of Samos. On a former visit to Samos, 
in 1898, our ship took on board a hundred or more 
large casks of wine for transportation to Europe. Of 



course the grape raising area of the island is small 
and the production of wine limited. 

Tobacco of a very fine quality is also grown to some 
extent, and cereals, the semi-tropical fruits, with figs 
and olives are also produced. The soil is fertile and 
the people of the island appear to be prosperous and 
happy. They have neither army nor navy to support. 
The island is policed by the natives, but these have 




VATHY POLICEMAN WITH FLAG. 

little to do, as the inhabitants have the reputation of 
being well behaved and of peaceful disposition. 

For some time after sailing away from Samos we 
had the beautiful little island and its interesting capital 
astern, and after losing sight of it we had other places 
of equal interest in full view. To the left we passed 
the coast line of Asia Minor, and with our glasses 
could easily distinguish the site of Miletus, where Paul 
called the elders to him, and farther inland the ruined 
city of Ephesus, the site of one of the seven churches 
of Asia. But perhaps more interesting than all these 
is yonder rocky islet known so long as Patmos, whither 
the beloved apostle, St. John, was banished by the 
Roman emperor Domitian, A. D. 94, and where he had 
the wonderful apocalyptic vision and wrote the book 
of Revelation. 

" I, John, who am also your brother and companion 
in tribulation, and in the kingdom and patience of Je- 
sus Christ, was in the isle which is called Patmos, for 
the word of God, and for the testimony of Jesus Christ. 



28 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



" It was in the Spirit on the Lord's day, and heard 
behind me a great voice, as of a trumpet, saying, I am 
Alpha and Omega, the first and the last: and. What 
thou seest write in a book, and send it unto the seven 
churches which are in Asia; unto Ephesus, and unto 
Smyrna, and unto Pergamos, and unto Thyatira, and 
unto Sardis, and unto Philadelphia and unto Laodicea." 

Patmos is but twenty-eight miles in circumference, 
and has a population of some four thousand, most of 
them Greeks, but they are under Turkish rule. There 
is but little fertile land on the island, and what is there 
is planted in vineyards and pasturage for sheep. 
Sheep herding and vineyarding are the chief occupa- 
tion of the inhabitants. 

A cave over which a Greek church has been built 
is pointed out as the place where St. John is said to 
have had his home and where he wrote the message 
declared unto him by the Lord. Thousands of pious 
pilgrims, mostly Russians, visit the island annually 
for the purpose of meditation and prayer, and no little 




POLICEMEN AT SAMOS. 

revenue comes to the dwellers from this source. The 
island is well worth a visit because of the sacred as- 
sociations connected with it. It is situated some twen- 
ty miles from Samos and about thirty from the coast 
of Asia Minor. 

Very early in the morning of the next day we dis- 
covered the island of Cyprus to our left, and passing 
on that side of it we continued in a straight course 
to Beirut in Syria. Here we found a ship, " The 
Portugal," ready to depart for Jaffa, and we went 
aboard and set sail for the city by the sea. At Beirut 
our five traveling companions left us to make an over- 
land journey from that place to Jerusalem. 

In the evening we loosed from Beirut and in the 
early morning of the next day cast anchor in the open 
sea a half mile from Jaffa. The sea was smooth and 
we made our sixth landing at the city of Peter, Dorcas 
and Simon the tanner with the greatest possible com- 
fort. It was very unlike some of our previous land- 
ings when the sea was rough and we had some very 
trying experiences. Here at Jaffa our cruise of the 
Mediterranean ended. It continued for the space of 
two weeks and our ship's log showed that from Mar- 



seilles we had made in round numbers twenty-eight 
hundred miles. The voyage was a most pleasant one 
and at its conclusion we had occasion to thank the 
Giver of all good for his watch care over us. 

♦ 4* ♦ 

THE TRUE STORY OF MARY AND HER * 
LITTLE LAMB. 



Once upon a time, long ago, before most of our 
grandmothers were alive — in fact, when the last cen- 
tury was only six years old — there was born, in a quaint 
little one-story house that stood among the trees of 
a quiet farm in America, a little girl, who was named 
Mary. 

This little Mary Sawyer grew into a bright and 
cheerful child, with a great love for dumb animals. 
From the very time she could toddle after her father 
through the barnyard, every four-footed thing on the 
farm was her friend. Animals always love those who 
love them, and little Mary was quite as safe in the 
stall of a spirited horse, playing with a baby colt, as 
she would have been sitting within doors nursing a 
rag doll. 

One raw March morning, when Mary was seven or 
eight years old, she went out to the barn to see her 
father feed the cows, as she usually did, no matter 
how cold it was, nor how early. In the sheep pen 
they found two wee baby lambs. The mother had 
cared for one of them, but had pushed the smaller and 
weaker one aside. The poor creature was almost dy- 
ing, and as Mary looked at it her eyes filled with tears. 

" father ! " she said, " please let me have it for 
mine own, and take it into the kitchen. I will treat it 
better than its mother does." 

At first he said no, but he could not help giving way 
to his tender-hearted little daughter's pleading, and at 
last said she could take the lamb if her mother was 
willing. 

Mary ran to the house, where she did not find it 
very difficult to get her mother's consent. 

She wrapped the lamb in a warm shawl and held 
it snugly in her arms near the fire, and tried to tempt 
it with some milk. It did not seem to grow any 
stronger, and the young nurse was almost in despair. 

Both her father and her mother told her that her 
efforts were of no use, the lamb would certainly die; 
but Mary had made up her mind not to leave her little 
charge as long as it breathed. When night came she 
begged leave to sit up with the lamb in her arms. 
Just before morning it was able to drink a little milk 
that the child had warmed. Worn with her night of 
nursing, Mary went to sleep, and when in the early 
morning her mother came into the kitchen, she found 
the two little ones cuddled together fast asleep. 

From that time the lamb grew steadily stronger. 
Mary kept it in the house until it was able to run about, 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



29 



and by and by when it was sent to the farmyard it 
always followed her whenever she came out of the 
house. The little girl took great pride in her pet's 
appearance. She used to tie up its wool with gay rib- 
bons, and sometimes she and her brother Tom would 
dress it up in a shawl, and then they thought it was 
the " funniest looking thing that ever was." 

One morning, just as Mary and her brother were 
starting for school, Mary remembered that she had 
not said good-morning to her lamb. She called to it 
as she walked down the garden path, and, bleating a 
joyous answer, it came running to her side. 

" I tell you what we'll do," said Tom, who had per- 
haps more than his share of love for boyish mischief. 
" Let's take it to school." 

" Very well," said Mary, who saw no real good 
reason for leaving her little woolly friend behind. The 
lamb trotted happily along by her side, and they 
reached the schoolhouse early, before the teacher came, 
though some of the pupils were standing at the door. 
At first Mary did not know what to do with her pet. 
But then the idea came to Mary that the lamb could 
hide under her seat. The little thing had such trust 
in its young mistress that it stayed where she placed 
it, under the seat, covered with her shawl, and was 
soon fast asleep. It was so quiet, indeed, that Mary, 
busy with her book, forgot it until she left the place 
to say her lesson to the teacher. Then a clatter of 
little hoofs on the bare floor quickly reminded her that 
the Iamb was with her, and, as usual, was following 
her every step. 

Of course the other children all laughed and giggled, 
and poor little Mary, blushing and much ashamed, 
was sternly reproved by her teacher. 

" Take that animal out of the school at once, Mary 
Sawyer," she said. " I am surprised that you should 
bring it here. Never do such a thing again." 

It happened that a lad of seventeen, who was pre- 
paring for college, had stopped at the school to rest 
during a long walk, and he was much amused by the 
affair of the lamb, which happened during his visit to 
the school. 

The next day he went over to the farm where Mary 
lived, and handed the little girl, who was playing with 
her pet, a piece of paper, on which were penciled these 
lines : — 

" Mary had a little lamb, 

His fleece was white as snow; 
And everywhere that Mary went, 
The Iamb was sure to go. 

" He followed her to school one day — 
That was against the rule; 
It made the children laugh and play 
To see the lamb at school. 

"The teacher therefore turned him out; 
>But still he lingered near, 
And waited patiently about 
Till Mary did appear." 



Thus it was that the verses that have been said and 

resaid to baby ears over and over again for half a 

century came to be written by a bright, fun-loving 

boy, who never wrote anything else that any one knows 

of. Although the verses became quite popular in the 

neighborhood, and were printed in a newspaper soon 

after they were written, they did not become very 

widely known until after they appeared in a volume, 

called Poems for Our Children, published in 1829. It 

is believed that Mrs. Sarah Joseph Hale, who got up 

the volume, added the last two verses, which run : — 

" Then he ran up to her, and laid 
His head upon her arm, 
As if he said, ' I'm not afraid; 
You'll keep me from all harm.' 

"'What makes the Iamb love Mary so?' 
The eager children cry. 
' Oh, Mary loves the lamb, you know,' 
The teacher did reply." 

Little Mary, the heroine, did not like all this, and 
often wished that the verses might have remained 
private. But when one considers how much pleasure 
and amusement many little people have got from the 
oft-repeated words, it seems that it was best after all 
that they should become known, particularly as Mary 
grew into a very good and useful woman, and is grate- 
fully remembered by those who knew her for her 
sweet character and noble work as matron of a hos- 
pital. 

We are sorry to say that the lamb came to an un- 
timely death. Mary was out in the barn one day 
watching the cows, and the lamb was at her heels. As 
Mary and her pet passed by a cow it turned furiously 
and gored the lamb. It was a fatal injury. In speak- 
ing of it, long years afterwards, when she was an old 
lady, Mary said, — 

" I shall never forget the agony and appeal in the 
lamb's eyes as they turned to mine. I gathered the 
little creature in my arms and held it until it died. I 
have had many troubles in my life, but never have I 
experienced keener grief than when my dear little 
lamb died in my arms." 

Mary would not wear the stockings which her 
mother knitted from the soft, warm fleece of the lamb, 
but carefully preserved them as a precious remem- 
brance of her pet. — The Little Chronicle. 
♦ ♦ * 
PRODUCTION OF GOLD. 



The total production of gold from the mines 
of the world for 410 years, or since there has been any 
record of the same kept, is officially given at $10,693,- 
236,302. The total production of gold from the mines 
ot the United States since its discovery is given at 
$2,539,503,140. Of this the Eastern and Southern 
States produced $32,492,648, leaving $2,507,010,492 as 
the amount of gold produced by the mountainous 
country west of the meridian of Denver. 



30 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905, 



HOW BARREL STAVES ARE MADE. 



BY D. Z. ANGLE. 



Several times during the past summer we visited 
a stave factory in operation at Wayne City, 111. This 
building occupies about two acres of ground, includ- 
ing the machinery, timber to cut, and space for rick- 
ing up the staves. The main building, where the sixty 
horse-power engine is located, is about forty feet wide 
by sixty feet long. Under this roof is the rip saw, 
the equalizer, the stave cutter, an emery wheel, a 
grindstone, three and one-half feet wide by six inches 
thick, which is run by belt the same as the other ma- 
chinery, and is kept going constantly. 

At the south end of the building are eight air-tight 
steam boxes, which hold about twenty-five cords 
of wood. The wood is hauled on the ground, cut in 
blocks three feet long; also logs of different sizes and 
lengths, and variety of species but mostly hickory, 
gum, sycamore, oak, and elm. Some of the sycamore 
logs are of immense size ; we found one four feet and 
four inches across the big end. 

There is a separate engine and saw for cutting up 
the long logs. For the three-foot wood they pay two 
dollars per cord. These blocks are cut first by the 
rip saw into smaller sections, which are placed in the 
steam boxes and left there over night. This steam- 
ing takes the sap out of the wood. The steam is ob- 
tained from the engine, a night man being required 
to attend to this work. In the morning these blocks 
are ready to cut ; the men carry them to the equalizer, 
which is nothing more than two circular saws, one 
on each end of a three-foot crank and running at 
high speed. After going between these saws every 
block is cut off the same or equal length. From here 
the blocks are handed to the stave cutter, who feeds 
them to a long knife some three feet in length. This 
knife swings back and forth, something like the pendu- 
lum of a clock, and cuts a stave each time it swings 
forward. And it doesn't swing very slow either to 
cut twenty-five cords of wood a day. The bolts 
probably average fifty staves each, but we heard of 
one making one hundred and eight staves. This is 
a dangerous place, as the man who does the feeding, 
with a little carelessness, might quickly lose a finger 
or two. A man on the opposite side of the cutter re- 
ceives the staves as they are cut and lays them on a 
frame from where they are taken and put on a two- 
wheeled cart; then they are hauled away and stacked 
up and covered with sheds for protection from the 
weather. 

After drying some time, the staves are taken down 
by boys and carried to the jointer. This machine is 
operated by one man alone. He cuts the staves very 
rapidly, in the shape we see them when made in 



barrels, that is, wide in the middle and narrower at 
the ends. The operator does this at two strokes, cut- 
ting first one side of the staves, then the other side. At 
the same time he grades them by throwing them in 
several different piles. This grading requires much 
care and attention, as some of the inferior staves might 
be placed with the better grade. 

But it is indeed remarkable how fast the men can 
work and apparently make no mistakes. One person 
takes the staves and places them, one by one, on a 
frame, fifty in a bunch, tying it up neatly, and then 
ricks these bunches up ready for shipment to some 
barrel factory. This isn't very desirable employment, 
especially around the engine, the saws and the stave 
cutter. Recently the belt wheel, which runs the rip 
saw, broke and two pieces flew off; one broke through 
the oak board siding and landed out in the yards. 
No one happened to be in the way to get hurt. An- 
other time a man would have fallen on the rip saw 
if it had not been for a fellow workman, who caught 
and thus saved him from an awful death. 

However, none of the twenty men have been serious- 
ly hurt during the six months the plant has been run- 
ning at this place. It will probably stay here for sev- 
eral years, or until all the available timber has been 
cut into barrel staves. 

Later on if the Editor permits, we may give the 
Nook readers a short article, describing the butcher 
block factory, located in the same town. 

Mt. Vernon, III, R. F. D. No. ■/. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
MAN'S PHYSICAL MACHINERY. 



The average weight of an adult man is 140 pounds, 
six ounces. 

The average weight of a skeleton is about four- 
teen pounds. 

Number of bones, 240. 

The skeleton measures one inch less than the height 
of the living man. 

The average weight of the brain of a man is three 
and a half pounds; of a woman, two pounds, one 
ounce. 

The brain of a man exceeds twice that of any other 
animal. 

The average height of an Englishman is five feet 
nine inches ; of a Frenchman, five feet four inches, and 
of a Belgian, five feet, six and a half inches. 

The average weight of an Englishman is 150 
pounds ; of a Frenchman, 136 pounds, and of a Belgian, 
140 pounds. 

A man breathes about twenty times a minute or 
1,200 times in an hour. 

A man breathes about ten pints of air in a minute, 
or upward of seven hogsheads in a day. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



31 



A man annually contributes to vegetation 124 pounds 
of carbon. 

The average of the pulse in infancy is 120 per min- 
ute ; in manhood, eighty ; at sixty years, sixty. The 
pulse of females is more frequent than that of males. 

The weight of the circulation blood is about twenty- 
eight pounds. 

The heart beats seventy-five times in a minute ; sends 
nearly ten pounds of blood through the veins and ar- 
teries each beat: makes four beats while we breathe 
once. 

Five hundred and forty pounds, or twenty-four 
hogsheads and four gallons, or 10,782^/2 pints, pass 
through the heart in twenty-four hours. 

One thousand ounces of blood pass through the 
kidneys in one hour. 

One hundred and seventy million holes or cells are 
in the lungs, which cover a surface thirty times greater 

than the human body. 

^ ^ ^ * 

HABITS OF LIZARDS. 



FOOD ADULTERATION IN EUROPE. 



The Little Reptiles Are Good-Natured and Fond of 
Frolicking. 

While the abandonment of their eggs in an ap- 
parently heartless manner leads to the supposition that 
they are indifferent to the welfare of their offspring, 
which is true, it is somewhat interesting to notice how 
very tolerant they are of the petty annoyances to which 
their own or another's young subject them. My ob- 
servations on this point were made from a number of 
young, and old, confined in a roomy Wardian case, 
but probably what I saw there holds good among the 
lizards in their native haunts. I am sure it did among 
the many living on the old trestle at May's landing. 
Often a little lizard, and sometimes two, would perch 
upon the head and back of an adult, and be allowed 
to sit there fully an hour. The sharp claws of these 
youngsters seemed at times dangerously near the eyes 
and ears of the patient old one, but it offered no resist- 
ance, and, when I forced such burdened lizards to 
move, it was always with a deliberateness that suggest- 
ed that they were really averse to disturbing those 
resting upon them. 

Again, adults would often rest upon each other 
in what appeared to be a most uncomfortable manner 
for the one beneath, often pressing the head of the 
latter into the sand, and completely blinding it for the 
time; yet I never saw the slightest evidence of ill-hu- 
mor, not even when being fed. Often it happened 
that some sleepy fellow would quietly snap up the fly 
toward which another lizard was cautiously crawling, 
yet no fight ensued. Anything more trying than this 
to humanity can not be imagined, yet the lizards took 
every occurrence as a matter of course. — Christian at 
Work. 



Consul-General Gui:nther, Frankfort, reports: 
An article on the adulteration of food products is going 
the rounds of the German press. It is stated, for in- 
stance, that the ordinary liver patty is made into fine 
" Strassburger " pate de foie gras (a goose-liver patty) 
by means of borax and salicylic acid and finely chopped 
and cleverly distributed pieces of black silk, repre- 
senting trufifes. 

Cosmos, a German paper, guarantees the fact that 
under the label of canned lobsters the soft parts of 
the cuttlefish and crabs are sold. 

In Paris snails are, of late, very popular, and the 
adulterators mix them with lungs of cattle and horses. 
Even entirely artificial snails are manufactured. The 
shells, recoated with fat and slime, are filled with lungs 
and then sold as " Burgundy " snails. 

Lovers of fresh rooster combs are imposed upon 
by a substitute cut out of hogs' intestines. 

Chopped artificial truffles are made of black rubber, 
silk, or softened leather, and even whole truffles are 
made out of roasted potatoes, which are given a pe- 
culiar flavor by adding ether. 

Fish spoiled in spite of ice and borax is treated 
with salts of zinc, aluminum and -other metals. Rub- 
bing the fish with vaseline to give it a fresh look and 
coloring the gills with fresh blood or eosin — a coal-tar 
color — is resorted to. The latter is also used to in- 
tensify the red color of inferior crabs. 

Imparting a greenish color to oysters is another 
adulteration. An oyster requires about one month 
in the beds to acquire the greenish color. As this is 
too long a time, the dealers help them along with ar- 
tificial color. 

The chemists in the Paris municipal laboratories 
have shown that tomato jelly is adulterated with tur- 
nips, and powdered pepper contains a large admixture 
of powdered hard-tack. 

♦ ♦ * 

WHY FROGS ARE COLD. 



Many boys have probably wondered why frogs are 
cold to the touch, and some of them look upon these 
little creatures with a sort of horror, believing that 
they have no blood. But such is not the case, for they 
have not only blood, but they possess nerves and can 
feel. Perhaps if this were more generally known there 
would not be so many heartless boys who seem to take 
special delight in torturing frogs and toads. Accord- 
ing to scientists, frogs are cold blooded because they 
consume very little air. It is the same with fishes. 
Without a plentiful supply of air there is not much 
animal heat, because combustion is slow. 



32 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



DRUG STORES IN SWEDEN. 



BY A. W. VANIMAN. 

In America, almost every little village has a drug 
store, and the time w^as when almost any one could 
set up a drug store without any restrictions. But now 
in the most of the states, a person must pass a required 
examination before he is allowed to take charge of a 
drug store where prescriptions are filled. The drug 
store is a private enterprise, and the owner of a drug 
store can sell it at any time to any one he may see fit. 
But such is not the case in Sweden. No man can sell 
a drug store to any one he may choose. The drug 
business is under the control of a committee who de- 
termine where drug stores may be located and who shall 
have the right to control them. This strictly speaking 
refers to apothecary shops, or in other words, places 
where physician's prescriptions are filled, and where 
poisons are sold. 

When a man dies or wishes to leave the business 
of keeping such a store, this committee determines 
who shall have the right to the place. This ig de- 
termined by the length of time a man has been in the 
business of filling prescriptions anywhere in Sweden. 
They take turn like in the railroad business. The per- 
son taking charge of the place is under no obligation 
to purchase the stock of the former proprietor but 
may set up in another building, in the same vicinity. 
He may buy the old stock and continue at the same 
place if he sees fit, but is under no obligations to do 
so. 

There are very few drug stores in Sweden in com- 
parison with America. In Malmo a town of nearly 
seventy thousand inhabitants there are four drug 
stores besides several stores where the heavier classes 
of drugs are sold, but no poisons. There is talk of 
locating two more in the city, and when it is done the 
committee will determine the vicinity where they are 
to be located. No one can purchase any poison at 
a drug store without a prescription from a Swedish 
physician. Sometime ago the writer desired to have 
a prescription for a liniment filled and because it had 
about a teaspoonful of chloroform in it they refused 
to fill it in that form, and although they well know 
that he is a practicing physician in America it was 
just the same. The law is extremely strict on a drug- 
gist who sells poisons without a Swedish doctor's pre- 
scription. One can think that such experience is a 
little humiliating for an American. But such is the 
way of the world, one must adapt himself to his sur- 
roundings. A physician of our acquaintance has' very 
kindly offered to put his name to any prescription we 
might want to have 'filled. 

As compared with America, physicians are few. 
There are thirty-nine physicians in Malmo, while in a 



city of its size in America one would expect to find 
at least two hundred. So far as my observation goes 
they never prescribe their own medicines even at the 
bedside, but write a prescription. And the druggists 
have a great deal to do. One drug store here, where 
we are well acquainted, often fills three hundred pre- 
scriptions per day. When a prescription is filled it 
is handed back and one finds it also written on the 
label. So when one picks up a bottle of medicine he 
can see what the medicine is, provided he is ac- 
quainted with the Latin name of the medicine. Pat- 
ent medicines are used somewhat but nothing to the 
extent that they are in America. It is probably that 
much better for the people. Many persons take medi- 
cine more from habit than from absolute necessity. 

A large proportion of people can wait patiently 
for nature to cure a disease if they are taking some 
medicine, where it would be very difficult to do this 
if they did not feel that they were at least doing some- 
tliing to help the case along. But it is encouraging 
to see that physicians are prescribing less medicine 
and teaching people more hygiene and right living. 

Malmo, Sweden. 

* ♦ * 

THE COUNTRY HOME AND ITS 

ENVIRONMENT. 



In every home, whether in city or country, three 
things are absolutely essential to health ; viz : pure air, 
pure water, and pure food. We have seen in previous 
articles how both the food and water are often con- 
taminated; also how the atmosphere is rendered im- 
pure. Let us now consider some of the causes that are 
at work, at least in country homes, to create local mi- 
asms and beget disease. For example, the farmer who 
is about to build a house, may decide to locate it near 
a stream of water; though this may be stagnant a 
good part of the year, with green scum floating on 
its surface. 

In a large per cent of all our states, the wind blows 
from the south or southwest during most of the sum- 
mer months, and sometimes in the winter; so that if 
the farmer builds his home on the north or east side 
of a sluggish stream, the breezes will blow over the 
stagnant water, and carry the germs of malaria directly 
into the house and yard. It would be better therefore 
to put the residence on another side of the stream, 
and if possible a little distance away from it. Or if 
there is a stagnant pond near by, would it not be well 
to avoid any contagion that might be generated by it? 
The location of a bam or stable is also an important 
matter in a country home ; for unless it is kept exceed- 
ingly clean, the exhalations given off from the stable 
and elsewhere, might be blown right into the house. 

Then there are pig pens, cow lots and poultry yards 
to be located. There is a best place for these, and 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January lo, iqqs. 



33 



to insure the health and comfort of the family it should 
be found. Most important of all, however, is the 
source of the water supply. If a well is to be dug, and 
the water used for drinking and cooking purposes, the 
fanner should try to locate it in such a way that im- 
purities from the barnyards, stables, vaults or privies 
(not to mention cow lots, pig pens and the like), can- 
not find access to it. I have seen more than one case 
of typhoid fever in farm places and in towns and vil- 
lages, where the well stood very near the privy and 
also to the barnyard. 

Even in our cities, especially in the wild and woolly 
west, the most obvious rules of health and sanitation 
are apt to be disregarded. I have known families 
who made considerable pretense, in their persons 
at least, to neatness and style, who not only kept chick- 
ens in their back and front yards (with every spear 
of grass eaten off), but in winter these fowls were 
housed in the cellar. When we consider that the at- 
mosphere in basement apartments can easily be carried 
all through the house, this of itself ought to be an 
objection to keeping poultry in them. 

I once lived next door to a lady (worth a good 
many thousand dollars), who had a compost heap 
not merely in her back yard, but at the kitchen door; 
chickens' heads and feet, and other things still more 
objectionable went into the pile. In the large front 
window facing the street there were pies, cakes and 
candies, with other tempting confections, which she 
sold to the best class of people. These individuals 
could not of course look over a high fence into the 
back yard. Not every dweller in cities, nor even in 
country places, observes the same neatness and order 
in the back yard that is generally displayed in the 
front. And yet, I know people who think more of 
their back yards and take better care of them than 
they do of the little patch at the front door, because 
they go into them oftener, to get the fresh air and sun- 
shine. — Susanna W. Dodds, M. D., in, Health Culture. 

4" * * 
MISTAKEN HOSPITALITY. 



The dietic value that insures the richest reward 
is but scantily honored with the fewest supporters — 
to wit, moderation in eating. Every detail in our meal- 
time environment is equipped with a gluttonous incen- 
tive of some kind. All our food auxiliaries have but 
one mission, and that is to keep the desire to eat in ac- 
tive working order after the wants of nature are sat- 
isfied. Most of our kitchen practice with the cookery 
book tempts the victims of knife and fork folly into 
the same self-indulgent direction. 

The pungent imps of the cruet confuse and demoral- 
ize our natural instincts, till we become so blind and 
so deaf to the warnings of nature, we are easily cajoled 



into a fool's paradise of false flavors where thousands 
prematurely perish from overeating. 

The health-defying hospitality of mistaken friends 
is another stumbling-block in our path, and one, too, 
of the most formidable kind. A foe in friendly guise 
is difficult to overcome. 

When the entreating voice and pleading look ac- 
company the thing we would avoid, we shrink from 
employing our usual methods of defense. How can 
we meet with a frown, an error the whispers of love? 
For instance, " Do have another piece. Mother made 
it on purpose for you." Then again, " What ! Not 
have a taste of Sarah's cake? She made it because 
she knew you were coming." Another time, " It's 
no use saying ' No.' You've got a long walk before 
you, and another slice won't hurt you." But there, 
all my readers know these meal-time importunities 
by heart, for all in turn become victims to this very 
common form of mistaken kindness, to which, at times, 
we yield, much to our discomfort. 

How can we lessen the frequency of this social sin? 
Eating to please others, irrespective of our own per- 
sonal needs, is a physiological transgression of the 
worst kind. 

To be invited to do so is a form of temptation very 
common with the fair sex, who are swayed more by 
impulse and emotion than by the dictates of wisdom. 
Will this social failing be one of the weaknesses of 
the coming woman? 

I guess this wonderful creature we talk so much 
about will present the same delightful tangle of per- 
plexing contradictions, so well known in the present 
day only in another, and perhaps a more trying form. 

It is much to be regretted that feminine love and 
Kindness so often find expression in something nice 
to eat. All boys and girls — almost without exception 
— are the greatest sufferers from this very natural 
form of mistaken kindness. Pastry and sweets are 
the articles usually selected. Grease-soddened tarts 
and cakes are the dietetic fiends that early in life im- 
pair the digestive powers, pamper the appetite and vi- 
tiate the taste. And in addition they teach the young 
how to spend their odd pence foolishly, and also help 
them to acquire the pernicious habit of eating between 
meals. For granny calls at all times and so does Aunt 
Fanny, and they never come without bringing " some- 
thing nice " for the little ones. And if mother remon- 
strates she is stopped at once by the assurance : " It's 
very light, dear ; it can't hurt him." If all these kind- 
hearted persons would only purchase fruit instead of 
pastry, the evils of which we complain would cease. 
-^Health Culture. 

♦ ♦ •* 

" The man who knows when to stop will not lack 
for opportunity." 



34 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



INDIAN SCHOOL EXAMINATION. 



BY W. B. STOVER. 



would cease. Criminal courts and jails would close, 
and this earth would become like heaven itself. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
AN OSTRICH FARM. 



Examination Questions, with best answers given, of an 
examination of the children in the orphanage at Bulsar, 
India, Nov. S. 1904. 

1. What is the first argument that the Bible is the Word 
of God? 

Many of the writers of the Bible have at times 
healed the sick, opened the eyes of the blind, and raised 
the dead. If God were not with them they could not 
have done this. 

2. What is the second argument that the Hindoo books 
are not divine? 

They speak of many gods, and they show lack of 
wisdom on every hand, they not only commit sin, but 
delight in the same. If they were of God, it would be 
not this way. 

3. What is sin? 

Doing what God has commanded not to do, and not 
doing what he has commanded to do, — this is sin. 

4. Tell the different actions of repentance. 

Sorrow for sin, hatred for sin, complete turning 
from sin. 

5. How obtain forgiveness of sin? 

" Without the shedding of blood is no remission." 
Christ is the one sin-offering for all the world. But 
if a Christian sin, his way to pardon is a complete re- 
pentance, restitution, and asking pardon in the name 
of the Lord Jesus Christ. 

6. What evils come from lying? 

If a person who tells lies should tell the truth some- 
time, no one would believe him. He who departs from 
the truth loses all honor, closes the door of opportun- 
ity against himself, and sins against God. 

7. What is prayer? 

Prayer is coming to God, confessing sin, asking par- 
don, praising God and worshiping him. Prevailing 
prayer is in the name of the Lord Jesus. 

8. What are the two great commandments? 

•" Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy 
heart and him only shalt thou serve," and " Thou 
shalt love thy neighbor as thyself." 

9. What is the first necessary thing in establishing 
Christianity? 

The first thing is to be a good Christian yourself, 
then do what you can to bring others into the whole 
truth with yourself. 

10. What advantage would it be to have all the world 
become Christian? 

If all were to become true Christians, war would 
cease, quarrels, fights and jealousy and lying and theft 



Not the least interesting feature of a visit to the 
" City of Angels " is an excursion to the ostrich farm 
situated some miles north of the town. The road lead- 
ing to it runs along the bank of the Los Angeles fiver. 
There are low hills to the left, and beyond the river 
the mountains seem veiled in a soft, peculiar haze. 

At the farm the keeper of the ostriches offers his 
services as a guide, and proffers his whole stock of in- 
formation for the small consideration of twenty-five 
cents per capita. The birds are confined in alfalfa 
yards about fifty feet square — a male, and female in 
each enclosure. It Avas once thought that, the ostrich 
could not be tamed, but this was found to be a mistake, 
for since the experiment of farming for feathers has 
been made, the ostrich has become domesticated. If, 
by chance, a man stands near an ostrich it, will pos- 
sibly pull the buttons from his coat, for it is inordinate- 
ly fond of hard substances. The gizzard of an ostrich 
was once opened, and it was found to contain nearly 
one thousand stones, varying in size from a pea to a 
walnut. Some of the ostriches, when holding their 
heads up in the air, were nearly nine feet high, and 
weighed at least three hundred pounds. 

The ostrich is plucked about every seven months. 
It is first driven into a corner, and its head covered 
with a coarse sack. Two men, by means of a board, 
hold him in position, while the third does the pluck- 
ing. The California ostrich yields about twenty-five 
plumes from each wing. The feathers of the male 
bird are black and white ; those of the female gray and 
brown. 

The wings of the ostrich are of no use for flying, 
as the plumes float loosely about quite unlike the firm, 
compact feathers of flying birds, but when running 
the ostrich uses his wings like sails. Also in walking 
he spreads them out with a fan-like movement and 
when engaged in waltzing, an exercise which these 
birds delight in, the spread-out wings of the female 
give her the appearance of a ballet dancer as she whirls 
round and round in a most amusing dance. 

The tgg of an ostrich is as large as thirty hens' 
eggs, and is said to weigh about four pounds. The 
color is yellowish-white, slightly mottled. In Africa 
the shells are used as water buckets. The African 
cooks the egg by placing it upright on a fire, while 
through a hole in the upper part he stirs the contents 
with a stick. 

A young ostrich just out of the shell is about as 
large as an ordinary hen. . It has a long, soft neck, 
prettily striped in light and dark brown; its legs are 
very long, its eyes large, brown and expressive. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



35 



The ostrich sits upon the eggs for six weeks, but it 
is relieved at night by the male, who assists in the 
process of incubation. If the female is not on time 
in the morning he sometimes goes after her and drives 
her back to her nest. The ostrich is occasionally used 
to ride upon, and surpasses the horse in speed. He 
has very opposite characteristics, being bold, yet gen- 
tle, stupid yet cunning; he is an epicure, but also a 
gourmand ; he can see afar off, yet he stumbles over 
obstacles near by. 

Upon being chased he does not keep on in a straight 
line, but foolishly runs from side to side and finally in 
despair hides his head in the sand, as if thinking him- 
self imseen because his own eyes are hid. Perhaps this 
habit caused Job to say of this ancient bird that " God 
depriveth the ostrich of wisdom ; neither hath he im- 
parted to her understanding." 

It is possible that ostrich farming may become a 
profitable business in this country. Three hundred 
acres of grazing ground will support some thirty-five 
ostriches very well. Lucerne, or alfalfa, a perennial of 
the clover family, furnishes an excellent food for them, 
and possesses the advantage of withstanding seasons 
of drought, so that the day may come when " farming 
for feathers " will not be so small an occupation with 
us as it is at present. — Belle P. Driiry. 
■* ■* ♦ 
"HOBSON'S CHOICE." 



JEWISH SOLDIERS IN THE CZAR'S ARMY. 



Did you know that this familiar phrase, " Hobson's 
choice," preserves the memory of a very good and use- 
ful man? 

Thomas Hobson was born in 1544; he was for sixty 
years a carrier between London and Cambridge, con- 
veying to and from the University letters and packages, 
also* passengers. In addition to his express business, 
he had a livery stable and let horses to the University 
students. He made it a rule that all the horses should 
have, according to their ability, a proper division of 
work and rest. They were taken out in regular order, 
as they stood, beginning with the one nearest the door. 
No choice was allowed, and if any man refused to 
take the animal assigned him he might go without any. 
That or none. Hence the phrase, " Hobson's choice." 

In the spring of 1630, the plague broke out in Eng- 
land. The colleges of Cambridge were closed, and 
among the precautions taken by the authorities to pre- 
vent infection, Hobson was forbidden to go to London. 

He: died in January, 1631, partly, it is said, from 
anxiety and fretting at his enforced leisure. Hobson 
was one of the wealthiest citizens of Cambridge, and 
did much for the benefit of the city, to which he left 
several legacies. His death called forth many poems 
from members of the University, oflScers and students, 
among them two by the poet Milton, when a student 
at Christ's College. — Wide Awake. 



An interesting side light is thrown upon the far 
eastern war and upon the question of Russia's rela- 
tions with its Jewish subjects by an incident reported 
by John F. Bass, staff correspondent of the Daily 
Netvs, in a letter from Manchuria published yesterday. 
While visiting one of the Japanese hospitals after the 
battle of the Yalu Mr. Bass saw a number of the Rus- 
sian wounded. " Do you speak German ? " some of 
these men were asked. " We are Jews," was the reply, 
" and all Jews speak German." A large number of 
them, Mr. Bass adds, were Polish Jews, who had 
fought much better than their commanding officers 
had done. 

The fact speaks eloquently of the patience and obedi- 
ence of the Jewish people in Russia and of the injustice 
and ingratitude of the treatment they have received 
at the hands of the Russian government and the Rus- 
sian people. Summoned to arms as subjects of the 
empire, the Jews are doing their duty loyally in Man- 
churia. Such a spectacle should shame even the tyr- 
rannous bureaucrats who have permitted the Jewish 
outrages into compelling measures of reform on be- 
half of these persecuted people. 
♦ ♦ ^ 
LARGEST FILTRATION SYSTEM. 



Philadelphia now has nearing completion the larg- 
est filtration system in the world. This will include 
four plants with capacities of two hundred and forty- 
eight million, sixty-five million, twenty million and 
twelve million gallons. The consumption is two hun- 
dred and twenty-nine gallons per capita daily, but it 
is hoped to reduce this by the meter system to one 
hundred and fifty gallons. The plants would then 
have sufficient capacity for a population of two mil- 
lion three-hundred thousand if ample clear water stor- 
age were provided. The largest of the two small plants 
will have preliminary filters, as the water is not sub- 
ject to much sedimentation. The slow sand filtration 
system is used, the plants having five, eight, eighteen 
and fifty-five basins each. They range in size from 
sixteen feet by sixty-four feet to one hundred and forty 
feet by two hundred and fifty feet, and are five and one- 
half to six feet deep. The raw water entering at the 
bottom passes upward through three inches of coarse 
gravel, ten inches of screened furnace slag, one and one- 
half inches to three quarters inch in size, twenty-four 
inches of slag three quarters inch to one quarter inch 
in size, and nine inches of compressed sponge. There 
will be a pumping station with six vertical triple ex- 
pansion engines of twenty million gallons capacity. 
♦ <^ * 

People are very poor who have nothing they can- 
not lose. 



36 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



A RIVER THAT LOSES ITSELF. 



There is a beautiful little valley in Eastern Wash- 
ington Territory that is considered one of the most 
singular sections of that part of the country. 

This is the Spokane valley, so narrow for its length 
that it is scarcely more than a rift among the moun- 
tains that surround it. It is thirty miles long, and 
from three to nine miles wide, and through it runs 
the wonderful Spokane river which loses itself in such 
a remarkable way. One can scarcely find a lovelier 
lake than the Coeur d'Alene in which the river takes 
its rise, and from which it flows down into its own 
green valley, carrying with it, as it seems, the lovely 
scenery of beautiful Idaho, in which the lake lies. 

What struck me as very remarkable, was the fact, 
that, though several large rivers that drain the west- 
ern water-shed of the Coeur d'Alene mountains 
pour immense floods of water into the lake, its only 
outlet, the Spokane river, is but a brook in size 
and receives no tributaries of any account until 
below its curious falls. Here is where the river 
loses itself. It flows from the lake scarcely more 
than a brook in size, runs for thirty miles with- 
out much increase in volume, when suddenly it 
swells into a mighty river half a mile wide, whose 
surging, roaring flood sweeps on to the falls over 
which it plunges. 

Where this wonderful increase of volume comes 
from, is one of the mysteries of the river. Men, 
learned in the phenomena of nature, think that the 
water all comes from the lake, but that from the time 
of its rise until the water suddenly surges into the river 
bed, the river loses itself; that is, its upper waters sink 
down through the gravelly soil, and then rise to the 
surface again, after a flow of thirty miles. 

The scenery in the vicinity of the river is very lovely. 
The valley is surrounded on all sides by the Bitter 
Root Mountains and from where the river rises close 
under the timbered mountains of Idaho, until it takes 
its final leap into the caiion, its course is one long 
stretch of enchanting views. But at the falls it reaches 
its highest beauty, not only in the loveliness of the 
surrounding hills, but in the magnificence of the falls 
themselves, and the grand and curious aspect of the 
river. 

Just here, where the river is half a mile wide, it 
is divided by islands of green basaltic rock, against 
which the water rushes in swift rapids ; but the islands 
standing immovable, break the great body of the river, 
and divide it into three wide streams of passionate wa- 
ters, that, curving toward each other, re-unite and 
empty their floods into one common channel. Here, 
for several hundred yards, the waters foam, and toss, 
and churn themselves into whirling rapids, and then 
throw themselves headlong into the caiion below. 



If you could stand upon the rocky ledge below the 
lower waterfall and watch this war of waters, this 
heaving and struggling of the great river within its 
rocky channel, — ah, how you would feel ! and then lift 
your eyes to the gently sloping banks, so green and 
peaceful in the light of sunset over it all — can you im- 
agine anything fairer? 

I think, if you could see it thus, with the grand flow 
of waters near you, and the grand setting of mountains 
so far off, you would wish to stay forever, in the pret- 
ty little town that lies like a lovely picture in its mag- 
nificent framing of water and rock-work. 

The town of Spokane Falls is as bright and busy a 
little city as you can find in the great West. It is built 
upon a gravelly plateau that slopes gently to the river, 
and a future of much commercial and manufacturing 
importance evidently awaits it, owing to its great water 
power, which is nearly thrice that of the Falls of St. 
Anthony, at Minneapolis. ' 

Then, too, its wonderful beauty of location, its fine 
climate and productive soil, together with the min- 
eral wealth of its movmtains, which are threaded with 
valuable veins of ore, go to make the city of Spokane 
Falls one of the richest in natural gifts to be found 
in our wide country. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
HINDOO MUSIC. 



BY MARGUERITE BIXLER. 



The word Veda means " Knowledge." There are 
four Vedas found in the sacred books of the Hindus, 
each of these consisting of three parts. The Rig-Veda, 
contains 1,017 hymns of praise of the personified 
powers of nature. The Yajur-Veda contains hymns 
and text arranged for sacrifice ceremonies. The Lama- 
Veda contains many of the hymns of the Rig- Veda 
rearranged for worship. The Atharv-Veda is com- 
posed of verses used as magical spells for calling down 
or turning ofif evils. All the Vedic hymns are believed 
to have been given by the gods, having no human 
authorship. 

I wish to quote some very interesting statements 
concerning music in India, from Mr. Telang, a Brah- 
man musician, who was interviewed while in the United 
States. 

" Few people know anything about our Indian 
music, and those who know that such a thing exists 
imagine that it is purely a matter of tom-toms. Travel- 
ers have heard the roll of the tommon, the tasha or 
the pakh wag commingle with the shrill scream of the 
sanai, or reed, in some Hindoostanee village. They 
think that is all our music, and in so doing forget that 
our vino, — a stringed instrument with six wire strings 
— is one of the oldest musical instruments in the world. 
Our sitar is as melodious as your mandolin, which 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



37 



it somewliat resembles ; and our sataiii::, which when 
played with a bow, is every bit as soft and humanlike 
in its tones as your violin. A good Hindoo musician, 
will draw as many as seven separate notes from one 
string without sliding his finger up or down the gut, 
or wire. He eii'ects the change by simply pulling the 
string slightly with his hooked finger, and thus increas- 
ing or decreasing the tension at will, and changing the 
notes by the consequent increase or decrease in the 
number of vibrations. I have never seen any of your 
Occidental performers being able to do anything like 
that, but every good musician in my country has to. 
Our Sanskrit works on music are as deep as yours, but 
our written score, our note-system, is not good. It 
provides a separate character for each note in the 
whole compass of melody. Owing to our closer sub- 
division of the chromatic scale, it has been almost im- 
possible for us to adopt your system of writing music. 
It is hoped that Indian music will soon be transcribed 
in the European manner. 
E. Akron, Ohio. 

♦ 4* ♦ 

UNANCHORED. 



BY HOPE NEWCOMER. 



Out upon the great ocean is a large vessel plough- 
ing the deep; it is nearing the shore. 

Now it has reached the landing and many people 
are rushing back and forth across the deck; suddenly 
a great wind rises and the waves begin to roll yet no 
one fears, for they think the vessel is strongly an- 
chored. Nevertheless in a few seconds, with one or 
two great sweeps the wild waves have carried the vessel 
far out into the sea, tossing and playing with it as 
though it were a bunch of thistle down. 

Now the people were left standing upon the shore ; 
some wishing to board the vessel ; others having been 
severed from friends so quickly and with no fare- 
well, watch the wind and its prey with anxious eye. 
They see the ship sink and rise time after time till at 
last it is dashed upon the rocks, a wreck. 

A life boat is immediately sent out, which brings 
many back to shore alive, among whom is the captain, 
who tells the frantic crowd that he had forgotten to 
anchor the vessel and thus it was wrecked. 

Perhaps out upon the sea of life our boat is adrift, 
tossed by the winds of many doctrines, causing only 
a pleasant sensation to us being rocked in the cradle of 
the deep. We wish not to be called sober and long- 
faced Christians and all such names by unprofessing 
people; but rather to enjoy the pleasures of this world 
for a season. 

At last at an unexpected moment' the heavy black 
clouds roll, the wind rises, and the breakers roar, tak- 



ing our little boat with great speed farther and farther 
from shore. 

Finally the great wave of neglect has dashed it upon 
the rock of unbelief and our boat is wrecked. Only be- 
cause after having landed it at the shore of Christian 
faith we left it unanchored. 
Lanark, III. 

♦ <* ♦ 
NORTH POLE. 



A NEW scheme for a north pole expedition was de- 
scribed by M. Charles Bernard at a meeting of about 
fifty men of science held in the house of the Prince 
of Monaco, in Paris, recently. M. Bernard explained 
at length why the only feasible and rational route of 
penetration of the Polar Sea was a little north of that 
followed by Fram. The expedition ought to start 
from a Norwegian port, cross the southern portion of 
Barent's Sea, take in dogs at Karabola, coast along 
Yalmal, ship its coal at Port Dickson, transported 
thither by special steamer, pass at the end of the sum- 
mer along the Peninsula of Taimyr, arrive at the end 
of the autumn at the islands of New Siberia, and then, 
instead of going northward, as did Fram, manage at 
all costs, even if it be necessary to winter in the Laik- 
hofif or Bennett Island, to reach a point on the one 
hundred and fiftieth degree of east longitude. Thence 
the ship or ships need only drift with the ice. M. 
Bernard urges the utility of having the expedition 
composed of two vessels in touch with each other by 
means of wireless telegraphy. The expedition should 
take three years, but should be provisioned for five. 
It would not cost more than $300,000. The assembled 
company signed a memorandum declaring this expedi- 
tion to be of scientific utility. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
INTELLIGENCE OF DOGS. 



A SHEPHERD in Scotland, to prove the value of his 
dog, which was lying before the fire in the house where 
we were talking, said to me in the middle of a sen- 
tence concerning something else : " I'm thinking, sir, 
the cow is in the potatoes." The dog, which appeared 
to be asleep, immediately jumped up, and leaping 
through the open window, scrambled up the turf roof 
of the house, where he could see the potato field. He 
then, not seeing the cow, ran and looked into the byre, 
where she was, and finding that all was right, came 
back to the house. The shepherd said the same thing 
again, when the dog once more made his patrol. But 
on the doubt being uttered a third time it got up, looked 
at its master, and when he laughed, growled and 
curled up again by the fire. 

* * * 

The papers described a brutal prize fight go through 
the mail at pound rates. 



38 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



THE INGLENOOK 

A Weekly Magazine 

PUBLISHED BY 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription price, $1.00 per Annum, in Advance. 

E. M. Co1)b, Editor. 

The Inglenoolc contains twenty-four pages weekly, devoted 
to the intellectual, moral and spiritual interests of the young. 
Each department is especially designed to fill its particular 
sphere in the home. 

Contributions are solicited. Articles submitted are adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine. A strong effort will 
be made to develop the latent talent of the constituency. 

Sample copies will be furnished upon application. Agents 
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mission. Change of address can only be made when the old 
address, as well as the new, is given. Club rates for Sunday 
schools and other religious organizations. Address as above. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



IRRETRIEVABLE MISTAKES. 



There are two kinds of mistakes. There are mis- 
takes which can be corrected, and then there are ir- 
retrievable ones. Of the two kinds perhaps the latter 
is the more serious for this reason, that when once 
committed they can never be altered. The mistakes 
which belong to the former class are oftentimes mend- 
ed by the one who has made the mistake, when at- 
tention has been called to his error, and by so doing he 
teaches the lesson that all men are subject to mistakes. 
Further, by admitting and acknowledging his wrong, 
he regains the respect and influence he has lost. It 
makes him have more charity for others who have gone 
astray. 

Mistakes of this class have really been helpful to the 
world. The wigwam of the savage contrasted with 
the brownstone front on Madison Square shows how 
men have improved by mistakes. Mr. Kennedy, one 
of the best architects in the State of Indiana, says of 
the hundreds of bridges which he has built, no two 
have ever been made alike, and in all probability the 
ones he will build in the future will dififer from each 
other, since he expects to improve each time by fail- 
ures, short-sightedness and mistakes in the preceding 
ones. 

Sadness comes and comes to stay, generally, when 
we learn of mistakes that have been made that are ir- 
retrievable. We pause to think a moment of the in- 
numerable thousands who have wept, and even died, 
because some one has made the awful mistake of intro- 
ducing the liquor traffic into our country. What the 
temperance societies may do, ultimately, is yet un- 
known. But whatever the result may be, the horrible 
deeds that have already gone down on record can never 
be corrected. The sorrows, deprivations and deaths, 
the wretchedness, misery and woe, the debauchery, ig- 
nominy and crime can never be supplanted with loyal- 
ty, worship and sacrifice, with time, means and talent, 
with incessant effort, ceaseless toil and united energv. 



What has been done is done forever. Good deeds may 
be done henceforward and forever, but they are the 
results of the moments in which they were committed. 
They are not related to or responsible for evil deeds 
of other days and years. A hasty word spoken cannot 
be covered up by a thousand good ones. 

A gentleman who once ordered a boy to pluck the 
feathers from a dead goose while going home, upon 
reaching home ordered him to retrace his steps and 
pick up the feathers which the wind had blown hither 
and thither. The boy at once saw that his task was 
impossible, his steps were irretrievable. So it is with 
our words and hasty deeds. When a word has once 
escaped the lips it immediately sets sail upon the 
turbulent, tempestuous sea of gossip and unkind crit- 
icism, and in spite of all the life preservers which char- 
ity can cast from the deck, or all the oil that love may 
pour on the troubled waters, or the efforts of the life- 
boat of hope, it invariably is kept out of reach of all 
these means of salvation by the angry elements. The 
inhabitants of this sea greedily feast upon these mis- 
takes that satisfy their wicked appetites, by gnawing at 
the very vitals of the unfortunate one who has made 
the mistake. 

For one of this kind of mistakes Moses was for- 
bidden to enter the promised land, David was not al- 
lowed to build the temple, and Judas hanged himself. 

iff ^ <♦ 
PUTTING IN TIME. 



Not many people are living who have not heard the 
expression, " I can put in the time some way." ■ We 
mean that while we are waiting for some one or some- 
thing we will be doing something or other, and we do 
not exactly know what, but that we will while away 
the intervening time in some fashion. 

Did it ever occur to you that no one puts in time 
with a definite plan? At a railway depot the man who 
is " putting in time " walking up and down the plat- 
form, looking up the railroad track both ways, count- 
ing ties and telegraph poles, etc., is aimlessly occupy- 
ing time. A strange minister at church is often so- 
licited to " take up the time," and he puts in his time 
very similar to the man at the depot ; he walks up and 
down his subject, looking both ways up the track and 
sees nothing coming. 

The very expression itself begs the question and is 
an admission on the face of it that time is being put 
into something. The question is. Into what is it be- 
ing put? Evidently it is being put into a hole — the 
big, black, bottomless pit of vacuity. Nothing ever 
comes out of that pit, though hours of precious time 
often flow in. The pit of nothingness is one of the 
most greedy maws in the universe, and yet one of 
the least profitable. Time is far too valuable to be 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



39 



thrown in here. Time is one tiling that man cannot 
make, or ever hope to make, but he has plenty of it 
at his command, whether he asks for it or not, whether 
he pays for it or not, or whether he uses it or not. But 
he has it only once ; once that it is in his hands he 
must use it, or lose it ; it is there, but not to stay ; it 
is constantly on the move, like the sand in the hour- 
glass. Though it is given most freely, paradoxical as 
it may seem, it is given most grudgingly — a second at 
a time, and not for a king's ransom a shred more than 
a second at a time. 

More than that, time is an essential element of which 
everything else is made that has any value. It is the 
universal solvent sought by all the philosophers and 
inventors of the world. By wisdom and prudence it 
may be transformed into innumerable entities which 
are of incalculable value. No one would tliink of 
poking diamonds into a rat hole or dollars through a 
crack in the floor, and yet the same individual has 
been guilty of pouring precious time, by the hour, into 
this sea of oblivion. The only way to overcome this 
fault is to have a plan ready, because, as a matter of 
course, you will have no time to go after it when you 
need it. 

Time is the most volatile and effervescent of all 
substances. You can put it into a book, an essay, a 
sermon. Sabbath-school lesson, prayer meeting topic, 
the Word of God, a letter of friendship or business, 
a plan for to-morrow, next week or next year. 

The success of a man does hot depend upon the 
hours between whistles or bells. Any business man is 
supposed to begin and quit on time and be faithfully 
and diligently employed during work and study hours, 
but success largely depends upon the use of the hours 
outside of the daily program or, in other words, suc- 
cess depends almost entirely upon how we " put in 
time." 

♦ ♦ 4> 

IN HIS OWN COIN. 



In the early history of the Jews we have an account 
of two characters, Haman and Mordecai, who, by vir- 
tue of conditions, were avowed enemies. As a matter 
of course, the one who had power to change conditions 
didn't want them changed ; the one who was pow- 
erless, so far as the change of conditions was con- 
cerned, would have given all he possessed for the bet- 
terment of conditions. The climax was finally reached 
in the preparation of a gallows for Mordecai by 
Haman; not that Mordecai deserved to be hanged, 
but that Haman might be avenged. When execution 
day came it so happened that conditions were changed 
to the extent that Haman actually was hanged on the 
very gallows that he had prepared for Mordecai. 



This is only one case of a thousand, some of which 
the world knows and some of which it will never 
know, where the fundamental principles of this law 
have been fully carried out. 

The very fact that Haman wanted to hang Mordecai 
revealed the fact that conditions existed in his breast 
that showed him to be an eligible applicant for the 
gallows. 

When Nathan went to David for the adjustment 
of a certain matter, in which it required the decision 
of the king, David readily passed sentence on his own 
life for the reason he thought he was passing sentence 
on someone else. When Nathan told him, " Thou art 
the man," he began to realize that he had simply been 
hanged on the gallows that he had prepared for an- 
other ; or, in other words he was getting pay " in his 
own coin. 

In all probability this is what the Savior of men re- 
ferred to in his great constitution of the church, the 
sermon on the Mount, when he said, " Judge not that 
ye be not judged, for with what judgment ye judge ye 
shall be judged." No doubt this moral advice was 
given to allow men to escape excution of their own 
mandates, because many men have passed judgment 
upon themselves in condemning others. 

All the examples illustrating the fulfillment of this 
law were not given in olden times. Our age seems 
to be replete with demonstrations strikingly similar; 
so much so that one of our modern philosophers has 
dressed the thought in the words, " He who digs a 
pit for another, falls into it himself." 

It is not within the scope of this article to discuss 
whether such things happen or whether they are wrecks 
which naturally result from a broken moral law, or 
whether the Omnipotent carefully guides such actions 
to a common destiny, but it is written rather as a finger- 
board pointing to the fact above mentioned that, " his- 
tory repeats itself," and what was written thousands of 
years ago for the good of mankind is good for us to- 
day, because people of different ages, surrounded by 
similar conditions, are liable to be benefited by the 
same auxiliaries. 

Some one has said that " It is a long lane that has 
no turn," nevertheless there are such lanes. Again 
it is said, " Truth crushed to earth will rise again." 
It lies buried a long while sometimes, yet it finally 
rises. Again, " With what measure ye mete it shall 
be measured to you again." It so happens occasionally 
that considerable time passes before your coin returns, 
but when it comes it is generally recognized to be your 
own coin. So don't set traps for another that you 
would not be perfectly willing to be found fast in your- 
self. Don't build a gallows for another that you would 
be ashamed to have your body found hanging upon. 



40 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



C-Q-rrenrxt Hap^ez^.lr^.g's 



Two collisions between ferry boats on Long Island 
Sound, near New York were caused' by a dense fog 
and a drizzling rain which hung over those waters. 

* ♦> ■* 

The Americans do not possess all the patriotism in 
the world. A Spanish lady recently refused $300,000 
for a portrait of a famous Spaniard, and sent the 
American millionaire away disappointed. She after- 
wards bequeathed it to the Spanish museum. 

* ♦ ♦ 

A BAND of Macedonian gypsies, who are believed to 
be a horde of thieves, have, of late, been visiting Eng- 
land. The policemen are kept busy in keeping the 
tribe on the move. The gypsies say, " People very 
kind; police no good." It has been hinted in a round 
about way that they will accept a bribe of $250 to leave 
the country. Strange that so soon they have " caught 
on " to the English tips. 

<5> ♦ ♦ 

In a dense fog which darkened the streets of Paris, 
six people were killed in a collision between cars. A 
score of others were injured. 
<{> <{> <l> 

It is reported from Alcazar, a town about sixteen 
miles from Tangier, Africa, that the tribesmen have 
surrounded Alcazar and threaten to sack the town 
unless the French consul and one of the British sub- 
jects are handed over to them. 

* ♦ ♦ 

One of the greatest blizzards in fifteen years passed 

over the northern part of the United States last week 

destroying many oil derricks, houses and other 

property through Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania. 

<ft 4> <^ 

The blizzards of the north merged into drenching 

rains farther south. From the Ohio river to the Gulf, 

for thirty-six hours the land was completely soaked. 

At Nashville, Tenn., the mercury fell nine degrees 

an hour for a while. 

h|> 4> 4> 

During the past week many parts of the United 
States have experienced some very disagreeable 
weather. The New England coast was visited by one 
of the worst blizzards in many years. New York, 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island were right in the path 
of the storm and a great amount of snow fell in these 
states. 

* 4» ♦ 

The Russian Baltic fleet has arrived at Cape Good 
Hope. This the first time for a long while that the 
Russian fleet has been in real good hope. 



The magnificent home of William Patterson, the 
distiller, at Anchorage, a suburb of Louisville, Ky., was 
burned quite recently with its contents. The loss is 
about $60,000, partially insured. Had the distillery 
burned it would have been money in pocket, instead of 
the dwelling which took money out of pocket. 

* * * 

A FREIGHT engine and four cars were wrecked near 
Ft. Wayne, Ind., by a couple of fourteen-year-old boys 
who threw some rails across the track to see what 
would happen. They were arrested. 

* * <• 

Ten earthquakes took place, the last one very severe, 
at Panama and frightened the residents so badly that 
they camped in the streets. 

Hon. W. B. Innes, of Vancouver Island, who has 
been for some time a member of the British Columbian 
legislature for Albernia, is candidate for the governor- 
ship of Yukon. 

* * * 

Phoenix, Ariz., a city of fifteen thousand inhabi- 
tants, deserves some public sympathy. At least one- 
third of the population are thin, wretched, homesick 
creatures, many of them consumptives of the hopeless 
type, and in many cases utterly destitute. Emphatic 
protests are being made by the residents, who are 
natives and who own property, against sending into 
their midst these invalids who are past recovery. In a 
good many places physicians in their meetings have 
deliberated upon this subject and decided that it is not 
best to continue this practice. 

* * * 

The business district of Sioux City, Iowa, suffered 
a two million dollar loss last week, which consisted 
of almost two entire blocks. One man lost his life. 

* * * 

The supply of food is said to be running short in 

many towns between Evansville, Ind., and Paducah, 

Ky., where the supplies are brought in by boat and the 

blocking of navigation makes their situation more 

serious. 

<{. ^ 4> 

Peter, the King of Servia, has signed the new press 
law abolishing the freedom of the press. This is one 
step downward in the scale of civilization. 
■ * * ♦ 

The drought which has prevailed in Illinois, Indi- 
ana, Ohio and Pennsylvania has been broken recently 
by a liberal downpour of rain. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



41 



About a million messages are said to be sent over 
the world's telegraph lines every twenty-four hours. 
It is sixty years now since the first telegraphic message 
was sent by the Morse system from Baltimore to 
Washington. This is evidence of some progress in the 
last half century. 

* ♦ * 

The board of health in Mexico denies the reports 
given out regarding starvation, and disease in the 
northwestern part of the state of Sinaloa. 
4* ♦ * 

About a mile of gas pipe lines of the Kansas Natural 
Gas Company was blown up by masked men. The 
farmers of the section through which the line passes 
are hostile to the company, on the grounds that it is 
a foreign corporation. To date no arrests have been 
made. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Hugh Kelly, an employe of the Hudson Coal 
company of New York, while at work up on the top 
of a thirty-foot trestle, up which big steel cars, each 
carrying fifty tons of coal, are run from the barges, 
met with a serious accident. Kelly had charge of 
the cars, fastening the brakes, before they were emptied 
into the chute, and while thus engaged, Thomas Hag- 
gerty, another employe, who was a life-long friend of 
Kelly, pulled the lever which. releases the coal from the 
bottom of the car. Kelly fell with the coal thirty feet 
and was buried under tons of it. A long piece of 
gas pipe was shoved down through the coal and 
fortunately reached the entombed man. He was res- 
cued and found that he had clinched his teeth like a 
vise on the end of the gas pipe. An examination by 
the physicians proved that his injuries were fatal. 

♦ * * 

A CARRIER pigeon bearing on one of its legs the 
inscription " A. C. H. 396," arrived in Utica, N. Y., 
Dec. 21. The bird is thought to be the property of 
Adolph C. Ham, a pigeon farmer, who went to South- 
ern California, about a year ago, taking his pigeons 
with him. If this is so, the long flight of the bird is 

unparalleled. 

♦ ■♦ ♦ 

RECAPITULATION OF THE ORIENTAL WAR. 



Five Causes. 

1. After Boxer disturbance, powers agreed to main- 
tain territorial integrity of China. Russia reserved 
right to occupy Manchuria, evacuating at the resto- 
ration of peace. Russia failed to evacuate when peace 
was obtained, to which Japan objected. 

2. Japan feared that, in case Russia absorbed Man- 
churia, she would also absorb Korea. 

3. Russian occupancy of Korea would vitally re- 
strict commerce and peaceful activity of Japan in 
Koi;ea, which is her best field. 



4. The unquestionable evidence that Russia fully 
intended to technically fulfill the last will and testa- 
ment of Peter The Great. 

5. The war-like preparations of both countries, dur- 
ing their peaceful diplomatic negotiations. 

A Synoptic Review. 

1. February, 1904, the engagement of the Russian 
and Japanese fleets. 

2. March, 1904, the blockading of the harbor at 
Port Arthur. 

3. April, 1904, the first great naval battle ; Makaroff 
killed. 

4: May, 1904, first land engagement. 

5. June, 1904, great naval fight and the surrounding 
of Port Arthur by the land forces. 

6. July, 1904, general assault by land and sea. 

7. August, 1904, the retreat of Russian forces and 
capture of outer forts. 

8. September, 1904, heavy skirmishing on land and 
water. 

9. October, 1904, tunneling and explosion of mines. 

10. November, 1904, capture of 203-Meter Hill. 

11. Decenxber, 1904, destruction of fleet in Road- 
stead, and recapture of last line of forts. 

12. January, 1905, final surrender of Stoessel. 

Czar's Sacrifice. 

Beside an inestimable loss of prestige and influence 
the surrender of Port Arthur means to Russia the loss 
of: Buildings, fortifications, etc., $207,000,000; am- 
munition and guns $6,000,000 ; fleet destroyed $78,000,- 
000; sundry expenses $9,000,000; total $300,000,000. 
Original garrison 40,000 men ; present garrison 12,000 
men; sick and wounded in hospital 15,000 men; killed 
and died of wounds 13,000 men; total dead and dis- 
abled 28,000 men. 

Mikado's Sacrifice. 

The Japanese loss is difficult to determine. To say 
the least, it is a dearly bought prize. It is estimated 
that General Nogi had 185,000 men. His total losses, 
by sickness, wounds and death, according to best 
authority, are 70,000 men. Having received 40,000 re- 
inforcements, leaves him at present 155,000 men. 

All things considered, Russia has not fallen, neither 
has Japan, only Port Arthur; it is only the beginning 
of the end; it may require a longer time for Russia to 
retake Port Arthur than it has for Japan to secure it. 
In the world's great catalogue are to be found the 
sieges of Troy, Sedan, Jerusalem, Constantinople, 
Babylon, Vicksburg, Richmond, etc., but nowhere do 
we find one that compares with Port Arthur in powers 
of endurance against an eleven-month siege of long 
range rifles, machine guns, mortars, high-power guns, 
Catling and Hotchkiss, and the most modern patterns 
of mines, torpedoes and electrical appliances. 



42 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




LIFE. 



BY CHAS. J. CONNER. 



Life, so wonderful, so grand, so infinite; the tide of 
ambition, the flood of hope, the love of conquest. Mys- 
tery of mystery ! To live, to die, and then to live again 
a better, brighter, fairer, grander life, this is the life 
of man, — the Life immortal. 

As we listen to nature singing her celestial song; 
as we look at the universe and wonder at its grandeur, 
we do not think how much sweeter is the song of life, 
how much grander is the harmony of immortal souls. 

Born; so comes into this world, this mighty sphere, 
a soul endowed with intellect, love, faith and hope 
to solve the problem of life. 

What hopes are centered in the loves that bear the 
firstborn child ? What ecstasy doth entwine the hearts 
that see their own? What love doth hold in con- 
stancy each vital part, born, then rocked upon the 
pillowed bosom with tender words of love? The child 
awakens to life from mystery's dream, the arbor of 
fond hopes to carry forth the crown of life and rule 
in its own kingdom, king of kings until the Master 
calls it home. 

Its first lesson from nature's school, a mother's love, 
embodies all the stage of infancy ; then from the tender 
bud of babyhood there blooms to childhood myriads 
of visions of a world of ecstasy. In this frail bark, 
ere he sets sail upon the stormy sea of life, he builds 
little ships that are the guiding boats through life's 
long voyage. Ships of simple truthfulness, and honest 
love — childhood's bark, heaven's best reflection, life's 
sweetest poetry fades into oblivion. Just entering up- 
on the sea we behold the youth full of hope and love, 
imagination and desire; the student with bubbling 
honors breaking fast ; the soldier seeking laurels in the 
field, and the lover with unconscious vows. The sea 
rolls high, the storm is on, and no more the calm 
and peaceful waters of the past. Life's bark adrift ! A 
wreck upon the rocks, another, still another ; but look ! 
Amid the storm-swept sea a bark glides onward, an- 
other, still another. They have passed the rocks and 
are still sailing in the deep and tranquil waters of man- 
hood. Fragments of wrecks s'till float about the sea. 

Our hero has learned the dangers of the rocks, the 
storms and the tempest, and now sails out upon the 
deep a better mariner. The bravest mariner will an- 
chor ere he thinks his voyage half spent, knowing that 



the lighthouse in the sea no more shows the rocks ; he 
looks for another light to guide him, — the Light of Di- 
vine guidance, and hopes for the better land upon 
the golden shore. He looks back and thinks of his 
childhood days, with love and reverence. Enriched 
with his cargo, he journeys slowly back again to the 
shore, where he first built his ship when a child; 
he anchors there and lives his childhood o'er again in 
the sublimity of old age. Once again he enjoys life's 
sweetest poetry, heaven's best reflection. 

As his children gather round, he sees himself in 
younger years; he lives his childhood over again in 
their pastimes, and shares alike their joys and sorrows. 

He has journeyed o'er the sea of life and now views 
with tender love the destiny of man. Death ? no, there 
is no death. \Vhat we call death is but the entrance 
to the higher life, — the life; immortal. He views what 
millions never see, old age, the golden sunset in the 
autumnal sky. The sun slowly sets; some last rays 
still linger on the by-gone shores. He looks backward, 
and as he bids us farewell, life's bark glides on unseen 
to a fairer, brighter land, a better home. The sun has 
set, more beautiful with thought, more perfect with 
reason, more sublime with unity, more noble with 
sacrifice, the soul departs through the unseen gates 
of Eternity. 

Elgin, III., §10 Highland Ave. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
A NATION OF HOUSEKEEPERS. 



A FAVORITE fling of the French at the English has 
always been that the latter are a nation of shopkeepers. 
An English woman has now called Americans " a na- 
tion of housekeepers." During a recent visit to this 
country she was struck by the fact that so many Amer- 
ican women of means and refinement either " do their 
own work " or actively superintend the domestic ar- 
rangements, taking a pride in this duty. Our friend 
was surprised to learn that " an American woman will 
spend the forenoon in cooking or dusting or cleaning, 
then dress herself like a duchess and sally forth to 
the meeting of a fashionable club, where she is to read 
a learned paper, like as not, or else call a carriage and 
make a round of social calls. And her standing does 
not seem to be impaired in the least by the fact that 
during part of the day she has done the work of a 
menial, nor has it affected her own personal attractive- 
ness." 

No other woman has done so much as the American 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



43 



to emphasize the dignity of labor. The snobbish idea 
that good work, of whatever kind, can possibly be a, 
disgrace has never gained much foothold in this coun- 
try. What more noble and useful work could there 
be than making a home comfortable for its inmates? 
It is a work that demands the highest degree of skill, 
and it is one that too often, unfortunately, must be 
intrusted to incompetent servants. The American 
woman does take a pride in looking well after the af- 
fairs of her household, nor does the fact in the least 
impair her effectiveness along other lines of endeavor. 
The average American housewife is much more of 
an " all-round woman " than her English sister. It is 
not surprising that her versatility should be the subject 



of admiring comment. 



♦J* ♦♦♦ *$* 



THE POWER OF SILENCE. 



Josh Billings said : " Silence is a hard argument 
to beat." Sometimes silence is the severest rebuke, 
the most scathing expression of the deepest feeling. 
A Boston correspondent of the Providence Journal 
relates an incident which illustrates the power of si- 
lence, and conveys at the same time several valuable 
lessons : 

One of the guests at a dinner party of gentlemen was 
known to have been at one time a chronic drunkard, 
although, after a severe struggle, he had succeeded in 
breaking away from the dreadful habit of intemper- 
ance. His only safety lay in total abstinence, and 
although on this occasion wine was abundant, he did 
not taste it. 

At length it occurred to the host that a practical jest 
would be amusing, and by his direction, the waiter 
filled the tumbler of this guest with gin instead of 
water, and there being no reason for suspecting the 
evil, the dipsomaniac raised it to his lips. The instant 
he tasted it, he comprehended what he had done, and 
without a word, he set his glass down, and left the 
room. His nearest neighbor, astonished at his uncere- 
monious leave-taking, turned to see what was the mat- 
ter, when the grins of the waiter called his attention 
to the still full tumbler. He took it up, examined the 
contents, and understanding in turn the cruel joke 
that had been played, followed the example of the 
victim, and with only a glance of indignation, by way 
of farewell to the host, he, too, left the room and house. 
His neighbor in turn sought and found the explanation 
of this singular breach of etiquette, and the action of 
the others having furnished him a clew to the sharpest 
method of expressing the indignation any right-minded 
man must feel, he, in turn, contemptuously left the 
table. 

To cut the matter short, every guest in turn depart- 
ed in utter silence, until the giver of the feast was 



left to digest as best he might this bitter, but most 
richly merited rebuke upon his outrageous conduct. 
It is a satisfaction to be able to add that this dipso- 
maniac had the courage and presence of mind to get 
into a carriage and drive home at once, where he re- 
mained until he had conquered the cravings excited 
by the taste of alcohol he had unwittingly taken. 

<♦ ♦ ♦ 
A HEAVEN OF OUR HOME. 



Not long ago a man was called to an educational 
position of great honor, one that involved larger so- 
cial obligations than he and his wife had been accus- 
tomed to meet. She shrank from the new duties which 
would be laid upon her, chiefly from a sense of not 
having kept pace, intellectually, with her husband 
during their years of married life. Their income had 
been small, and she had been her own housemaid as 
well as a devoted mother to their three boys. This left 
little leisure for reading or study, and she was con- 
scious that her husband had outstripped her in mental 
growth. When she expressed her misgivings to him 
he replied, " Never mind, my dear, you have made 
a heaven of my home." The answer shows something 
more than mere conjugal tenderness. It reveals a 
principle in human development. This woman, no less 
than her husband had rriade solid gains in the years 
they had lived together. Over against his riches of 
intellect she could place a wealth of graces in charac- 
ter which fitted her to adorn any social position. In 
making a heaven of their home she had grown strong 
in patience, tact, sympathy, unselfishness and the wis- 
dom that comes from daily communion with God. 
These qualities have a positive value that is too often 
overlooked nowadays. Ambition for self-development 
is characteristic of the modern woman but she is prone 
to consider books, travel and cultivated society as the 
only means to this end. Yet the making of a home 
that is like heaven to husband and children is really 
a more efficient aid to true culture, because it exercises 
the soul as well as the brain. 

♦ ■* ♦ 

We cannot all have full brains but we can all have 
full hearts. And being well equipped in our hearts, 
if we are not well equipped in our heads to impart 
instruction to our pupils, we are at least well equipped 
to inspire them to learn themselves. Many an ig- 
norant mother has inspired her boy to reach out to 
heights of knowledge of which she had never so much 
as heard. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

•"There's so much bad in the best of us. 
And so much good in the worst of us, 
That it hardly behooves any of us. 
To say anything of the rest of us." 



44 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

Reading Circle and Christian Workers' Topics 

By EUZABETH S. BOSENBEBaEB 

>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»»»»»» M «»»»< 



THE JOURNEY HEAVENWARD. 

January 22. Heb. 13:14-21. 

I. Where Believers Walk. 

1. Old Paths Jer. 6: 16 

2. Not in Counsel of Ungodly, Psa. .1 : 1 

3. Not After the World Eph. 2: 2 

II. How Believers Walk. 

1. By Faith, 2 Cor. 5:7 

2. In Safety Psa. 23: 4 

3. Satisfied, Philpp. 4: 11 

III. Some of the Travelers. 

I.Abraham, Heb. 11:8 

2. Isaac and Jacob, Heb. 1 1 : 9 

3. Women Heb. 11:35 

4. Many Others Heb. 11: 13 

5. Others, Heb. 11:32 

6. Us, Heb. 11:40 

IV. Glorious End, 1 Peter 1:4 

4> 4> 4> 
For January 22, 1905. 
Topic. — The Journey Heavenward. 

Text. — For here we have no continuing city, but we seek 
one to come. Hebrews 13: 14-21. 

References. 

Psalm 1:1; I Samuel 15:18; Numbers 9:23; 2 
Corinthians 5:7; Mark 6:8; Revelation 3 : 21 ; 2 Peter 
i:ii; Revelation 7:13, 14; John 13:36; Hebrews 
10 : 34 ; Acts 7 : 55 ; Matthevir 8:11. 
Journeying. 

If we could see this large company of pilgrims 
that are traveling homeward we would think of John's 
vision, — " a great multitude which no man could num- 
ber, of all nations, and kindreds, and peoples, and 
tongues, who stood before the throne, and before the 
Lamb clothed with white robes, and palms in their 
hands." You and I are not alone in this narrow way, 
there are many other pilgrims. Whatever trials and 
difficulties you may have, are common to other pil- 
grims too. Read again the story of our journey to 
heaven in Pilgrim's Progress. " I beheld then that 
they all went on till they came to the foot of the hill 
Difficulty, at the bottom of which there was a spring. 
There were also in the same place two other ways 
"besides that which came straight from the gate: one 
turned to the left hand and the other to the right, at 
the bottom of the hill ; but the narrow way lay right up 
the hill and the one going up the side of the hill 
is called Difficulty. Christian began to go up the 
hill. The other two came also to the foot of the hill. 
But when they saw that the hill was steep and high 
and that there were two other ways to go; and sup- 



posing that these two ways might meet again with 
that which Christian went, on the other side of the 
hill ; therefore they were resolved to go in those ways. 
Now the name of one of those ways was Danger, and 
the name of the other Destruction. So the one took 
the way which is called Danger; which led him into 
a great wood; and the other took directly up the way 
to Destruction, which led him into a wide field, full 
of dark mountains, where he stumbled and fell, and 
rose no more." 

Only the narrow path leads straight to the Celes- 
tial city, but we step aside because it seems easier, the 
meadows are green and restful, the narrow path be- 
comes wearisome, but in the green meadows lurk dan- 
gers of every sort. Right up the side of the hill Dif- 
ficulty are traveling heroes, men who are ready to en- 
dure all things for Jesus' sake. 

" Lead, kindly Light, amid the encircling gloom. 
Lead thou me on; 
The night is dark, and I am far from home 

Lead thou me on. 
Keep thou my feet, I do not ask to see 
The distant scene, one step enough for me." 

— Henry Newman. 

Walking with Jesus. 

Does Jesus walk with you? If you are keeping 
close by his side your work will be easier, your cross 
lighter, and every day will mark the milestones near- 
er heaven. Is there no lesson for us in the unstinted 
way Jesus gave himself daily for others ? Does it not 
seem as if Christ gave as much of himself before he 
came to the cross as he gave on the cross? O this 
cheap discipleship ! It keeps us from church on rainy 
Sundays ; it is afraid of a headache if it teaches a Sun- 
day-school class; it never has time to call on the sick, 
or on a stranger. What does more to hurt the influ- 
ence of the church, than the church members who are 
always hunting for the easiest place where they can 
give the least of themselves in Christian service! It 
is different when we walk with Jesus. 

Some people are hunting crosses with no. nails in 
them. 

A Parsee Pilgrim. 

As a lad of eighteen, belonging to a wealthy family 
and the only child spared out of seven he was special- 
ly loved. As a youth, a great mathematician, he went 
to Esplanade College against the will of his relatives. 
Here he watched the life of one of his teachers, an 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



45 



English clergyman ; to use his own words, " I longed 
for some show of temper, some little word of anger, 
but there was none. Through buffeting and abuse in 
street preaching, he was always gentle, and though I 
spurned the Christian religion, I respected its hum- 
ble follower." But this teacher became ill, and his 
successor was unkind, and selfish and harsh. One 
morning with home work correct, at the head of his 
class of fifty-four — a place he kept for five years — he 
was told in anger, " Go down to the bottom of the 
class." This made him angry, "What for?" he 
asked, stamping his foot. " Because I told you to, 
you insolent youth," was the reply. " I will leave the 
college " said the student, but as he took his place at 
the foot of the class, who should he see standing be- 
fore him, but the dear old clergyman who had just 
come in for a moment. He understood the situation, 
but not wishing to blame the teacher publicly, he only 
said, " I am so sorry that this has happened, go to my 
study please, and wait until I come, it may be hours 
for I am going to a sick bed ; but do not go away until 
I see you. It was four in the afternoon when the stu- 
dent first went up and as hour after hour went by he 
still lingered, for on a table near the window he had 
found the Bible. He commenced reading at the fifth 
chapter of Matthew ; the stars came out in the sky and 
still he read on to the tenth chapter. When the cler- 
gyman came he found a kneeling figure, and thinking 
he was asleep, he touched him. The face was lifted, 
then came the thrilling words, " Thy God shall be my 
God." 

Then came persecution. His parents starved them- 
selves to death, his wife committed suicide, he the idol- 
ized, the son of so wealthy and old a family had become 
a Christian dog, better death than such degradation. 
He stood alone by Christ's side, the first one of the 
Parsees, but he has been followed by 90,000 more. 
Imprisonment, perils by water, attempts to poison him, 
storming, had no power to turn him back. For fifty- 
five years, an earnest Christian using voice, talent, 
and money for Jesus to the very last. He died Au- 
gust 14 1894. 

Leam More About Our Destination. 

Some of us are near our journey's end, others are 
only starting out ; all of us should be anxious to learn 
more about heaven. The journey there will take 
but a few years, then we shall remain in heaven. 
Read again Revelation 10 and see what God is 
making ready for the weary travelers. What treasure 
shall we lay at the feet of Jesus ? 

"Dying! ah it is easy 

To slight the Master's call — 

To sit with folded hands and sing, 

O, crown him Lord of all." 

" But where are the gems to lay at his feet, 
Which may sparkle some day in his crown complete?" 



Topics for Discussion. 

1. Who is our guide in this journey? Psalm 73: 
24. 

2. When will earth's travelers finally be separated? 
Matthew 10:30; Matthew 10:49; Matthew 3:12. 

3. If we travel as servants of Jesus, what shall be 
our reward? John 12:26; John 17:22. 

4. What net is spread for the feet of pilgrims? 
Proverbs 29: 5; Psalm 17: 4. 

5. Those who stop, and turn aside, are condemned. 
2 Timothy 4: 10. 

6. Why do we look to God for sustenance on this 
journey? i Kings 19:7. 

7. Do we know the length of our journey? Nehe- 
miah 2:6; Psalm 39:5. 

8. How shall we walk heavenward? i Thesa- 
lonians 2:12. 

♦ 4* ♦ 

NEW NAMES. 



2600. Isabella Irvin, Wooster, Ohio, R. R. No. 8. 

2601. T. C. Wieand, Wooster, Ohio, R. R. No. 8. 

2602. J. D. Weidman, Wooster, Ohio, R. R. No. 8. 

2603. Miss Bertha Renneckor, Creston, Ohio. 

2604. John Wieand, Wooster, Ohio. 

2605. Samuel Keck, Rillman, Ohio. 

2606. Florence Wieand, Wooster, Ohio. 

2607. Mary Beashore, Wooster, Ohio. 

2608. Mr. C. M. Renneckor, Creston, Ohio. 

2609. Katie Miller, Milnor, Pennsylvania. 

2610. David R. Petre, Hagerstown, Md., R. R. No. 6. 

2611. J. W. Williams, Hedgesville, W. Va. 

2612. Bertha Spaid, Concord, W. Va. 

2613. Elvie Spaid, Concord, W. Va. 

2614. E. C. Metzger, Union Bridge, Md. 

2615. Mrs. E. C. Metzger, Union Bridge, Md. 

2616. A. C. Wine, Union Bridge, Md. 

2617. R. C. Grossnickle, New Windsor, Md. 

2618. I. W. Shumaker, Savage, Pa. 

2619. L. A. Pearse, Unionville, Md. 

2620. Jno. J. John, Union Bridge, Md. 

2621. Edna Epply, Union Bridge, Md. 

2622. Sadie Reiley, 229 10th St., Washington, D. C. 

2623. Norman Vought, Elk Lick, Pa. 

2624. Nannie Miller, Newberg, Pa. 

2625. Esther V. Kreider, Carlisle, Pa., R. D. No. 4. 

2626. Sadie Cherry, Ridgely, Md. 

2627. Margaret Repp, Johnsville, Md. 

2628. Lottie Oberlin, Cordova, Md. 

2629. Edith Potts, Johnsville, Md. 

2630. Merton J. Holsinger, Pyrmont, Ind. 

2631. Oscar UUery, Prymont, Ind. 

2632. Frances M. Fisher, 623 E. Okla. Ave., O. T. 

2633. Prof. D. N. Eller, Daleville, Va. 

2634. Prof. James Frantz, Daleville, Va. 

2635. Wilson Ikenberry, Daleville, Va. 

2636. Joseph Flora, Daleville, Va. 

2637. J. H. Martin, Daleville, Va. 

2638. L. H. Coffman, Daleville, Va. 

2639. Mrs. L. H. Cofifman, Daleville, Va. 

2640. Minnie Nicar, Daleville, Va. 

2641. Cornelius Peters, Daleville, Va'. 

2642. Cora Coffman, Fincastle, Va. 

2643. Alda Hylton, Trinity, Va. 
264^4. Edith Pobst, Cloverdale, Va. 

2645. Lola Hylton, Trinity, Va. 

2646. Martha Leckrone, North Manchester, Ind. 



46 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 




iouR young; people >.||||i.. 




THE GEOGRAPHY CLASS.— Chapter X. 



IRELAND. 



Dear Mr. Maxwell: — I notice the boys wrote you a real 
nice letter the other day while I was waiting on Agnes. 
Since that we have been doing a great deal of running 
around, and the sights we have seen and the lessons we 
have learned have almost driven all the homesickness from 
Agnes and we are just getting along fine. 

One of the funniest things we have seen since we have 
been in Ireland, was what they called the " Chutes." It 
was down at the Exposition grounds and was one of the 
novel ways of getting money from the crowd. They had 
a platform built about sixty feet high, and an inclined 
plane extending from this platform down to a beautiful 
lake below. On the platform above was some machinery 
that would pull a little truck from the water, up this in- 
clined plane to the platform. Upon the truck was a nice 
little row boat. Five or six young men and women would 
pay "tuppens-hapeny" each and get in this boat, be drawn 
to the platform where they would change boats and trucks, 
and, at a given signal they would " shoot the chute; " which 
means that they would descend on the other side of the in- 
cline at a wonderful rate of speed and dash into the water 
like a king fisher. When the boat would strike the water 
it would dive three or four feet under the water. 

The sides of the boat were built so that it would throw 
the water away from them, rather than allow it to light in 
the boat. The boat would jump like a frightened steed, 
attempting to throw its rider. After two or three wicked 
jumps it would settle down on the bosom of the water and 
lose it momentum in the distance. When it had spent its 
force one of the party would pick up their oars and row 
back to the place of starting. It was the wildest fun I 
ever saw. The girls would just scream like they were be- 
ing murdered, when they were going down the chute, 
and sometimes when the boat would tip a little to one side, 
as it struck the water, they would get as wet as drowned 
rats. Oscar and Roscoe tried for half an hour to get us to 
try it, but we were fully satisfied with the experience of 
the others. 

We had a ride this afternoon in a johnny car, out to 
Blarney Castle; and we had a good time looking at the 
fine scenery and studying the history of old Ireland. I will 
not attempt a description of Blarney Castle, because you 
remember that there was a nice description of it not long 
since in the Inglenook. I believe it was some time in the 
fore part of September. After seeing that picture in the 
Inglenook, I made up my mind I would know it when I 
saw it, and sure enough I did. 

As Roscoe told you in his letter. Miss Gertrude has been 
writing an article for your paper, on Ireland, and she read 
the article to us to-day while we were resting on the top of 
Blarney Castle. We think it is good and I will enclose it 
in this letter that you may print it next week. 

If you see Raymond Tracy, Elsie Mills, or Mr Maynor, 
or any of our friends tell them we wished so much for 
• for them to-day. Pardon this short letter for we are Busy 
these days. Respectfully, 

Marie. 



BY MISS GERTRUDE MERRITT. 



Dismiss the early centuries with the thought that 
their history is mostly legend. The real history of 
Ireland begins about the ninth century, when the Danes 
invaded this land, captured the capital city, and as 
the result part of Ireland became subject to Deimiark. 

Some time after this an Irish king by the name of 
Malachy defeated the Danes and another defeat soon 
followed, under the leadership of one of the kings of 
the Munsters by the name of Brian Boru. 

About the close of the eleventh century the Danes 
reoccupied the territory. Some time during the year 
eleven hundred and seventy, the Anglo-Saxons, under 
Henry II. king of England, made a splendid feast at 
Dublin for the chiefs of the Irish. By this strategy 
he was able to form an allegiance and forced upon 
Ireland the yoke which made her, for all time to come, 
a part of the British Empire. 

The patriotic Irish were continually feeling that they 
were oppressed by foreign rule, and they desired a 
government of their own. In' 1664, an army of 
eighteen thousand infantry and cavalry attempted a 
siege of Dublin which resulted in failure. But three 
years later the renowned Oliver Cromwell, with his 
parliamentary influence, defeated the army of the Eng- 
lish king and ascended the throne of England. With 
his army of thirteen thousand he came to Dublin, 
and unto this day the poor people of Ireland point 
to the ruins of castles, churches and monasteries and 
say in all gravity, " These, have been in ruins since the 
time of Cromwell." It reminds one of the way the 
people of England find a climax for their sorrows 
by pointing back to the time when Napoleon Bonaparte 
spread dismay and ruin, throughout the cities of Eu- 
rope. 

In 1689, James II., a devout Catholic who claimed 
to be the rightful king of England, came to Ireland, 
held a parliament in Dublin, ordered nearly all the 
Protestants out of the city, erected a mint and made 
a great quantity of money from old guns, refuse met- 
al, etc., with which he attempted to pay his numerous 
debts, and compelled the people to take this spurious 
money or be hanged. A Protestant king arose in Eng- 
land, called William III. and defeated this king James 
II. He then entered Dublin in great triumph and pro- 

( CONTINUED ON PAGE 48.) 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



47 



e>V^ 



Prfie Q* ^ (3L^ X^epartment^ f 



t 



A 



\y^^ 



Why does a woman take the name of her husband 
when she is married? 

The custom which makes it proper for the wife to 
assume the name of her husband at marriage is in- 
volved in much obscurity. A recent authority advan- 
ces the opinion that it originated from a Roman custom 
and became common after the Roman occupation of 
England. Thus, Julia and Octavia, married Pompey 
and Cicero, were called by the Romans Julia of Pom- 
pey and Octavia of Cicero, and in later times the mar- 
ried women of most European countries signed their 
names in the same way, but omitted the "of." In 
spite of this theory it is a fact that as late as the six- 
teenth and the beginning of the seventeenth century 
a Catharine Parr signed her name without any change, 
though she had been married twice. We also hear 
of Lady Jane Grey, not Dudley, and Arbella Stuart, 
not Seymour. Some think that the custom originated 
with the scriptural idea that the husband and wife are 
one. This was the rule of law as far back as 1268, 
and it was decided in the case of Bon vs. Smith, in 
the reign of Elizabeth, that a woman by marriage loses 
her former name and legally receives the name of 
her husband. 

In the Geography Class serial, I notice that Marie Stew- 
art writes about the second saloon. What does that 
mean? 

On all first-class ocean steamships passengers are 
divided into first, second and third class whose accom- 
modations vary according to the price they pay for 
them. The best accommodations are for the the first- 
class passengers and cost twice as much as the second- 
class. Their rooms are called first cabin state rooms 
and their dining hall first dining saloon. The place for 
second-class passengers is called the second cabin and 
their dining room is called second saloon. We pre- 
sume that Marie referred to the fact that they were 
traveling second-class. 

♦ 

What kind of wood lasts the longest? 

Some interesting experiments have been made to 
ascertain which wood lasts the longest. It was found 
that birch and aspen decayed in three years, willow 
and chestnut in four years, maple and red beech in 
five years, and elm and ash in seven years. Oak, Scot- 
tish fir and Weymouth pine decayed to the depth of 
half an inch in seven years; larch and juniper were 
uninjured at the end of seven years. In situations 
so free from moisture that they may be practically 
called dry the durabilitv of timber is unlimited. The 



roof of Westminster hall is more than four hundred 
and fifty years old. 

* 

How is ventriloquism accomplished? 

The words uttered by the ventriloquist do not come 
from the abdomen, as was formerly believed, but are 
produced in precisely the same manner as ordinary ar- 
ticulation, the difterence in sound being caused by 
the mode of respiration. A very full inspiration is 
taken, and then the air is expired slowly through a 
narrow glottis, while the diaphragm is kept in a de- 
pressed condition, the thoracic muscles alone being 
used to empty the lungs. The ventriloquist adds in the 
deception by scarcely moving his lips ; and by directing 
the attention of the auditors to the object that is sup- 
posed to be doing the talking. 

What is the size and length of a sea lion? 

Sea lion is the name applied to several species of 
large seals of the family Otariidse. They have harsh 
hair without under-fur. The young are of reddish- 
brown color, but the mature are of a yellowish brovra. 
Two species are found in the Bay of San Francisco. 
The largest are thirteen feet long, the shortest seven 
feet, the latter is the ordinary sea lion of the menage- 
ries and zoological gardens. It is called zalophus, has 
a slender, dog-like head and emits a bark or howl. 
The bigger sea lions have a thick head and a deep 
bass growl, with a prolonged, steady roar. Other 
species are found in South America and Australian 
seas. The walrus is sometimes called a sea lion. • 

What are the names of the fins of a fish? 

Usually there are eight fins in all; the pectoral, one 
on each side just behind the head ; and a pair of ven- 
trals, immediately beneath constitute the pair 
of fins. Those named singly are, (i) the first dorsal, 
on the fore part of the spinal column. (2), the second 
dorsal . immediately following; (3) the anal just op- 
posite on the ventral surface, and (4) the caudal, 
which is commonly called the tail. Ventrals, however, 
are often missing. ^ 

What is meant by a minority president? 

A minority president is one who was elected by a 
majority of the electoral votes, but received a minority 
of the popular votes. Hayes received 250,935 fewer 
popular votes in 1876 than Qeveland in 1888, but re- 
ceived 55 more electoral votes. The term minority 
president is also applied to a chief executive whose 
party is in the minority in Congress. 



48 



THE INGLENOOK.— January lo, 1905. 



V 



* r 
t i 



i 

T 



:ivd:iscE: 



,-^:LTEO-crs"l 



»^ H ' i ' • > ' V ' t ' ' X ' ' t' t ' ' X' ' X ' ' I ' ' V t - 'V 't ' • : ■ - t ' ' X - » - i ' -v i' i- 'V ' V ' V -v t - < • ■ > >t - » » < t ' ' M -M" ? - < v i - i - <v » » » » » ■ : < » ■ : < » » ■ : ■ » » » - i ' » » ' j 



4k 

* 



IRELAND. 



(Concluded from Page 46.) 
ceeded with great ceremonies to St. Patrick's Ca- 
thedral which stands until this day. 

In the beginning of the last century the parliaments 
of England and Ireland passed the Union Act, and 
ever since the English flag has floated over the castle 
of Dublin. 

In 1803, the same year in which our dear old Ohio 
was admitted into the Union, a young barrister by the 
name of Robert Emmet headed an insurrection against 
the English government and paid the penalty of his 
rashness a short time later by death, on the scaffold in 
the streets of Dublin. The Irish all over the land, 
in many ways, perpetuate the memory of Robert Em- 
met. 

In 1867 another conspiracy against the government 
was discovered and over nine hundred arrests were 
made in a few hours. Since that time agitation upon 
agitation has troubled the hearts of the patriotic Irish 
and abuses, both real and imaginary, have been im- 
posed upon them until revolution has come near vis- 
iting them several times. And, at the present time 
England is imposing upon them annually the sup- 
port of fifty thousand troops for which they absolutely 
have no use, and which they very much detest and de- 
spise. Until a recent session of parliament, the Irish 
could not own their land, but were subjected to high 
rentals by landlords, which made it impossible for them 
to exist, were it not for sons and daughters in the free 
land of America, who are continually sending money 
to the loved ones at home. 

Our two boys, Mr. Clarke and Mr. Stewart, "by 
inquiry, have found that the purchase price of ordinary 
land is five pounds per acre, which would be twenty- 
five dollars in our money, and that the farmers actual- 
ly pay two pounds per acre annually ($10) which is 
two-fifths the purchase price. So it is easily figured 
that in two years and a half the rentals would equal 
the market value. So these poor tenants are compelled 
to pay forty per cent on the value of the land for the 
use of it. Let the American farmer, who hardly clears 
three per cent upon his investment, tell us how these 
men can make a living for their families under these 
conditions, remembering at the same time that their 
staple crops are potatoes, mangels and hay. May the 



* 

time soon corne when these honest peace-loving, in- 
dustrious people will enjoy free government of their 
own in. a land where nature has done her best. 
Dublin, Ireland. 

(To be Continued.) 

♦ * * 

MODERN HONEYMOON EPITAPH. 



A little miss. 
A little kiss. 
A little bliss. 
A wedding that is splendid. 

A little jaw. 
A little law. 
Back home to maw. 
And lo! the trouble's ended. 

—Elgin H. S. Mirror. 

■ . -^ ♦ ♦ 

SIX TO ONE. 



A WELL-KNOWN English surgeon was imparting 
some clinical instructions to half a dozen students. 
Pausing at the bedside of a doubtful case, he said: 
" Now, gentlemen, do you think this is or is not a case 
for operation?" One by one the students made 
their diagnosis, and all qf them answered in the nega- 
tive. " Well, gentlemen, you are all wrong, " said the 
wielder of the scalpel, " and I shall operate to-morrow." 
" No, you won't, " said the patient, as he rose in his 
bed, " six to one is a good majority ; gimme my 
clothes." — Med. Age. 

♦> ♦ <♦ 

HOW TO MAKE SCANDAL. 



"Take a grain of falsehood, a handful of runabout, 
the same quantity of nimble tongue, a sprig of herb 
backbite, a teaspoonful of don't you tell it, six drops of 
malice, and a few of envy. Add a little discontent and 
jealousy, and strain through a bag of misconstruction; . 
cork it up tight in a bottle of malevolence and hand it 
out on a skein of street yarn ; keep in a hot atmosphere ; 
shake it occasionally for a few days and it will be fit for 
use. Let a few drops be taken before walking out and 
the desired result will follow. 

* * * 



That man greatly lives, 
Whate'er his fate or fame, 
Who greatly dies. 



-Young. 



Good Land Cheap 




Let us sell you farming land where the soil is pro- 
ductive and the crops dependable ; where we have no 
drouths or failures; where grasshoppers are not; where 
we have few storms and no destructive winds; where 
products are greatly diversified; where the markets are 
as good as they are easily reached; where the climate 
is uniform and salubrious; where you will be cordially 
welcomed and helped along. We state without fear of 
contradiction that we have the best land at the least 
money, possessing more advantages and fewer draw- 
backs, than can be found in this country to-day. A few 
years' time is all that is necessary to prove that we are 
in one of the most productive areas for fruit, root crops 
and live stock. The possibilities are here, largely un- 
developed as yet; all that we want is the people. Those 
we are getting are the right kind, your own kind, and 
the country will soon be dotted with green fields and 
cosy homes. Don't get the idea that you are going to a 
wilderness; not at all; on the contrary, we have sold 
lands in our BRETHREN COLONY to oven 120 fam- 
ilies, nearly half of whom are already on the ground, 
others coming next spring. In the vicinity of BRETHREN, MICHIGAN, we have 
thousands of acres of productive soil, splendidly adapted for fruit, root and vegetable 
crops and live stock, at prices from $7 per acre upwards, on easy terms. Our lands are 
sold to actual settlers. 

BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, BRETHREN, MICH., 

is Resident Agent in charge of the work at our Brethren Colony. It will only cost you a 
postal card to drop him a line for our illustrated booklet, entitled " The Brethren Colony 
in the Pruit Belt of Michigan." This will give you an accurate idea of the lands and all 
conditions surrounding them The booklet contains letters giving the opinion of many 
Brethren in regard to our lands and work. Every statement can be borne out by facts. 

Reduced rates will be furnished homeseekers desiring to look our country over and 
every opportunity will be accorded them to conduct their investigations satisfactorily 
by Bro. Miller on their arrival at Brethren, Michigan. 

For booklet, information as to rates and all details address: 



The basis of my business is absolute aad 
unvarying integrity. 

SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Founder of tlie Brethren Colony, Brethren, Mich, 



or 



SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Cadillac, Mich., 

DISTRICT AQENT 



BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, 
Brethren, Mich., 

RESIDENT AQENT 
lSS OGla.tlOZ3.. 



MATTHEW HENRY 

COMMENTARY ON THE BIBLE 



df»h.ioe: <3-n.E!ja.Trij-5r xi.de3x>tto£3i>. 



Catalogue 
Price, 

$15.00 




Our Special Price 

f. o. b. Elgin, 

Only $7.95 



It is surprising that, in this labor-saving and time-saving age, the ^ver popular Matthew Henry's Commen- 
tary has not before been issued in convenient volumes. Two features of this new edition call for special attention: 
First, the moderate size of the volumes; second, the large size of the type (larger than any previous edition). Oth- 
er features are the excellent printing and substantial binding. 

" Biblical students who are most familiar vvith the very best commentaries of this generation are most able to ap- 
preciate the unfading freshness, the clear analysis, the spiritual force, the quaint humor, and the evangelical richness 
of Matthevy Henry's Exposition of the Old and Nevir Testaments. Ever since we have been engaged in the minis- 
try we have found our appreciation of this work increasing with our years." — The N. Y. Observer. 

f 

" There is nothing to be compared with old Matthew Henry's Commentary for pungent and practical applica- 
tions of the teachings of the text." — The S. S. Times. 

We have now reduced the price of this commentary until it is within reach of all. Every minister and Bible 
student who does not already have a set of these books ought to take advantage of this special offer. You cannot 
afford to let this offer pass without due consideration. Better send your order at once. Price, only $7.95. 



Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, Illinois. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



$^■95 




for ihis large 
handsome 
stool range 

ithoM* iiigh closet or reservoir. With 

la.^e, high, roomy, warminsr closet and 

reservoir, jtist as shown Id cut, SI l>OSi 

Reaervoir Is porcelain on ioslde, asbestus 

covered on ouUiJe, Heivy cost top with 6 

full si/e cooking holes. Larperoumy oven. 

ek'i'U-ir&-18sirc. <\Vc have Dstylcs of steel 

od cast ranges wlthmiiCliIarRcrandsmAll- 

er ovcDs, al^ci to suit all.) 

Th» body is m.^de of cold 

rolled steel, top aod all cast- 

ffs of best pit: Iron. Grate) 



$ 



2-95 



1.95 ^aV'" 
Hoatop 



lust as Illustrated. Burns 
hArd or soft coal or wood. 
Has drawn ceater g^te., 
corrugated firo pot, cold 
rolleti sheet steel body. 
licAvy cast base, larfie cast 
fecJ door, ash pit door and 
ash p.in, swing top, screw 
drafl-rcirulator. Polished 
urn. nickel top rfn^, naioe 
plate, foot rails, etc. 

Wo have hcRtlne 
stoveg of every Idod. 
Hot blast, air tiehts, the 
kind ihatretalls for 13.00, 
for 80o* Base burners 
at J4 the regular price 




iwe use! mprovcd duplex grate, , 
Ibums wood or coal. NIokel 
' band oa froDt ol mala top; 
brackets and tea shelves on 
t; band andotnamentoo reservoir; 
^ door. etc. Are highly polished.ii 
making the range an ornamrnt to any home. 
Aim TFnUC^ are (he moBf liberal 
lllllf I rKHIX «vermade. Wewlllshlpyou 
Wwll I ■■lllllW any range orstove.Quaranlae^ 

^ it to be perfect In construction and material and we guarantee It to^ 

reach you ioperfect condition. You can pay for it ^er you receive it. Veuomfaka II 
Into your own home and use tl 30 full davs. If you do not find It to be exactly as represented and perfectly satisfactory 
In every way. and the bipgest bargainln astovcyou ever sow orheardof and equal to stoves that retail for double our price, 
ynu can return it to us and we will payfrdghC both ways, so you won't beoutone single cent, 

PUT TIIIC **An" ftllT andsendlttousaod wowfll mailyouourfreeStoveCatalog. It explains ourterms fully, 
WU I I niO H19 UU I tells you how to order. Don*t buy a stove ef any kind until you aeloopnawlarae 
8lo«o Catalogue for 1004 and IB06 and see our 
likcrai terms and the lowest ortces over made. 

EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY CO., Chicago, III. 

20,000 INQUIRIES 

Would come pouring through our mail this week if 
all the Brethren understood just what we have. 



AN HONEST, EFFICIENT, ECONOMICAL LIGHTING 
SYSTEM FOR EVERY COUNTRY HOME. ' 



Acetylene Gas makes a beautiful, bright, white light. 
Machine simple and safe and fully guaranteed. 

Do You Want to Know More? 

ECONOMIC LIGHTING CO.. - Royersford. Pa. 



44tl3 



Mention the INGL"-NOOK when writing. 




ornia 

Oregon aijj^ 

Washini^ton 

Fast Through Trains Daily 

over the only double-track railway between Chicago and 
the lV\issouri River. Direct route and excellent train ser^ 
ce. Two trains a day to 

San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland 

Through service of Pullman compartment, drawing-room and 

tourists sleeping cars, dining cars, library and observation 

cars, buffet smoking cars and free reclining chair cars. 

Daily and Personality Conducted Excursions 4 

For tickets and information apply to agents of 

The North=Western Liae 






THE 

REEDLEY 
TRACT 



_„ I 



The Gem of the San 
Joaquin Valley 



Embraces the Mount Campbell, 
Columbia, Carmelita, Springfield, 
Producers, Level Orchard, Kings 
River and other Colonies. These 
are among the best lands in the 
State for all kinds of fruit and 
alfalfa. Good soil, low prices, 
abundant water, healthful climate, 
perfect natural drainage. 

Special inducements made to 
Brethren. Colony now fonning. 
Write for booklet, and full informa- 
tion. Address, 

O. D. LYON, 

Reedley, Fresno Co., California. 




Via Dubuque, Waterloo and Albert Lea. 
Fast Vestibule Night train with through 
Sleeping Car, Buffet-Library Car and Free 
Reclining Chair Car. Dining Car Service 
en route. Tickets of agents of I. C. R. R. 
and connecting lines. 



A. H. HANSON. C. P. A., CHICAGO. 



Jl. 



IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
PLEASE MENTION THE INGLE- 
NOOK. 



THE INGLENOOK, 



f . 1 . . 1 . . { . . !■ ■!■ n , , x . ■ ! ■ I t . . M ' ' : ■ < ■ > i ' i - ■ : ■ » » » » ■ ? ■ » ■ : ■ t - t » - t - t - t » » - i - » » » » * ' t - » ■ : ■ « . m -^^.^^^hh-^^^ 




K< 't- >!• -X' ■?■ 't' 't- -t' > t ' - t ' - t ' ■ : ■ i - ' I - » - t i - » ' t ' - t ' - t * ■ H >< ' - t » <' •!■ 't » -HhM^ 



Now is the time to renew your subscription for the INGLENOOK. If 
you have not already done so, hand your subscription to one of our regular 
appointed agents. If it is not convenient for you to do this send your sub- 
scription direct to us. 

The INGLENOOK for the coming year promises to be the best of its 
history. 

We have several very interesting serials promised written by authors 
of more than ordinary ability. As the Inglenook family already know, Bro. 
D. L. Miller will write a series of articles on " Kodak and Pencil South of 
the Equator." This is a territory which our periodicals have never had the 
privilege of presenting to the public and the articles will be intensely inter- 
esting since they are to be copiously illustrated from Brother Miller's own 
camera. Essays will be solicited during the year that will deal directly with 
the interests of the young and rising generation. The editorial department 
will be aimed directly at the issues of the day without any disposition what- 
ever to dodge them. Our current news department will be prepared with 
the busy man in view, knowing that his time is valuable, and assist him very 
much in keeping him in touch with current events. Since the wants and needs 
of the home are more or less neglected a strong effort will be made to make 
the Home Department a useful medium. The Christian Workers' and Reading 
Circle Topics will take the place of Nature Study as a result of a popular vote 
of the Nook family. The Q & A Department of course will be what you 
make it. 



New Names 



We have added almost 2,000 new names to our list in the last few months. 
Many new ones are now being added daily. We are pleased to be able to 
report so favorably. We believe further that merit is the only sure foundation 
on which to build, and we attribute to this the wonderful growth of the Ingle- 
nook these last few months. 

The features that have made so many new friends for us ought to keep 
all old ones. We do not believe that there is one of our old subscribers that 
will want to do without the Inglenook the coming year. We are sure we 
would dislike very much to lose one of our readers. We intend to make the 
paper so interesting and instructive the coming year that you cannot afford 
to be without it. 

The Farmers Voice 

The Farmers Voice is a first class firm paper now being published at 
this office. It is one of the best papers of its kind published. The subscrip- 
tion price is 60 cents per year. In order to accommodate our many farmer 
friends we have made special arrangements with the publishers, so that we 
can furnish the paper to you the coming year for only 25 cents. That is, 
send us $1.25 and we will renew your Inglenook for another year and send 
you the Farmers Voice for one year. We promise you that tlie Voice will 
not be sent you longer than the year, unless you renew. This is an excellent 
opportunity to secure a good farm journal at a small cost. 



Be sure and don't forget to renew for the NOOK, 
scription NOW. 



Send on your sub- 



Brethren Publishing House, 




CUT THIS OUT 

Of every Nook for 
six months, send 
us the 26 LION 
HEADS and we 

will send you any 
one of our sixteen 
"HOME TREATMEHT" 
Remedies FREE. 
Send for descriptive list and make your 
selection. Live agents wanted. Profit- 
able business. 

RHEUMATISM CURED 

Our latest and finest remedy for 
Rheumatism, Sciatica, Gout, Stiff and 
Painful Joints, etc., is TONGA Tablets, 
which removes the uric acid from the 
blood and cures Rheumatism perma- 
nently. A trial box only 50 cents. 

VICTOR MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, 



S. F. Sanger, Secy. 



SOUTH BEND, IND. 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS. 



The HOME GEM WASHER 

AGENTS can make from 
$600.00 to $1,000.00 in 
one year selling this ma- 
chine. Special introductory 
price where I have no agent. 
Address, Wm. S. Miller, 
Meyersdale, Pa. 

52tl3Menltrtn thp p-'r,i,KNnnK whpn wntms- 




E. C. WARD. 



HARRY W. JOHNSON. 



HOMES IN SUNNY AND RAINY CALIFORNIA 
WARD & JOHNSON, 

RACKERBY, CALIFORN A, 

Within Bounds of the Bangor Church. 

2tl3 Mention the INfiLENOQg when writing 



Our New 

Book and Bible 
catalogue 

Is Yours for the 
Asking 

Brethren Publishing Hsnse 

Elgin, Illinois. 



THE INGLEINOOK. 






ma^ 



fV^^I ■■ -rf :-r^^ 




p 



DOUBLE UMPKIN 
DOUBLE I 
DOUBLE UMPKIN 
UMPKIN PIE 



WHY NOT COME TO THE 

LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 

FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 

Where Pumpkins, Corn and common crops grow, as well as every kind 
of California fruit? 

Come and visit the Brethren who are living here and see what they have 
done in the past two years. 

Nearly 600 sales made since we put this land on the market and over 2,000 
people now living on the grant where there were but about sixty a little over 
five years ago. 

This does not look like a temporary boom, does it? Must be something 
solid behind all this. If not, five years ought to show up the weakness, but 
instead of weakening the Laguna and its various interests are growing stronger 
all the time. 

If you are thinking of coming to California to make a hptne you cannot 
afford to overlook this place. 

We still have plenty of good land with abundant water for irrigation. 
The price is from $30.00 to $60.00 per acre, terms, one-fourth cash, balance 
in eight annual payments. 

COLONISTS' RATES 

will again be in force March 1 to IS, 1905. 

From Chicago to Laton, $33.00 

From Mississippi River to Laton, $30.00 

From Missouri River to Laton, $25.00 

Make your plans to start for California March 1st and you will be in time 
to buy land and put in a crop. 

Write us for free printed matter and local newspaper. Address 

NARES & SAUNDERS, ■ Laton, California. 

33tl3 Mention the INGLEIfOOE wben vrltuis 



C A N O E R 

Cured wlthont 
Surgary or 
Pain. 
Our latot 
book which 
,wc will send 
free of ekwft 
tells (llabcui 
Cancer and 
all chronic 
and malig- 
nant 'liseas- 
es , and how 
they can be 
cured at home quickly and at small ex- 
pense, reference, patients cured in every 
Slate and Territory, ministers & bankers 

AiMreM, Dre.Sinebirt & Co., lock Boi3, Eoloiu, hi 





Job Printing 

The Kind that Brings Re- 
sults, the Kind you needn't 
be ashamed of, the Kind 
that is Cheapest in the End 
because Just as You Want 
it, — Furnished by 

BBSTHBEN ■BVBlMTSHXttd H01TSB, 
Elgin, Illinois. 

The Inglenook 
COOK BOOK 



We have sent out thousands of 
these Cook Books as premiums. 
So great was the demand that a 
second edition was published. 
We are still receiving numerous 
calls for this Cook Book. For this 
reason we have decided to dispose 
of the few remaining copies at 
25 cents per copy. To insure a 
copy it will be necessary for you 
to order at once. . . Send to 

BBETHSEH FUBIiISHZlTa HOUSE. 
■Elgin, niinolB. 

In Answering Advertisements plea se 
mention the Inglenoolc. 



Ready for the New Year 

Just the thing for the Christian Worl^ers, 
Reading Circle and Sunday School Work 



t • 






^iiClenHok: 



',; Has returned to the orig'inal idea of Annual Conference. It has TWO 

w FULL PAGES, edited by Elizabeth D. Rosenberger, replete with an 

'A exposition which will be exceedingly interesting to all CHRISTIAN WORK- 

',", BRS on account of its completeness and convenience. 

4 *■ 
f * 



Special Reduced Prices to Sunday Schools 
... and Christian Workers' Societies . . . 

In clubs of five or more, the papers all being sent to one address, we will 
furnish the INGLBNOOK for 20 cents per copy per quarter. 

A large number of schools are already using the INGLBNOOK for the ad- 
vanced scholars. Here is an opportunity to introduce the INGLBNOOK in your 
school or Christian Workers' meeting. Nothing better could be secured for the 
young people. Address, 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 




llCbENOOK. 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 



/ 









PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



POEM. 

THE STEPS THAT COUNT.— By A Lyrical Liner. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

TUSKEGEE SKILL HELPS GERMAN GOVERNMENT 

IN AFRICA.— By Roscoe Conkling Bruce. 
TAKEN UNAWARES.— By Mary I. Senseman. 
SOME FAMOUS WOMEN.— By Olive Miller. 
THE BLIND CAT.— By Maude 'Hawkins. 
MT. VERNON, VIRGINIA.— By Anna Bowman. 
AWAY DOWN SOUTH.— By A. G. Crosswhite. 
THE MOUNTAIN LION.— By S. Z. Sharp. 
FASCINATION.— By Harvey H. Saylor. 
SUNYA AND TILLIE.— By S. N. McCann. 
THE SIMPLE LIFE.— By D. Z. Angle. 
A' LETTER.— By Lottie Bollinger. 

EDITORIALS. 

A TWENTIETH CENTURY REFORMER. 
VERSATILITY. 



m 






ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



anuary 1 7, 1 905 



$ I .OO per Year 



Number 3, Volume VII 



the: rNGLENOOK. 



30,000 ACRES 



IRRIGATED 



Government Land 

In Nevada 

NOW OPEN FOR 

HO MESTE AD 

UNDER THE NEW 

IRRIGATION LAW 

The United States Qovern- 
ment Constructs the Canals, 
Reservoirs and Lateral Ditch- 
es to the Land, and Maintains 
them for lo Year* at a cost of 

ONLY $2.50 AN ACRE 

rSM TEAS. 

TWa Includes Water. After lo Years Water 
and Canals Belong to Homesteader. 



ONE=WAY COLONIST'S RATES 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, Match 
I to May 15. 

From Chicago, S33 00 

From St. Louis, 3° 0= 

From Missouri River 25 00 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 



Stop Off at Reno, Nevada, 

And investigate' the irrigated Govern- 
ment land. Call on Mr. H.B. Maxson, 
U. S. Engineer, for information. 



Printed Hatter FREE. Write to 

GEO. L. McDONAUQH, 

COLONIZATION AGENT 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Omaha, Neb. 



...THE... 

Union Pacific Railroad 

In Connection With 

San Pdro, Los Angeles & Salt 
Lake Railroad 

EXPECT TO BE RUNNING 
THROUGH TRAINS BETWEEN 
CHICAGO AND LOS ANGELES 
VIA SALT LAKE CITY EARLY 
NEXT SPRING. 



ONE-WAY COLONIST'S RATES 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, March 
I to May 15. 

From Chicago S33 00 

From St. Louis, 30 00 

From Missouri Ri\ er 25 00 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 

There are opportunities in Southern 
Utah and Nevada where homes can 
be had at little expense, where no 
heavy clothing and but little fuel is 
needed, where garden truck can be 
raised in abundance nearly the whole 
year, and where the people can live 
in tents throughout the year without 
sufifering from heat or cold. The new 
line of the Salt Lake Route, now 
building through to California, will 
pass through several well watered 
valleys in these states, in which can 
be grown apples, grain, potatoes, figs, 
cotton, sugar cane, tobacco, peanuts 
and rhany of the semi-tropical fruits. 
These valleys are surrounded by hills 
and lofty snow-capped mountains, 
which furnish an inspiring back- 
ground to the scene which greets 
the traveler who finds his way into 
the favored region. The climate is 
mild and delightful, and excessive 
heat and extreme cold is unknown. 
This is a good place for a poor man 
to, get a home, the sick to find health 
and the capitalist to make good in- 
vestments. 

If you are interested in mining, 
manufacturing or agriculture, or seek- 
ing a new home in a new land, and 
desire to know more about the great 
resources of Utah, Nevada and Cali- 
fornia, write to Geo. L. McDonaugh, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Neb. 

And then stop off at CALIENTE.S 
and LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, to in- 
vestigate for yourself. Be sure to buy 
your ticket over 

The Union Pacific Railroad 

known as the "OVERLAND ROUTE," 
and is the only direct line from 
Chicago and the Missouri River to 
all principal points West. Business 
men and others can save many 
hours via this line. 

E. L. LOMAX. G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



Join Excursion 

(To Sterling, Colorado,) 



South 



Platte 
Valley 

AND RETURN 

First and Third Tuesday 
Each Month 

Where the Contract has been 
Let for a 

$750,000.00 BEET SUGAR 
FACTORY 

To be Erected on Land Adjoining City 

of Sterling, Bought from Mr. David 

Plum, of Maryland, Illinois. 



Only 24 hours' run to Chicago; only 
12 hours' run to the Missouri River; 
only 4 hours' run to Denver. The on- 
ly country that can make a good 
showing to the homeseeker in mid- 
winter. Go and see for yourself — it 
need only take four or five days' time 
and you will be well repaid by what 
you see. Buy your ticket over 

The Union Pacific 
Railroad 

Which is known as " The Over- 
land Route," and is the only direct 
line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West. 
Business men and others can save 
many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal to your nearest ticket 
agent, or GEO. L. McDONAUGH, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Nebr. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebr. 



» 



^:^^^^r;i^%^;.'^-^^s^3^ 



«i^'>. ^E 



•'.->. 



MATTHEW HENRY 



COMMENTARY ON THE BIBLE 



T»DEi.iOE3 odfilze: a-t^XjiTT dfi.e;i>xjo:e;i>. 



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I 




MEN OF LEARNING, 

Leaders of nations, in fact all sorts 
and conditions of men bear ^vit- 
ness that, unless a man is ^ phy- 
sically strong, his mental capacity 
is more or less diminished. 

To be strong, quick and alert 
mentally means that you must be 
possessed of good health--the two 
conditions go hand in hand. To be 
at our best, we must see that our blood, the life 
stream, is pure and vigorous. It is not an arduous 
or difficult task. All that is needed is an occa- 
sional "purifying process" by means of a reliable 
herb remedy, such as DR PETER'S BLOOD VI- 
TALIZER. 

A JUDGE WRITES. 

Berlin, Mo., October 15, 1903. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicag-o, 111. 

Dear Sir: — Inasmuch as the past season has been an extremely 

healthy one, I have not had as large a sale on the BIyOOD 

VITALIZER as previously. It has been successful in all cases 

where it has been used. I have not used anything else in my 

family for over ten years except the BLOOD VITALIZER. It 

is the best medicine we have ever found, and never expect to be 

without it as long as it is possible to get it. 

Yours very respectfully, 

J. H. CAMPBELL, Ex-Judge County Court. 



DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER holds an unbroken record 
of success, extending back over 100 years, as a blood purifier and 
health builder. It is not for sale in drug stores, but is supplied to 
the people direct through special agents appointed in every com- 
munity. Address, 

DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 



112-114 South Hoyne Ave. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



XHE INQLENOOK. 



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diseases will be sent a 30 days Treat- 
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for 30 days, and if you can truthfully 
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use of BRAWNTAWNS , your mon- 
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I Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



I" rv A I_V /^ is the best-watered arid State in America. Brethren are moving there because hot 
IUa^I 1 V-/ winds, destructive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- 
mate it makes life bright and worth living. 
We have great faith in what Idaho has to oflfer to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a 
change for the general improvement in your cojidition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on 
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swer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad 
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Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see 
for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. 



100,000 Acres Now Open for Settlement at 
Twin Falls, Idaho, under the Carey Act. 

Unlimited supply of water for irrigation and for power. A grand opportunity for the Home- 
seeker who locates on these lands. 10 years time given for payment for land and water after lands 
are sold. The canals and water belong to the settlers who will own and control the same. 



if Homeseekers' Roand=Trip Excarsion Tickets 

•^ will be sold to points in Idaho on the first and third Tuesday of February, March and April, 1905. 

^ The rate will apply from Missouri river points and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloomington, Peoria and 

■^ St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific from stations on their line 

^ in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip, plus $2.00, with 

i5 limit of 15 • days going. Return passage may commence any day within final limit of 21 days from 

!^ date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting point. 

ia COLONISTS' ONE WAY SECOND CLASS tickets will be sold to above points from March 

■ ^ first to May 15th inclusive. 

5 Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. Fine 
!^ Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 



;^ Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 

^ Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 

55 to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sovvm in February 

fi or March the yield would have been much larger. 

^ Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 

?5 oats. 

^5 Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 

^ the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) EL L. Dotson. 

5 D. E. HURLEY, 

■^ S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

;^ J. K HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. Salt Lake City, Utah. 

^^ Uejttion the INGLEKOOK when wntlDi. 40tl3 




Vol. VII. 



January 17, 1905. 



No 3. 



THE STEPS THAT COUNT. 



SNAPSHOTS. 



L 



Lyrical Liner. 

There's a wondrous sight o' hills to climb as we'uns 
trudge along, 
And it does seem like the way is rather rough; 
We become almost too weary, sometimes, for a smile or 
song, 
And conclude this world, on us, is pretty tough. 
But there's one thing sure about it, if there were no hills 
at all. 
In life's journey, we could never climb up higher; 
And it does seem mighty nice that, to the aim above us all, 
Ev'ry upward step will always bring us nigher. 

Yes, these blessed hills were meant to lift us higher as 
we go, 
While our foolish dread is tuggin' so at them, 
Climbin' hills before we come to them, as some one's 
said, although 
'Tis a folly which we, in ourselves, condemn. 
I feel sorry for the weary tramp, from door to door, 
that asks 
Wherewith, still, to take him through to nowhere, then, 
But the laborin' man, with health an' heart a-plyin' duty's 
tasks, 
With the step that counts, a man among true men. 

I cannot feel bad for him, for he is gettin' all the good 

Out o' effort, there is in it, while the man, 
Trampin', takes the steps but gets there not a whit more 
than if he stood 
Like a stump in some great field, for lack o' plan: — ■ 
For as many steps count minus, trampin' aimless like, as 
plus. 
Full as many, but they're taken just the same, 
If a bee line once were taken for the highest int'rests, 
thus. 
Much I doubt if we as many steps could name. 

Then why not, since trampin' any how, just put our steps 
in line. 
And take aim for sumthin' worth 'em at last, 
There are many precious objects, if our efforts we'll com- 
bine 
To the reachin' of them, worth the task when past; 
We're a-steppin' off our o^vn land, — yes a measurin' our 
own gain, 
And it's worth our while to view it in this way, 
For our steps will grow much lighter, and we'll step 
with " might and main," 
Seein' all we step off's ours, for it will pay. 



Never step over one duty to perform another. 

♦ 
You must hunt opportunities — they luon't hunt you. 

* 
The devil never likes to he told that he is a devil. 

♦ 
There is as much to learn about spending money 
as in making it. 

A good way to secure Itappiness for yourself is to 
make others liappy. 

♦ 
No m-an prays earnestly who does not work with 
fully Of much earnestness. 

* 

A'o man can do one thing through a desire to please 
God zdthout zvanting to do another. 

* 
No man ever amounts to much zvho hasn't got con- 
fidence enough in himself to ma-ke an effort. 

* 
The man who does his prayerful best is a man of 
great power, no matter how humble his sphere may be. 

* 
Sweetness that never sours will do more to smooth 
your pathway through this vale of tears than consid- 
erable money. 

* 

When you, are not sure that you can be a success- 
fid worker, determine that z&ith God's help you will 
be a faithful one. 

// every man in the country luould strictly prohibit 
himself from drinking, there zvoidd be no need of a 
prohibition party. 

* 

The time is at hand zuhen we realise thai " leaves 
have their time to fall," and zve realize also, as the 
necessity for heavier clothes is made apparent, 
that the fall has its time to leave, and that the chilling 
blasts of zvinter are here. 



i if^ 8 



5° 



THE IN GLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



TUSKEGEE SKILL HELPS GERMAN GOVERN- 
MENT IN AFRICA. 



BY EOSCOE CONKLING BRUCE. 



A NOTABLY interesting letter has just been received 
by Booker T. Washington from John W. Robinson, 
one of his former students, who is now in charge of 
the experimental cotton raising under the auspices of 
the German Government at Muatya, Lome, Togo, West 
Africa. Responsive to certain far sighted commercial 
interests, the German Government is determined to 
discover whether cotton can be successfully raised on a 
large scale in Africa ; and, finding the difficulties many 
and various, asked Principal Washington to send some 
cotton experts from Tuskegee. This he did, placing 
the expedition in charge of Professor James N. Cal- 
loway. In Calloway's report for 1 900-1, he outlined 
a policy which has been severely tested and proved 
sound; and, since his return to resume his duties at 
Tuskegee, the work, now under the charge of Robin- 
son, has followed the principles and to some extent 
even the details of Calloway's report. 

" In my letter to you," says Robinson to Principal 
Washington, " I shall deal with the subjunctive ' if ' 
and the co-ordinate ' and.' Generally speaking I 
am unable to see many impossibilities in the doings of 
men. Of course there are conditions to be righted 
and obstacles to be overcome. So, after one year's 
experience with our undertaking here, I felt convinced 
that it was possible for us to accomplish our purpose; 
so we set to work to extirpate the ' ifs ' root and 
branch." 

" If " Number One. 

The first essential to success in the work was to 
win over the natives to hearty sympathy with the un- 
dertaking. Such an enterprise can only be counted 
successful to the degree that it is supported, developed 
and sustained by the people. It was plain that " if " 
Robinson and his men could succeed in interesting the 
people generally so that they would feel that the in- 
dustry is pre-eminently of the people, for the people, 
and by the people, the first " if " would evaporate. 

But, at the outset it was very difficult to arouse any 
popular interest: illumined by costly experience, the 
natives distrust every proposition made them by a 
foreigner, and in the beginning would not even accept 
gifts of cotton seed. These untraveled black men 
feared the Greeks even bearing gifts. They argued 
that should they accept the seed, the foreigners would 
come again and claim their own with cruel usury. 
Certain Europeans, initiated into the mysteries of na- 
tive psychology, confidently predicted that the natives 
would never become interested in the movement and 



that on this rock the enterprise would founder. " But," 
says Robinson, " we work,ed on and already the farm- 
ing districts are dotted with hundreds of native cotton 
farms. Now, they no longer mistrust us but come and 
eagerly ask for cotton seed. A conservative estimate 
places the incoming native harvest at the 1000 bale 
mark." 

Of course the native methods are antediluvian and 
grotesque, and they cultivate cotton exclusively as 
a secondary crop. But, the foreigners are contented, 
at the outset, to let them follow if they must, their 
own lights; the process will advance from the known 
to the related unknown, from shortsighted habits to 
improved methods. The new must, as in all other 
teaching, be grafted upon the old. Thus, the days 
of " if " number one are jiumbered. 

"If" Number Two. 

" If " the Robinson party could succeed in stimulat- 
ing the people to take up the culture of cotton heartily 
and seriously, and then offer them a cotton plant that 
would pay them well for cultivating it, the experiment 
would have transcended the experimental stage. To 
extirpate this second " if " proved especially arduous ; 
it required more than mere earnestness in general 
procedure. It required an amount of technical knowl- 
edge that could be distilled only from experience; it 
required a period of years to put that dearly acquired 
experience into successful practice. 

" We find distributed through the colony," writes 
Robinson, " not less than three distinct species of Gos- 
sypium (cotton), with some hybrids and varieties 
but none of these are indigenous and having been 
left in a neglected state for centuries, are not far re- 
moved from the wilderness of nature, and, even when 
put under the best culture, are not particularly prof- 
itable. 

" The seeds irriported from America are not able to 
survive the vastly changed climatic conditions. Here 
is our greatest obstacle. Our course was plain; if 
we did not have a plant that exactly suited us, why, 
we had to make it — that's all! And that is the prin- 
cipal cause of my remaining in Africa so continuously 
and so long." 

To an American cotton planter it would, perhaps, 
not seem impracticable to manufacture an appropriate 
soil ; but, in Togo, West Africa, there was no decently 
behaved climate, and he would probably defy any 
man to manufacture climate. But, in effect, that is 
what Calloway and Robinson have been attempting — 
to make a climate to please their plants. Or, more 
exactly they have been trying not to construct a climate 
but a cotton plant neatly adjusted to the Togo climate. 
The production of a commercial plant is certainly 
more important than difficult. Through cross-breed- 



THE INGLENOUK.— January 17, 1905. 



51 



ing and selection with close, and infinite care over and 
over again, Robinson is now obtaining results that 
are auspicious. 

" Our present Togo seeds," says he, " yield about 
400 pounds to the acre and the character of the fruit 
and the arrangement of the stalk made it very expen- 
sive to harvest. Besides, the stalk strives to imitate 
a tree and, proportionately to its size, is not prolific ; 
moreover the lint is not good. But, this cotton is the 
peer of American middling. We are attempting to de- 
velop a plant that will yield 1,000 pounds seed cotton 
to the acre, with a lint equal in quality to fully good 
■middling or to Allen's 1% inch staple." 

There will be in cultivation this year some 4000 acres 
which, according to the present yield, will produce 
1,600,000 pounds seed cotton or a little less than 1,000 
bales, but thfe same area, if planted to a more prolific 
plant, would produce not less than 2,000 bales ; and, if 
the lint brings 22 per cent more in the market one 
can see how greatly the incomes of the colony would 
be augmented. Such a plant is forthcoming. 

Through selection and crossing of Gossypium Hirt- 
sutiumvar, Russel Big Boll, and Gossypium Redigos- 
sim, a new variety has been educed which is satis- 
factory in every essential respect. More hardy than 
the average American plants, and is 50 per cent more 
productive than the average native plants. A sample 
of the lint from this new variety was submitted to 
the Chamber of Commerce in Berlin and pronounced 
good in every way, and in January, 1904, was able 
, to command about 20 cents a pound. Thus, " if " 
number two is about to take wings. 

Other "Ifs." 

There are other minor " ifs " that are receiving 
similar attention: as far as Muatya Lome, Togo, is 
concerned, the whole race of "ufs " will soon be extinct 
as the dodo! 

Principal Washington admonishes every one of his 
students to labor earnestly, quietly, soberly, discharging 
his duties in a way that will eventually make him 
influential in his community. " Being faithful in small 
things," says Robinson, " is one of the principles of 
Tuskegee. It has become natural for me to be faith- 
ful, it matters not how insignificant the service. But, 
one may be faithful in a capacity which, strictly speak- 
ing, is not his duty. Living up to this principal of 
faithfulness, I find myself to-day possessing much 
influence in the work in which I am now engaged. 

" In order to make secure the work begun and to 
insure a normal and well balanced progress for the 
future, it was recommended to institute along with the 
present undertakings what I am pleased to call our 
Cotton School and Plant Breeding Station. At this 
school are gathered young men from all over the colony 



who come for a two years' course in modern methods 
of farming. These boys, forty-five in number, repre- 
sent the most substantial and progressive classes. The 
land used for this purpose is 250 acres in extent. Such 
an institution seemed to me necessary to the wholesome 
progress of the undertaking." 

At the beginning some skeptics did not believe in 
the wisdom of the cotton expedition, but now interest 
and enthusiasm are running high. There will soon 
be in operation three ginning and pressing stations, 
run by steam power and many others including a dozen 
or more hand gins. 

John W. Robinson is the quality of man Tuskegee 

educates and trains honest, plucky, patient, resourceful, 

alert, industrious, with a passion for serving other 

people. 

Tuskegee, Ala. 

4. ^ 4> 

TAKEN UNAWARES. 



BY MARY I. SENSEMAN. 



I 



There are few people who have not done the wrong 
thing at the wrong time, and knew it afterwards. And 
the few who did not wish, when they knew, that they 
had done the right thing, need a great deal of pity. 

We laugh, when a smile would do; or smile, when 
a placid countenance is in order. We have our mind 
filled with something else and do not hear a question 
or remark at our side, or stare, or simper, or scold, or 
interrupt a person speaking. 

It was involuntary. Afterwards we knew it was an 
insignia of ill-breeding. The thing that prompted our 
action came unexpectedly. We cannot foresee that 
somebody will be awkward, and then we are awkward 
to notice it. 

The key to correcting the foolish actions is " think." 
Bind that key on the nerve cells that control reflex 
action. Teach them to ask advice of the brain instead 
or sending haphazard orders. We shall have to get 
ourselves into the habit of slipping into the other fel- 
low's place in order to act towards him with best good 
efifect. 

To think, we have to be thinking. Be thinking of 
the work at hand, of the person or company in whose 
presence we are. The result will be that symbol of 
self-control, tact. 

Covington, Ohio, R. R. j. ' 

♦ 4* * 

In all nature's vocabulary there is no such word as 
stagnation. There is progress and there is retrogres- 
sion, and each is a movement. She knows no other 
road, and on either of these two paths all creation 
move. — W. D. Little. 



52 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



SOME FAMOUS WOMEN. 



BY OLIVE MILLER. 



Rosa Bonheur. 

In the year 1822, in Bordeaux, France, there was 
born a child who was destined to become the greatest 
artist among the women of the nineteenth century. 
Her full name was Marie Rosalie Bonheur (Bonur) 
but she was always known simply as Rosalie or Rosa. 
The story of her life is very interesting, but neverthe- 
less it is one of hard and ceaseless labor. 

Her father was a landscape painter of considerable 
talent, but finding it very difficult in those early days 
to secure sale for pictures he moved his family to 
Paris. But even here he was obliged to teach rather 
than develop his own love for painting. Although 
Rosa had several brothers and sisters who were art- 
ists, she was her father's pride and it was to him a 
labor of love to teach her the first principles of art 
and to train her in drawing from life, thus developing 
in her a sureness of eye that served her well in all 
her work. She early showed great fondness for pets 
and animals and soon began to paint pictures of them. 

At the age of eighteen her mother died, but although 
this must have placed new responsibilities upon her, 
she continued her work without interruption. That 
same year she exhibited her first pictures at the Sa- 
lon, one a painting of sheep and goats, the other rab- 
bits nibbling carrots. These pictures were not exe- 
cuted in a large, well-lighted studio, such as she 
owned in later j^ears, but in an old attic which Rosa 
and her father had fitted up for this work. About 
this time her father married again and the children 
found in their step-mother a wealth of love which 
compensated as far as possible for the loss which they 
sustained in the death of their mother. 

After the painting of the rabbit picture, every year 
Miss Bonheur sent pictures to the Salon, and each 
year she showed remarkable progress. At the age of 
twenty-seven she produced her " Le Labourage Niv- 
ernais " or " Tillage in France." for which she was 
awarded first medal. But the greatest of all her paint- 
ings, and the one that has brought her greatest re- 
nown is " Marche aux Chevaux " or the " Horse Fair." 
To paint a horse is not easy, much less to give it its 
finest colorings and to show its muscular strength and 
graceful beauty. People stood before this great pic- 
ture in silent wonder, feeling it was a masterpiece of 
its kind. It was exhibited throughout England and 
France and was finally broiight to America by Mr. 
A. T. Stewart. Later it was bought by Cornelius 
A/'anderbilt and is now in the Metropolitan Musenm 
in New York City. Surely America is proud to count 



this picture among her art treasures. Other paintings 
of note are " Haymaking Season in Auvergne," " On 
the Alert," and " A Foraging Party." 

After her father died in 1853, she taught a draw- 
ing-school for young ladies, besides spending much 
of her time traveling through the Pyrenees Mts., vis- 
iting England and Scotland and diflferent parts of 
France. She always brought back with her new ma- 
terials for her work. 

At the end of ten years she bought an estate at 
Fontainebleau, and here she spent the remainder of 
her life in deep seclusion. The house in which she 
lived is a rambling structure, situated in the village of 
By, at the head of a row of cottages all whitewashed 
and picturesque. Across the road stretch the broad 
fields, replete with rustic scenery. The house itself 
was built of brick and stone and dates back to the 
eighteenth century, as is shown by its queer gables, 
massive chimneys and dormer windows. It seems to 
have been enlarged from time to time as fancy dictated. 
A high wall surrounds the house, and through a small 
grating in this wall one could catch glimpses of fine, 
large dogs, alert and active. But other than this of 
the enclosure was barred from sight. Rarely was a 
visitor admitted, but if one was so fortunate as to gain 
an entrance, a cordial welcome greeted him. Devoted 
servants in blue peasant dress guarded the mistress 
with jealous care, and she in turn proved her affec- 
tion for them by a constant kindness. 

She had several studios, all on upper floors, the 
one to the front commanding a fine view of the 
Seine in the distance. From the side wings one had 
a view of the large parks in which she kept her an- 
imals, — lions, deer, chamois, besides all the inhabitants, 
of the farmyard. These animals knew their mistress 
and watched for her morning visits, when she lingered 
to study their every graceful movement. 

Her largest studio was in every way such a room 
as would suit Miss Bonheur's ■ taste. The polished 
floor was overlaid with handsome rugs, on the finest 
of which generally reposed her favorite white spaniel. 
A few pictures adorned the walls: portraits of her 
father and mother and a few landscapes painted by 
her father. On easels and piled against the walls were 
pictures of all sizes and in every medium, — oil, water- 
color and pastel. Her greatest desire was to finish 
these pictures before she finally laid down the brush. 
To accomplish this aim, she worked early and late: 
even the infirmities of advancing years did not hinder 
her from rising at dawn. So the crowning honors 
which came to her in the latter years of her life were 
well earned. 

Not fnr from her chateau at Fontainebleau is the 
palace of Fontainebleau, at one time, the favorite sum- 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



53 



mer home of Napoleon III and Princess Eugenie. 
The Princess was a warm admirer of Miss Bonheur, 
and begged Napoleon to bestow upon her the cross 
of the Legion of Honor. But as this title had never 
yet been bestowed upon a woman as a recognition 
of talent alone, Napoleon's counselors were opposed to 
the act. This was in 1864, but the next summer, 
during the absence of the Emperor, Eugenie acted as 
regent. Her first act, after going to .her palace for 
the summer, was to drive through the woods to Miss 
Bonheur's chateau, and surprising her in her working 
blouse of blue, she pinned upon her the cross and bit 
of ribbon that made her Knight of the Legion of 
Honor, the highest honor that the Imperial Govern- 
ment could bestow. 

But in 1893, in recognition of the excellency of her 
work at the Columbian Exposition, she was awarded 
the title of Officer of the Legion of Honor, a distinc- 
tion unsurpassed by any woman painter of her time. 
She died in 1899 at the advanced age of seventy-nine 
years. And yet, after all, she had accomplished in 
the realm of art, she declared she had enough in mind 
to fill two or three lifetimes ! 

* * ♦ 
THE BLIND CAT. 



BY MAUDE HAWKINS. 



Some people will argue that dumb animals never 
think, but I am convinced that they do and not only 
that, but they exercise a great deal of reasoning power. 
To illustrate: let me tell you of an old blind cat that 
once belonged to our household. 

Before her affliction came she was very devoted 
to a full grown offspring of hers which was several 
years old. But nevertheless it was cared for by the 
mother cat, as tenderly as when it was a little mewing 
kitten. It took all this care, as a matter of fact ; it was 
quite contented and took life easy, generally. Many 
were the fine mice and birds that she feasted upon, — 
the product of her mother's powers and industry. 

But there came a time when the mother's useful- 
ness in this world ceased, for alas, she found herself 
in total blindness. Then, even before any of the fam- 
ily had discovered her misfortune, the conditions were 
reversed. The trophies of the hunt were brought by 
the younger cat, and laid reverently at the feet of the 
mother. Indeed she seemed to realize from the first 
that she was tmder her special care, and she must be 
eyes for her as well as a provider. For on no occasion 
would she allow her to wander away alone. And at 
night when they were put outside to seek their own bed 
in the barn, she would walk by her side, guiding her 
with many a pur or mew till the place was reached. 



and she saw her safely snuggled down for the night's 
rest. 

Here the old cat slept until called by the younger 
one. And no amount of coaxing or calling by any 
member of the family could induce her to arise till 
summoned by her faithful nurse, often after having 
taken an early ramble tlirough the fields in search of 
prey. She would invariably call her when meals were 
about to be served in the house, and in man)' ways 
showed her solicitude for her welfare. 

No child could have been more kind or looked after 
the comforts of a dear, beloved parent more faithfully 
than did this cat. Finally the old cat in the absence 
of her tender guide, wandered to the street and was run 
over by a passing wagon. All night the kitten wan- 
dered and worried about her. This I know by her ac- 
tions in the morning. When I opened the outside door 
she was the first to meet me, with many cries of dis- 
tress. When I went toward her to discover the cause 
of her grief, she would bound towards the barn, stop- 
ping now and then to ascertain if I was following her. 
Finding that I was still in the doorway, she would 
return and repeat her entreaties only to dart away 
toward the barn again. Finally I followed her to her 
bed, and there she told me as plainly as anyone could, 
that it was empty, by many cries and much jumping 
in and out of bed, and looking at me with beseeching 
eyes asking for help in her sad bereavement. I did 
not then understand her meaning, but later in the day, 
when we found our old friend's mangled body by the 
roadside, we kne-m all. 

Torvanda, Pa. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
NEW CLOCK REGULATOR. 



A NEW method of driving and regulating clocks 
electrically by the use of selenium cells has been de- 
vised by Herr K. Siegl. The selenium cell, by Rhu- 
mer, in an exhausted pair-shaped buib, was placed in 
the focus of a parabolic cylinder mirror, so that the 
light from an incandescent lamp could impinge upon 
the cell whenever a second pendulum passed its low- 
est point, at which a slit in a card fastened on the 
pendulum coincided with a slit on a fixed screen. The 
effect on the selenium is made to actuate an electro 
magnet — placed just to one side off the point of the 
cell — so that an impulse is imparted to the pendulum 
at the right moment. Another selenium cell can be 
used for imparting motion to a series of other elecv 
trically operated clocks, which can be of the step by 
step type. A clock on these lines has given 
satisfaction and demonstrated that an electric clock 
without contacts can be made. 
* ♦ ♦ 

Se:eve God by doing common actions in a heavenly 
spirit. — Spurgeon. 



54 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



MOUNT VERNON, VIRGINIA. 



BY ANNA BOWMAN. 



It is a beautiful sail down the historic Potomac 
river, from Washington D. C, to Mt. Vernon, the 
home of Geo. Washington. A view of old " Fort 
Washington " may be had, while on the opposite side 
picturesque Virginia scenery charms the eye. A fine 
view may be had of Mt. Vernon in passing down the 
river to land on the Maryland side at " Marshall Hall," 
where our party took refreshments. From this point 
the boat "The Charles McAllister" conveys all tour- 
ists to the Mt. Vernon Wharf. 

We found our perspiration rising with our patriot- 
ism as we climbed the hill leading to the tomb, the 
home and plantation of our most universally beloved 
President. We approached the tomb of George and 
Martha Washington, into which we were permitted 
to look through iron bars, but could not enter ; the 
keeper told us that many years ago the gate was locked 
forever and the key thrown into the Potoniac river. 
The vine-covered barn, built in 1733, stands farther up 
the hill; this we got permission to enter and found 
it to be in good repair, and still occupied by the keep- 
er's horses. Near by stands the old coach house and 
we took a look at the clumsy old coach, in which we 
imagine we could see Washington riding in state. It 
is an interesting old relic, to be sure, and it gave us 
no uncertain sound regarding its age. 

On just a little farther and we come to the deer 
park and the garden, each being laid out by Washing- 
ton himself, and are extremely interesting to the ob- 
serving eye. We enter the house in which the Wash- 
ingtons lived, and look especially at the rooms in 
which each died, they being furnished in antique co- 
lonial style. We take a view of the quaint old kitchen, 
separated from the main building by a long porch, 
and call attention to some of the articles found in that 
old fireplace. Let us see whether we would enjoy 
domestic science of the eighteenth century. 

Going through the door from the porch the fire- 
place is on our left, while to the right of the fireplace, 
the space is occupied by an old-fashioned bake oven, 
very much like those abandoned ones we find in the 
back yards of some old Virginia homes. The fire- 
place is eight feet long, five feet high and five fe?t 
deep. Not so small is it? In it are two large and- 
irons (commonly called dog irons) on which are piled 
the huge back log, with smaller logs in front, all ready 
to start the fire. And should " Black Mammy " re- 
turn to revive those " good old days " of fireplace 
cookery, she would find the tinder on the mantel, with 
which to strike the light, for she would not use our 



method, while the young pickaninny would reach the 
bellows from the fireplace wall and help " blow up " 
the fire to start the pot boiling. 

Attached to the front of the andirons on which iron 
rods (pointed at one end) are laid, are rods called 
" spitz " which are used for holding the meats 
when roasting. The arrangement for turning the 
meats while roasting is also quite interesting; the ar- 
ticle with which this is done is called a " smoke jack." 
It consists of a double chain attached to the spitz, and 
also to a fan up the chimney which is affected by the 
smoke as our windmill fans are by the wind, thus turn- 
ing the spitz. But when a small roast is desired 
a clock jack is used; it is a brass cylindrical machine 
which hangs from the outside center of the fireplace, 
and when wound up turns the article, placed on the 
suspended hook. 

In the back part of the fireplace is found what is 
called " the crane " ; it is an iron bar with hooks at- 
tached and hanging from these is a teakettle and three 
iron cook pots, varying in size, ready for a boiled din- 
ner. Setting on either side between the andirons and 
the wall, are three large and one small dutch oven. 
We had the privilege of eating some of this dutch oven 
bread, and even took some lessons in baking it. I did 
not ask the names of the deep skillets with short legs 
and close covers, for I remember how we had to pet 
a campfire in order to get coals on which to set the 
oven, as well as cover the lid. 

Spiders, skillets and a tripod for keeping dishes 
warm, as well as several kinds of toasters, are hanging 
on the walls of the fireplace, or standing in the corners, 
while the usual large shovel and tongj adorn either 
side. 

As in the old colonial kitchen, this fireplace has its 
string of red peppers on its wall, while over the mantel 
hang bunches of dried herbs. 

On the mantel beside the tinder are a coffee mortar 
and several iron candlesticks, while a hominy mortar 
sets on the hearth. These mortars are of iron or brass 
and the article is crushed with a heavy stone or iron 
very similar to the Mexican metals now in use by the 
Mexicans, and found in prehistoric ruins of Arizona 
and New Mexico. 

Now you will observe there is a great difference 
between modern methods and those used in preparing 
the meals for our first president, yet they had some 
conveniences with which I was not acquainted, until 
I stood by that old fire place and wrote, while I inter- 
rogated the lady in charge, as to the names and uses 
of all the things found there. I am sure we would all 
be interested in the preparation of a meal by this old 
fireplace, and enjoy eating it no less, yet I wonder if 
it would not be harder for us to accommodate ourselves 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



55 



to that way than for one of those colonial dames to take 
charge of a model kitchen of to-day. We would not 
want to go back to those days, for the work on the 
woodpile is too hard for our boys, and our girls would 
fume over the blackened pots and kettles, but if we 
get real hungry for an old-time meal, we can get it 
still ; we can find the fireplace, the hoecake and all in 
many homes in the mountains of Eastern Virginia. 
Z2i8 Force St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

* 4* 4* 
THE ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE IN ACTION. 



A BLACK iron monster, with reversible front and a 
corridor extending from end to end, and communicat- 
ing with the cars it draws, — such is the general ap- 
pearance of the famous electric locomotive. In non- 
technical language, it consists of a ninety-five ton en- 
gine on four driving axles, the motive power being 
produced directly, without intermediate gearing, from 
a powerful electric motor, developing a capacity of 
2,200 horse power, which can be increased to 3,000. 
The method is by the third rail, a section of six miles 
in the open country west of Schenectady having been 
equipped especially for this trial by the General Elec- 
tric Company, which also furnished the power for the 
tests. This third rail was protected by a wooden hood, 
so that no one could reach it unless he tried. At 
crossings or other places where the third rail was in- 
terrupted, the motive power was supplied by connec- 
tion with an overhead wire, a trolley from the loco- 
motive meeting it at these points by means of a pneu- 
matic device controlled by the engineer. The frame 
of the locomotive is of steel, which acts also as part 
of the magnetic circuit for the motors. In the test at 
Schenectady, the center of the cab was taken up by a 
set of recording instruments showing speed, voltage, 
consumption of current, how curves are taken, and 
various other qualities of the locomotive. When in 
use hauling trains, however, this space will be occu- 
pied by a heating apparatus. According to law, there 
must be two men on the locomotive,: — the master en- 
gineer and a helper, who will take the place of the old- 
time fireman. In designing a locomotive, the gen- 
eral features of the steam engine have been kept in 
mind, and valves, whistles, controllers, bells, and other 
devices are within easy reach of the engineer. It was 
the aim of the designers to secure in this machine the 
best mechanical features of the high speed steam loco- 
motive combined with the enormous power and sim- 
plicity in control made' possible by the use of the elec- 
tric drive. The elimination of gear and bearing losses 
permits of a very high efficiency ; and it is claimed for 
the new machine that it will pound and roll much less 
than the steam locomotive, and thus reduce the expense 
of maintaining the rails and roadbed. By the use of 



the Sprague General Electric multiple-system of con- 
trol, two or more locomotives can be coupled together 
and operated from the leading cab as a single unit. — 
From " Electric vs. Steam Locomotives," in the Amer- 
can Monthly Reviezv of Reviezvs for December. 

* * 4* 
ADDS CAR OF NOVEL DESIGN. 



Something entirely new in the way of railroad 
equipment has just been procured by the Milwaukee 
and St. Paul road for use on its Overland Limited 
trains between Chicago and Omaha. It is what is 
called a " composite observation " car, the idea being 
to furnish women passengers an opportunity of taking 
in the beauties of the scenery with the greatest possible 
amount of comfort and entirely free from the fumes 
of tobacco smoke. The car is divided into two main 
parts, one of which is divided from the other very 
much after the manner of a compartment sleeping car, 
with a lobby running down the side of the inclosed 
space. This inclosure is for the use of the smokers 
and those seeking other refreshments from the buffet. 

Another noteworthy feature of the new style of car 
is its extraordinary strength. Throughout the car 
there has been placed a series of steel arches, which 
bind sills and sides together and strengthen the roof 
in a manner which renders the car almost indestruc- 
tible. 

The interior woodwork is all of St. Jago mahogany 
and presents a very rich appearance. The car is 
lighted with Pintsch gas and electricity. It is also 
furnished with electric fans by which the temperature 
may be moderated in the hottest summer weather. 

In both the observation-room and smoking-rooms 
writing desks have been provided and in the observa- 
tion-room library are stands on which recent periodicals 
are always to be found. — Chicago Chronicle, Novem- 
ber 20, 1904. 

♦ 4> ♦ 

A BIG ALLIGATOR. 



A BIG alligator, measuring 11 feet 8 inches, which 
was caught at Harris's place, was brought to Pensa- 
cola, Fla., and taken to Norman's saloon. The big 
fellow was unloaded from the vessel that brought him 
to the city and loaded upon a dray on South Palafox 
street, a crowd collecting to watch the operation. The 
reptile's mouth was securely tied with a heavy rope, 
and he was so nearly dead that he could not resent 
the rough handling. Had he been in fighting trim 
it is more than likely that several people who in- 
cautiously grabbed him would now be under the care 
of a physican. The alligator was shot through the 
head in shallow water, making his capture compara- 
tively easy. 



56 



THE INGLEiMOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



AWAY DOWN SOUTH. 



BY A. G. CROSSWHITE. 



Just ivhen I cannot say with any degree of certain- 
ty; but it will be safe to say "once upon a time." 
My father was a boot and shoemaker as well as a 
minister of the Gospel. He was an invalid pensioner 
of the Mexican War; and, with his government aid 
and the revenues from the bench was enabled to keep 
the wolf from the door and preach as often as the 
disturbed conditions incident to the Rebellion would 
permit. 

I was a little man of some seven summers already 
in possession of a fiddle, stringless and bridgeless, and 
now forever voiceless inasmuch as I had turned it 
aside from its natural use and now used it as my 
horse " Selim." 

My sister Emma who is now sweetly sleeping in 
a Southern cemetery was eight years my senior to 
the very day and being the first-born of a family of 
eight was very much devoted to father and seemed 
to appreciate the hard licks that must make ends meet 
■ in those perilous times when most of the money in cir- 
culation was so depreciated that wealthier children 
used it as thumb-paper in their books. 

Flour was worth probably fifty dollars per hundred 
and wheat bread was only a Sunday luxury. ■ Very lit- 
tle was raised on the farms for the able-bodied men 
were all in the war. What was gathered together 
by the underlings, the overlings and women was con- 
fiscated or destroyed by the soldiers. There were no 
restraining orders for everything was under military 
rule and lawlessness reigned supreme. The "' Home 
Guards " were supposed to protect the women and 
children and those who were exempt because of age 
or physical debility. A few people of nonresistant 
principles chiefly the Quakers and the Brethren were 
exempt from military duty on the payment of a fine 
of five hundred dollars. But even these people were 
not always exempt from the murderous attacks of 
the " Bushwhackers " or Guerrillas. Now, this " Once 
upon a time " refers to a certain occasion when nei- 
ther at my was stationed near us. 

All of a sudden we were completely taken by sur- 
prise when about a dozen or more of those dreaded 
" Bushwhackers " in dirty, tattered garments, big 
clanking spurs, their Satanic bodies girdled with ugly 
looking revolvers and their faces concealed by masks 
boK'^i'' into father's little shop entirely unbidden and 
demanded to know why he was not in the service. 
He replied that he had exemption papers and was 
working through much pain at times to shield the feet 
of some of his poor neighbors from the biting frost? 



and snows of the hard winter that was already up- 
on us 

My sister was watching with superciUious glances 
their every movement and soon decided that she had 
seen some of them before. They told father that they 
were in hard luck and had come to relieve him of 
all his stock on hand. When they started to go up 
stairs sister decided that they should not take it and 
so followed the villains up much to my father's dis- 
comfort. 

Father worked on with trembling hand for had he 
dared to expostulate with them or prevent this daring 
daylight robbery he would have been in eternity in 
less time than it takes to tell it. 

Just over his head his stock of leather, boots and 
shoes lay concealed ; but what had Satan commissioned 
such fiends for but to take the very bread out of the 
very mouths of helpless children? An unusually large 
supply was on hands that day and they chuckled with 
delight at their rich haul. 

One of them opened a big sack and another one be- 
gan piling in father's hard earnings and that of his 
neighbors as well. This was too much for sister and 
she began to place them out of their reach. The leader 
was rather amused at her pluck and blurted out in 
a rough sarcastic voice, " Oh, dear me, little gorl, who 
are you any way ? " " You know who I am," said she, 
"and I know you, too." "You do, eh?" "well tell 
my name if 3'ou can, little lady." " Yon," said she, " are 

Sam B ;" ''You are Wash P ;" "you are 

Bill B' " and so on, pointing to each as she spoke. 

" You have something on your faces, but I know 
you any way, for yoit have been here before, and I 
am not going to let you have all my papa's things." 

" Get away " said the ruffian, " or FU brain you." 
Just then one of the men who was enjoying the scene 
spoke up, " Say, little miss, that's the mettle I like ; you 
just say vvhat you please." Nerved by this safeguard 
she spoke more decidedly. " Now, my papa works 
hard and you shall not take these things." With this 
she armed herself with a boot-tree and stood facing 
the thief, " Hit him " said one of his pals, " and if 
he lifts his finger against you he will be a dead man." 

She held the unwieldy weapon ready for the final 
blow still cheered on by those burly back-woodsmen, 
little realizing what the final outcome would be. This 
was too much for these degenerates and they quit pil- 
ing in those guarded treasures. 

It would have required the bravado and heartlessness 
of a maniac to have struck a woman or a girl and 
they had to desist or break over the simplest form 
of guerrilla etiquette. Not contented with this she 
ordered them to empty their sacks which they did in 
double-quick time. One of them quickly stepped to 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



57 



her side, patted her on the back and said in a defiant 
tone, " Three cheers foi; the bonnie lassie that dares 
to stand up against sucli men, three cheers, Httlc girl," 
and away they went, God only knows where. 
Flora, Ind. ^ ^ ^ 

TOO BUSY TO LOVE. 



" Mother'd love me a whole lot, too, if she wasn't 
too busy," loyally declared a small maiden, who had 
hungrily watched the home leave-taking of a little com- 
panion as they set off for school. " She has pretty 
much housework to do." 

The " much housework " and other work seem 
to take precedence of love in many households where 
the members would be shocked if they fully realized 
the fact. Love their own? Of course they do, and 
all the toil is for the sake of these beloved ones, they 
sa_v, and really believe. And yet the work becomes a 
fetich — not something for the family comfort, but 
something before which all else must give way, to 
which everything else must be sacrificed. Washing, 
ironing, sweeping, dusting must take their appointed 
course and be finished according to schedule time, 
whatever becomes of life's higher needs. There is no 
elasticity in the S3'stem, no time for tenderness or sym- 
pathy ; for the hour's talk that might clear awa)' doubt 
and misgiving; for comforting sore hearts or bind- 
ing up wounded spirits. There are usually notable 
housekeepers in such households — women of whom 
neighbors speak admiringly, and recount the won- 
ders they accomplish— but there is seldom any deep 
home spirit. Work counts for something until some 
dreary day when the inevitable shadow falls across the 
threshold, and all things change values. The tasks 
that seemed so important only yesterday, what do 
they matter? 

" But oh, for the touch of a vanished hand,' 
And the sound of a voice that is still?" 

— Forivard. 
♦ <> ♦ 

SOUTHERN BRIMSTONE. 



The Anglo-Sicilian Company, which has controlled 
the market, has refused to make price concessions, re- 
lying upon the increasing demand to consume the ex- 
isting surplus, but it is predicted that the appearance 
of competition from the southern part of the United 
States may have some effect upon jirices. The first 
shipment of consequence to the North has just arrived 
in New York and consists of 3,000 tons. There are 
others to follow for that port, Philadelphia and other 
points in Northern and Western States. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
A CAT AND A CANARY. 



The following story was sent in a letter to the 
editor of Our Four-footed Friends: 

" I want to tell you a cat story (the truth of which 
I know) that you may use in your little magazine. 
Mrs. R. had a cat, a dog and a canary bird, all of 
which were content, and more, in the care and love 
of a gentle heart. The cat, Kitty, was very fond of the 
bird and would sit beneath the cage and listen to the 
singing with every evidence of pleasure and pride. 
Two years ago last summer Mrs. R. was in her rear 
yard with her flowers when Kitty came running to 
her, mewing loudly, and then ran back toward the 
house, repeating her dumb efforts. Finally Mrs. R. 
said : " Well, Kitty, Til come in and see what is the 
trouble." As She passed in the door a strange cat ran 
out. The cage was on the floor and the bird was dead. 
And now for the real heart of the story, for the ver- 
acity of which I can vouch. The empty cage was re- 
hung in the window ; Kitty came and stood beneath 
the cage, looking up and mewing. For two days she 
stood, then she lay down ; she refused food ; delicacies 
that once she had enjoyed she did not notice. On the 
morning of the fourth day after the bird had died 
ICitty was found dead beneath the empty cage. She 
had loved the bird, and she could' not live without it." 

♦ I?* ♦ 
THE OLDEST LIVING ANIMAL. 



I 



The producers of brimstone in Louisiana intend 
henceforth to compete actively for the business in the 
principal markets in the United States and if possible 
supplant the Sicilian exporters, who have hitherto 
practically controlled the trade. This departure is due 
to the increase in production in the South and the more 
favorable freight rates which the producers have been 
able to obtain from the transportation companies. 

The consumption of brimstone in the United States 
and in other countries as well has been steadil}' increas- 
ing during the last few years, but the production in 
Sicily has also increased and at the end of the first 
half of last month the accumulated stocks in that coun- 
try were 289,999 tons. 



A LONDON paper says that they believe at St. Louis 
they have on show the oldest known inhabitant of the 
globe. It is a land tortoise from one of the Seychelles 
Islands, off tne coast of Madagascar. The reptile has 
been an object of veneration among the Natives for 
150 years, and is believed to have been 100 years old 
before its giant size attracted special attention. The 
longest living animal is the elephant, which attains 
120 years, but probably the tortoise lives occasionally 
to a much more advanced age. The animal at St. 
Louis weighs over Sj^cwt., and is still strong and 
vigorous. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Home is the sacred refuge of our life. — Dryden. 



58 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



THE MOUNTAIN LION. 



BY S. Z. SHARP. 

(Felis Concolor.) 

This lai-ge wild animal, also called caugar, puma, 
and panther, is found in the western part of America 
from Canada to Patagonia. In color it is yellowish 
brown or tawny above and paler underneath. It meas- 
ures two and a half feet in height and about six and 
a half feet in length from tip of nose to tip of tail. 
The jaguar, felis onca, also called American lion, found 
from Texas, Mexico, Central America to southern 
Brazil, differs slightly from the panther in being more 
slender, a little longer, and having a smaller head. In 
color it is yellowish brown, with dark rings encir- 
cling a darker spot. 

Comparing the panther with the African lioness, 
both close together in the zoological gardens at St. 
Louis, we noticed a marked similarity between them; 
both being devoid of a mane and resembling each oth- 
er in size and form, entitling this denizen of western 
America to be called a lion. 

Some authors say that the panther is becoming 
scarce, but the stockmen of Mesa County, Colo., claun 
that it is still too plentiful in this region as well as ni 
others that border on the principal range of the Rocky 
Mountains. His raids upon calves and colts are some- 
times quite destructive, as he will kill more than he 
can eat. For colts he seems to have a special fond- 
ness as many of our neighbors testify who keep their 
stock in summer on the mountain ranges. Not only 
colts, but often large horses fall victims to the rapacity 
of the mountain lion. We have now in our stable a 
large mare bearing a long scar on her side, the effect 
of a rent made by the powerful claws of a lion which 
killed her colt. 

One method of securing his prey is for the lion to 
crouch upon a large limb of a tree and over a path 
followed by cattle or horses. From his perch the 
lion watches his prey as a cat watches for a mouse 
and at the proper moment springs upon its back and 
inserts his long fangs into the victim's neck, close to 
the head, causing the animal to fall down helpless. 
A stockman gives the following description of an at- 
tack which he witnessed, and which was made by a 
lioness and her two well-grown kittens upon a large 
horse : 

" The two young lions began to play with each 
other at a' considerable distance and just in sight of 
the horse. At last they gained his attention and he 
began to watch their maneuvers, riveting his atten- 
tion upon them, Then the .lioness made a long detour 
through the bushes, unobserved until she came behind 



the horse and close to him, then suddenly sprang upon 
his hind limbs and with her sharp teeth severed the 
tendons of his hockjoint and the horse was hamstrung. 
The young lions then rushed to their mother to help 
finish the catch and begin the feast. The play of the 
young lions in the distance, the stealthy, hidden, ap- 
proach of the lioness toward her victim, her attack 
at the most vulnerable part, all tend to illustrate the 
wonderful instinct given by the Creator to some ani- 
mals to obtain their food. 

Mountain lions are not easily found or destroyed. 
In was in 1900 shortly after -his election to the office of 
Vice-President, that Mr. Roosevelt entered upon an 
extensive lion hunt about sixty miles northeast of 
this valley. Accompanied by skillful hunters and well 
trained dogs and well equipped for such an exciting 
chase, his efforts were crowned w;th decided success. 
On one occasion a lion being shot at several times 
at long range the animal would leap from the tree 
and run until too closely pursued by the dogs when it 
would run up another tree. At last two dogs caught 
the lion on either jaw and held him fast until the hunt- 
ers came up. The dogs being well trained kept their 
front legs well under their bodies and out of reach 
of the lion's powerful claws, and thus escaped being 
torn to pieces. The future president quickly taking 
in the critical situation of the dogs, rushed up and 
plunged his long hunter's knife into the lion's heart. 
From this hunt Mr. Roosevelt returned home with the 
skins of nine mountain lions and those of a number 
of wild cats. 

Fruita, Colo. 

♦ 4* ♦ 

FASCINATION. 

BY HARVEY H. SAYLOR. 



A FEW days ago while riding into Pittsburg on a 
crowded trolley car, two well-dressed respectable look- 
ing ladies entered the car and on account of the crowd- 
ed condition I could not help but hear their conver- 
r-ation which was as follows : — 

I do not know what Jeannette means by keeping 
company with that fellow ; I do not think that he is 
much, but he has been able to put on appearance and 
that fascinated her so that she thinks he is the only 
one. 

Did you take notice last Friday evening at the party 
how put out and worried she was? It was simply 
because he didn't come ; she was expecting him. He 
surely must not think much of her or he would come 
oftener to see her ; possibly he has another girl or 
girls some place else and doesn't care much for her. 
Jeannette is accomplished and plays well, and could 
have the company of young men of worth whom she 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



59 



knows ; I think she is foolish. Now right here was the 
same thing that I so often thought about. By their 
conversation I inferred that he was a man of short 
acquaintance at that place, and it always seems so 
strange that a person should become fascinated by a 
stranger who has appearance only without any real 
knowledge of his real character. How low we set our 
ideals and how soon we are willing to make ac- 
quaintances for which we may be sorry afterwards. 
Boys and girls need to be impressed with the thought 
of high ideals and striving for them. To treat every 
one with courtesy, but to be slow in forming friend- 
ships. Now, here is where culture is needed. Man- 
hood is not the gift of fortune, but the slow growth 
of our thoughts and actions. Each day we are mak- 
ing, knowingly or unknowingly the grooves in which 
our future thoughts will move. In many ways we 
are the makers of our own destinies and when people 
become educated fully along that line they will judge 
more by the true worth rather than by reputation, 
appearance, or popularity. 
Roscoe, Pa. 

♦ * ♦ 
COMPASS PLANT. 



" Sailors, when they're lost, get their bearings from 
the stars," said a Western miner. " Lost landsmen, 
knowing nothing about astronomy, must trust to their 
botanical knowledge to lead them home. If I ever 
get lost on the prairies I look for a compass plant. 
This plant is a pretty common growth on the Western 
plains, and its leaves always point due north. If you 
know where north is, you are sure the south is behind 
you, the east on your right and the west on your left, 
and there is nothing for you to do but to push ou- 
tward in the direction your home lies. Thus the 
compass plant has saved many a lost traveler from 
death on the plains. Woodsmen tell me that, when 
they get lost, they find due north by examining the 
tree trunks. On the side of the trunks that faces 
north the moss, they claim, always grows the thickest. 
Moss will be found, to a certain extent, all over the 
trunks, but on the north side there will be two or three 
times as much of it." 

^ ♦ ♦ 
THE BOAT THE GNATS BUILD. 



Did you ever hear about the wonderful boats the 
gnats build? They lay their eggs in the water, and 
the eggs float until it is time for them to hatch. You 
can see these little egg-rafts on almost any pool in 
the summer. 

The eggs are so heavy that one alone would sink. 
The cunning mother fastens them all together until 
they form a hollow boat. It will not upset, even if it 
is filled with water. The upper ends of these eggs are 



pointed, and look very much like a powder flask. One 
end is glued to another, pointed end up, until the boat 
is finished. And how many eggs do you think it 
takes? From two hundred fifty to three hundred. 
When the young are hatched, they always come from 
the under side, leaving the empty boat afloat. 

These eggs are very, very small. First they are 
white, then green, then dark-gray. Then they change 
again to a kind of sheath. In another week this sheath 
bursts open, and lets out a winged mosquito. It is all 
ready for work. There are so many born in a sum- 
mer that, were it not for the birds and larger insects, 
we should be " eaten up alive." — Our Little Ones. 
^ ^ ^ 
CATCHING COLD. 



Everybody is complaining of colds just now. I 
think the cause is that people keep their houses too 
hot and dress indifferently to the temperature. 

Men seldom vary their dress, but women are con- 
stantly changing from the thinnest of lace blouses, 
which expose the neck and chest, to fur wraps and 
heavy boas round the throat. Then they sit in warm 
rooms with big fires, and go out, perhaps, in the same 
clothes they wear indoors. 

Sleeping with the window open and bathing the 
chest every morning with cold water are admirable 
preventives of cold, and putting on a wrap when leav- 
ing a warm room is also good. 

A cool atmosphere never gives cold ; it is the per- 
petual changes of temperature that do so. 

Ladies' colds arise often from the practice of tea 
drinking and paying calls during the afternoon, and 
also from sitting in clubs in their outdoor garments. 

Latterly the chorus of incessant coughs in ladies' 
clubs has been most distressing, and such colds must 
be very infectious. 

* * * 

WHERE WOMEN SHUN MEN. 



On a small island in the Greek Archipelago there 
is a colony which, is composed entirely of women. It 
is a sort of religious order which considers it a dis- 
grace for one of its members to even look at a man. 
When a fisherman approaches the island, the women 
pull the gray cowls of their cassocks over their heads 
and turn their backs. Provisions are never imported, 
as the women, strict vegetarians, grow their own pro- 
ducts. Only the matron, who is annually elected 
head of the colony, is ever allowed to leave the island. 
The others remain there all their lives, taking their 
turn at tilling the soil, washing and housekeeping. 

* * * 
Recollect that trifles make perfection, and that per- 
fection is no trifle. — Michael Angela. 



6o 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



SUNYA AND TILLIE. 



BY S. N. M CANN. 



SuNYA is an old mother cat and Tillie a very moth- 
erly dog. The two were grown up together and such 
intimate friendship and love as they manifested is 
seldom seen between the cat and dog family. The two 
not only romped and played together, but the old 
mother dog treated the cat as her own little ones. 
The cat would take her meal of warm milk with the 
little puppies and would often have the privilege when 
the little puppies did not. The motherly old dog 
would lie down and let the cat nurse long after she had 
no milk to give. The old cat would act just like a 
little kitten never allowing her nails to hurt her friend. 
I tried twice to get a picture for the Nook of the dog 
nursing the cat with her little puppies, but failed, as 
they both seem to suspicion mischief and would not 
perform when the kodak was about. The motherly old 
dog died a short time ago and all hopes of their pic- 
ture is ended so I send you these few notes. I often 
saw them fondling each other and the old cat nursing, 
as they belonged to one of our native Christians here. 

Anklesvar, India. 

>♦♦ ^ 4t 

THE SIMPLE LIFE. 



BY D. Z. ANGLE. 



A SHORT time ago one of our neighbors, Mr. H , 

killed a beef, as we commonly term it, and not needing 
it all for his own immediate use, decided to retail a 
party of the meat direct to some of the people of Mt. 
Vernon. While at this business, he called at a colored 
man's place of residence and seeing the dark lady of 
the house out in the yard washing clothes he accosted 
her in substance as follows. " Madam, do you want 
any beef to-day ? " 

Her somewhat lofty answer was, " No sah ! we done 
got possum and sweet taters." 

Mt. Vernon, III. 

<;$» A 4$* 

WILD DOGS OF CENTRAL AFRICA. 



The wild dog of Central Africa, an explorer writes, 
is common enough. He is an ugly-looking beast, with 
a pied body, coarse hair, short head and large up- 
right ears. These wild dogs play fearful havoc with 
game, occasionally clearing out whole districts precisely 
in the same manner as the red dhole of India, before 
which even the tiger is said to retreat. 

They have a wonderful power of scent, wonderful 
boldness, endurance and pertinacity, and their loose, 
easy gallop covers the ground far more quickly than 
it appears to do. They usually hunt in considerable 



packs, although I have sometimes met them in threes 
and fours. I have never heard of wild dogs actually 
attacking man, but they often behave as if on the point 
of doing so, and unarmed travelers have been literally 
treed by them before now. 

■<■' ♦> ♦> 

A BABOON SWITCHMAN. 



Until quite recently there was a baboon acting as 
switch tender on one of the railroads in South Africa. 
He was a powerful animal, nicknamed Ceese, and was 
the property of a native switchman. He had been 
taught to turn the switch at points while his master 
looked on, but he soon showed such intelligence in the 
work that he came to do it alone, locking the rod and 
doing other details as well as a man. The engineer did 
not object to his work and had great confidence in his 
ability. He would often jump on the shifting engine 
as it passed on its way to move cars about the yard, 
but only after he had opened the switch for it. But 
as soon as the story of the baboon's work came to the 
ears of the officials they were forced to " bounce " 
Ceese for fear of popular indignation among the pa- 
trons of the road, who might object to their safety 
being in the hands of a baboon. 

♦ 4> ♦ 
YEAR-OLD ICE CREAM. 



The leading manufacturer of ice cream said recent- 
ly, " Now, this is patented." He exhibited a cream 
brick. " Not the size or shape, nor the way it was 
made, but the way of doing it up. All of us manu- 
facturers used to pay a royalty for the privilege of 
wrapping this lump of cream in white paper anc" 
refreezing it, or, as we say, superfreezing it. I can 
put the brick away for a year, and at the end of that 
time it will be as good as it is now, except that the 
flavor will not be quite so perfect. This is the way we 
do up ocean steamship supplies. You know the 
liners take cream enough at this end to last the round 
trip. Can't afford to stock up with it on the other side, 
where it costs four times as much as it does here." 

■♦ * ■* 
THE TETANUS MYSTERY. 



Prof. Pietro Malatesta, of Naples has studied the 
phenomena of lockjaw in the crowded charity hospitals 
of his native city, and inclines to the opinion that mi- 
crobes have for once been slandered. They do not 
trouble patients who have been cut all to pieces 
in the dagger duellos of the Basso Porte (the Naples 
harbor and rowdy town), while a mere scratch often 
brings on the deadly spasm in a few hours. The truth 
seems to be that the special nerves react on those of the 



THR I NGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



61 



maxillary region, just as a blow on the head is resented 
by the digestive organs, or a whack on the jaw by the 
brain. 

BEES REMOVE DEAD. 



Over 100,000 honey bees were killed during the fire 
at the Eureka paper mills in Bridgeport, Conn., the 
other day. As soon as the smoke had rolled awav 
and the charred remnants of their homes had cooled 
the little insects, humanlike, set to work cleaning up. 

Apparently an ambulance corps was formed, number- 
nig .'Several hundred bees. These began getting out 
of the wav their dead comrades, many of them killed by 
stung firemen, and the way they worked suggested the 
work that must be going on daily on the Russio-Jap 
battlefields. Each bee tackled a dead one and strug- 
gled away with it, and as the field was strewn with 
thousands they have been employed the last few days. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
A RECORD BREAKER. 



The thousand mile walk of George H. Allen from 
Land's End to John O'Groats in seventeen days is a 
wonderful achievement. A vegetarian, life-long ab- 
stainer, and non-smoker, he has done the walk in seven 
days' less time than it had previously been accom- 
plished. That was last year, by Dr. Deighton, his aver- 
age walk per day being 42 miles. In his first week 
Allen averaged 45 miles per day, in his second week 
53, and in the last 63 miles per day; 177 miles were 
covered in the last two days. This progressive increase 
of pace and daily distance covered is a specially remark- 
able feature of the walk, and that the pedestrian finished 
his last day as fresh as when he left Land's End, and 
walking much faster. In the second week Allen cov- 
ered 48 miles more than in his first, and during the last 
five days considerably more than during the first six 
days, and nearly as far as during the second week of 
six days. It will be a long time surely before such a 
record will be beaten. 

♦ ♦ ♦ ' 
A GOOD HAIR OIL. 



I 



There are applications to make the hair shine, but 
they also make it oily. It is much better to apply some- 
thing which will not cause the hair to become greasy. 
Brushing three or four minutes with a brush that is 
not too stiff will make the hair glossy. So will a 
shampoo in warm water and plenty of soap. A good 
shampoo mixture to make the hair shine is made by 
dissolving a tablespoonful of shaved castile soap in 
half a cupful of hot water. Add a teaspoonful of 
borax and about a third of a teaspoon of 
bicarbonate of soda. Scrub into the hair and rinse 
off with man}- waters. In the last water put a table- 



spoonful of powdered borax to a basin of water. The 
hair, to be glossy, must be dried and dried again. Then 
it must be shaken in the air and brushed until it is 
glossy. That is the way to produce the glossy locks 
that are so much liked. 

* * 4* 

EBONY AND SILVER RAILWAYS. 



The rails of the Mexican Gulf Railway are laid on 
mahogany sleepers, and the bridges built of white 
marble. In West Mexico is a: line with ebony sleepers, 
and ballast of silver ore drawn from old mines beside 
the track. The engineers constructing these railways 
had no other material on the route, and found it cheap- 
er to use these seeming extravagances than to import 
the ordinary material. 

♦ ♦ 4* 

CHILBLAINS. 



A REMEDY very much recommended for this trouble- 
some complaint, and ofie found to be really efficacious 
is a tablespoonful of rriustard in a hand basin of warm 
water, in which the chilblains are bathed before re- 
tiring for the night. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Victor Hugo said, that " all thinkers, all poets, all 
producers of nobility of soul, must be translated, com- 
mented upon, printed, published, reprinted, stereo- 
typed, distributed, explained, recited, spread abroad, 
given to all, given cheaply, given at cost price." 

♦ * ♦ 

If you wish to rid your fowls of lice this season, 
take a small sewing machine oil can, fill it with coal oil, 
and put two or three drops on his or her head, neck 
and near the vent. You will be surprised to see how 
quick they disappear. — Australian Agriculturist. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Tender feet should be bathed nightly in a strong 
solution of rock salt. They should be dried and pow- 
dered with boric acid. The socks or stockings ought to 
be dipped in a hot saturated solution of this acid and 
be dried without wringing. ■ 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

There never did, and never will, exist anything per- 
manently noble and excellent in character which was 
a stranger to the exercise of resolute self-denial. — Wal- 
ter Scott. 

♦ * ♦ 

" Not in the clamor of the crowded street, 
Not in the shouts and plaudits of the throng, 
But in ourselves, are triumph and defeat." 

♦ ♦ ••> 

To be womanly is the greatest charm of woman. — • 
Gladstone. 



62 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905.. 



THE INGLENOOK 

A Weekly Magazine 

PUBLISHED BY 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription price, $1.00 per Annum, in Advance. 

E. HI. Cobb, Editor. 

The Ing-lenook contains twenty-four pages weekly, devoted 
to the intellectual, moral and spiritual interests of the young. 
Each department is especially designed to All its particular 
sphere in the home. 

Contributions are solicited. Articles submitted are adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine. A strong effort will 
be made to develop the latent talent of the constituency. 

Sample copies will be furnished upon application. Agents 
are wanted everywhere, and will be awarded a liberal ■ com- 
mission. Change of address can only be made when the old 
address, as well as the new, is given. Club rates for Sunday 
schools and other religious organizations. Address as above. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



A TWENTIETH CENTURY REFORMER. 



" I WAS born November 20, 1861, in County Cork, 
Ireland. I was dedicated to the Catholic priesthood 
at birth. I am a graduate of St. Finnbarr's College, 
Cork, and of St. Patrick's Theological Seminary, Car- 
low. I was ordained June 15, 1886. I became a 
priest of the Archdiocese of Chicago in 1896; and 
in 1900, with twenty- five brother priests, I entered 
upon a crusade against clerical drunkenness, grafting 
and immorality, which resulted in an uncanonical and 
invalid excommunication of me by the Papal Dele- 
gate, Cardinal Martinelli, which so-called excommun- 
ication, however, was withdrawn by him within two 
months. 

" I became a naturalized citizen of the United 
States in 1901. I am now a priest of the Archdio- 
cese of Chicago, and intend to remain so. In the 
Catholic Church I was born; in the Catholic Church 
I have lived; in the Catholic Church I will die. 

" I have written and published a book to redeem 
the Catholic Church in America from destruction; to 
deliver the Catholic people from the control of cor- 
rupt priests and prelates, and save the American 
public school." 

The above are the words of the Rev. Jeremiah 
J. Crowley, who is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese 
of Chicago, who is attempting a reformation among 
his people. 

Those who are intimately acquainted with Father 
Crowley, and those who have heard him speak, or 
have seen his book, will be convinced of the fact that 
he has undertaken this great work of reformation 
because of his great love for his mother church. He 
firmly believes that he was dedicated to the priesthood 
at birth, and that God sent him to America to save 
the Catholic Church from clerical drunkenness, graft- 
ing and immorality. 

One thing is sure. Father Croivley, to-day, is the 
best knozvn Catholic in America. How well he will 



succeed in renovating ecclesiastical circles is written 
in a sealed book which will be opened in the next few 
weeks. 

In all cases of reformation it is a difficult matter 
to lead people from darkness into light, because in 
the majority of cases, the light blinds them and they 
flee from the rays rather than get their spiritual eyes 
trained to stand the strong powers of illumination. 

Father Crowley has dedicated his book, just pub- 
lished, to the emancipated Catholic laity of to-morrow. 
If the Catholic laity can be made to see the benighted 
thralldom, into which they have been thrown by con- 
ditions prevalent, the majority of them will rejoice 
at the opportunity of liberation. Any religious body, 
whether Catholic or Protestant, ought to be truly hap- 
py in any attempt at development along lines of spir- 
itual and true sanctification. When anarchists make 
threats against the government to which they belong, 
when soldiers turn traitor to the army, when back- 
sliders arraign the church, her mission and her ordi- 
nances, it becomes strikingly evident that such a war- 
fare is waged because of prejudice, ill-will, malice 
and envy; but when a patriot, who rises above his 
fellows as did our forefathers, demands freedom, " a 
government by the people and for the people," or when 
a reformer like a Luther stands with his fortune and 
his life for the sanctity of the church and pleads in 
her behalf and seals his life-work with his blood, — 
when such a one shows his loyalty and love and pro- 
tects her from sin and evil, from within and without 
to the extent of his ability, it may be well said, " He 
hath done what he could." 

In his book, Father Crowley arraigns the parochial 
school and gives an array of startling facts concern- 
ing officers, teachers, curriculum, methods, and aims 
of the said institution, and goes so far as to show 
that in its character it is irreligious. He spares no 
words in giving an appalling account of priestly graft, 
drunkenness, immorality, sacrilege and crime. 

If the statements be true, and they ought to be from 
one who stands in position to know, that the average 
Catholic rector of a medium sized city parish has a 
larger income than the President of the United States, 
it is time that the common people of the Catholic 
Church know how they are being robbed by their 
superiors. It is too bad that so much money is so cheer- 
fully given and with such good intent, to be squan- 
dered in such an illegal and sacrilegious manner. He 
states that the Catholic hierarchy, not the Catholic 
laity, is bent upon destroying the American public 
schools, that the Vatican is hostile to the fundamental 
principles of American government and is attempt- 
ing to establish diplomatic relations with the govern- 
ment of the United States. 

Father Crowley is the exonerated priest of the great 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



63 



Chicago scandal of four years ago. He is philan- 
thropic; many of his friends wanted him to ask much 
more money for the book, but he said, " Remember the 
oppressed poor." 

It is hoped that the attempted reformation will re- 
sult in much good for the purity of the Catholic 
Church, for tlie maintenance and endorsement of the 
American government, and be an impetus to Chris- 
tianity at large. It might be well for protestant 
churches to follow this example of our Catholic broth- 
er and clean house too. 

<. .> .}. 

VERSATILITY. 



It seems to be an acknowledg'ed fact that the Amer- 
ican people are more or less versatile. P. T. Barnum 
once said, " American people like to be humbugged," 
which is evidently correct according to statistics. Per- 
haps in no other country in the world do we find such 
a tendency for people to change religious views, and 
one year be found communicant of one church organ- 
ization and the next year of another. Even men and 
women of the same religious organization are con- 
tinually changing views. That peculiar fixed con- 
stancy of the Orientals is sadly wanting. 

Men of science who were authorities yesterday will 
be obsolete to-morrow. Politicians have to be polled 
to ascertain, with any degree of certainty, the vote of 
a township and a county. It is possible for one to 
sit down and make a catalogue of many of his friends, 
who, to his knowledge, have changed occupations 
several times during their lifetime. 

As a matter of fact, conditions modify somewhat, 
but generally speaking the versatility of the American 
people is responsible for the most part of the above- 
named conditions. Should the question arise in your 
mind whence all this changeableness and fallibility 
comes, remember that we are cosmopolitan and con- 
tributors to our basket of characteristics come from all 
parts of the globe. 

The loyal sons from the Celtic Isle fill us with ftm, 
frolic and fright; we have received from them polite- 
ness, poetry, romance, and patriotism. Many of the 
witticisms of the speech and press to-day can be traced 
to veins that carry Celtic blood. 

From our Hebrew brethren, we are proud to say, 
we have gained that religious tenacity that is found 
nowhere else in the world. Their family devotion is 
truly commeiidable. They should be commended for 
their tireless industry and their eternal spirit of re- 
bellion against wrong. Despondency is almost un- 
known among them, because they are generally opti- 
mists, backed with a great deal of courage. Their abil- 
ity as financiers and economists make them world re- 
nowned. 

From old Germany have come the men who have 



brought to us definite thought, purpose, persistent ef- 
fort, stability, economy, literature, and scientific re- 
search. Although the German language has been re- 
duced to vulgarity through dialectic adulterations, yet 
their literature has done much to raise the standard of 
our own. The vast opportunities of broad America, 
to gain wealth, have not spoiled the German as an 
economist. He still retains his ability and privilege 
to keep what he has. The characteristics of firmness 
and stability have at times become, so promnient as 
to be called by their rivals, stubbornness, but should 
not be considered so. 

From the men of the French republic we have 
borrowed conception of thought, mental activity, logic, 
and thoroughly applied systems of self-government. 
There seems to be a genuine feeling of equality among 
the French that is admirable. They are not only 
neighbors as a nation, but as a rule make good neigh- 
bors wherever they go. They have added much to the 
social side of American life. 

From the peninsula of Scandinavia come some of 
the finest specimens of physical manhood and wo- 
manhood that ever landed on our shores. While in 
the majority of cases the Swedes and Danes have 
been poor upon their arrival on free soil, yet they 
compose that plodding, conservative, industrious, re- 
liable class of farmers and artisans of various kinds. 
They are a home-loving people of the most polite and 
hospitable kind. Courtesy and etiquette reign su- 
preme in Scandinavia, and what they have contributed 
in this way to America is of much intrinsic worth. 

From the Highlands of Scotland the echo of the 
bagpipe claims that part of our cosmopolitan com- 
position, which predominates honest, vigorous, reli- 
gious people of strong constitutions of body and mind, 
who are brusque, irascible, and who endeavor to rear 
conscientiously a patriotic and God-fearing family. 

From sunny Italy, we have such men as Columbus, 
Michael Angelo, Dante, Garibaldi, and others who 
have brought to us magnificent qualities which our 
ignorance too often derides. It is not to be wondered 
at that among so many donations there should be some 
gifts that we cannot or should not use. Of course 
there are views religious and political which cannot be 
endorsed by our public. And in spite of all the good 
things that have been brought, there have come some 
relics of barbarism, monarchy, scepticism, infidelity, 
Clan-na-gael, Mafia, and macaroni. 

Now, in view of the future American and his re- 
lation to the world and to his own country, what 
shall be the outcome of all this versatility? Shall we 
blame him for it? Nay, verily. Is there a remedy 
for it? Who knows? 

^ ♦ ♦ 

No reproof or demonstration is so potent as the si- 
lent influence of a good example. — Hosea Ballon. 



64 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



Cia.rrerxt :E3:a.2^pe3:i.ia::Lg^s 



BOSTON'S NEW TRANSIT TUBE. 



The new one-mile tunnel under Boston's harbor, 
connecting East Boston with the mainland for street 
car service, which was opened to the public last week, 
is the first tunnel of its kind to cross an open 'harbor. 
The tube contains two tracks equipped for overhead 
trolley service, which is employed on the Boston Ele- 
vated railway. , It is twenty-four feet wide and t-yven- 
ty-two feet from floor to roof. Its walls and arches 
are constructed entirely of concrete. It took about 
four and a half years to complete the work at a co^t 
of $3,000,000. It is now claimed that one may travel 
further and more comfortably for a nickel in Boston 
than in any other city in the world. The depth of the 
tunnel may be judged from the fact that the minimum 
of earth over it will be about five feet after the har- 
bor is dredged to forty feet depth. The tunnel is 
thoroughly ventilated by means of a duct that runs 
through the upper part of the bore connected with 
electric fans. In addition to the regular fare, pas- 
sengers must pay a toll of one cent, which the coin- 
■pany collects for the city. The running time through 
the tunnel will average six or seven minutes, a saving 
of from twenty to twent3f-five minutes over the ferry 

system. 

<♦ ♦ ♦ 

An attempt was made to destroy, by use of dyna- 
mite, the. statue of Frederick the Great, at Washing- 
ton, D. C., Jan. 10. The statue was a gift of Emper- 
or William to the American government as a mark 
of his appreciation of the official and personal cour- 
tesy shown his brother. Prince Henry of Prussia, 
during the latter's visit to this country in 1902. 

ij> hJ« <j> 

The Union Pacific Railroad has installed, on the 
Kansas-Nebraska branch, some gasoline motor cars 
which are supposed to cover sixty miles an hour with 
only the expense of a motorman and conductor. 

♦ ♦ ♦■ 

Two of the ten thousand horse power turbines at 
Niagara Falls, recently constructed, were set in mo- 
tion last week which marks an' era in the electrical 
development. These turbines and dynamos are the 
largest in the world. Each machine developed twelve 
thousand volts without a hitch. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

England denies that they will annex the Tonga Is- 
lands, but reports from Melbourne, Australia, say that 
she has already control of the legal and financial af- 
fairs of the island and that the native chiefs have con- 
sented. 



The Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul railway is in- 
stalling observation cars which have compartments 
especiall}^ for women, where they are not subjected to 
fight their way through volumes of tobacco smoke, and 
where uncultured men do not occupy one seat with an 
overcoat and another one in the smoker themselves. 
This railroad is to be complimented. 
♦I* ^ ♦J* 

News has reached the press from Rosebud, Mon- 
tana, saying that the Indians are in a destitute con- 
dition. An order was, received there to issue no food 
to them, except the very young and very aged, on the 
theory that they were self-sustaining and that they 
would not work, but the facts are that the Cheyennes 
are willing workers but that no work was furnished 
them to do. Complaints have reached the Secretary 
of Interior, who proposes to see that matters are prop- 
erly adjusted. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

In the jute mills at Chelsea, N. Y., a panic was 
caused by the explosion of a cylinder which killed the 
engineer and injured his assistant. About twelve hun- 
dred men and women were injured, more or less, in 
trying to escape. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Greece will have a new chamber of deputies in the 
near future. 

♦ <?• ♦ 

A Mr. Donald Murray, of England, has been oper- 
ating a telegraphic instrtmient between London and 
Edinburgh, through the kindness of the postal depart- 
ment, as a matter of experiment for the last twelve 
months. It is said that he has a sort of typewriter 
attachment that will transmit and receive without any 
knowledge of the dot and dash, and that the telegraph 
operator will have no use for pencil, just the knowledge 
of the typewriter keyboard. 

<•• ♦> <•• 

Judge Walker has decided that Chicago is not 
liable for the loss of life in the Iroquois fire. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Thirty-seven bank failures and ten sui. '"' on 
account thereof is the record Iowa made in lor 

♦ <* ♦ 

The oldest dormitory on the college campus at Har- 
vard, was damaged by fire to the extent of six thou- 
sand dollars, recently. 

♦ ♦ * 

A POWDER mill explosion at Halifax did twenty-five 
thousand dollars worth of damage. No lives were 
lost. 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



65 



A MOVEJtENT is on foot to explore and excavate tlie 
ancient city of Herculaneum. President Roose- 
velt and a few of his friends at the White House, 
the other evening, listeped to a lecture by Prof. 
Charles E. Waldestein of Cambridge, England, who 
is seeking international cooperation in the work. 
Tt may be interesting to lift olu Flerculaneum to view 
and science may be benefited by the undertaking; but 
surely society would be benefited if that, money would 
be spent on extrication of some of our cities which 
are not covered up with lava and ashes, but with crime, 
riot, drunkenness and Sabbath desecration. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

President Roosevelt and a number of clergymen 
in Washington city have begun a movement to estab- 
lish some form of corporal punishment to be inflicted 
upon wife-beaters. 

4> ♦ ♦ 

Desperadoes stopped a passenger train near Valley 
Springs, South Dakota, shot the cars full of holes, and 
ransacked the pockets of passengers, who calmly al- 
lowed them to proceed in the good work. 

4» ^ <• 

John C. Barkley of the Western Union Telegraph 
Company has made public the announcement that 
messages hereafter will be sent by the operator of an 
ordinary standard typewriter keyboard. The device 
has been worked on wire from New York to Buffalo 
fpr a week or more, and after a severe test has been 
pronounced thoroughly successful. The Professor 
.claims that this new invention will put the Morse 
system out of business. The new system will give 
greater accurac)' and speed, besides relieving the oper- 
ator of the long, tedious task of learning to transmit 
and receive by the dot and dash method. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

' Policemen in Philadelphia were obliged to protect 
themselves with revolvers against the assault of a 
crowd of Italians who were interfering with the duty 
of the policemen. 

♦ * '!> 

A NEW magazine is about to be put on the market ; 
it is to be called " Tom Watson's Magazine." It will 
be a monthly. Mr. Watson was the late candidate on 
the DP'- !e's party ticket for the presidential chair. 

^^ ^ ^ 
nowhere eisc 

truly cor^Tip- physicians, accompanied by several 
i^.iier men and women, sailed for Panama Dec. 27, to 
participate in the Panama medical congress which was 
to hold its fourth meeting in Panama Jan. 3, 1905. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The army and navy get a support of ninety-seven 
millions while congress favors agriculture with the 
magnificent sum of six millions. 



Some blood-tliii-sty villain of the rottenest type has 
thrice assaulted Mrs. Henry Hower, of North Man- 
chester, Ind., since Nov. 5. Some arrests have been 
made and some alibis proven. No one can guess 
the object of the intruder, since Mrs. Hovver's charac- 
ter is far beyond question and always has been. Be- 
sides, though the family is in fair circumstances, they 
are not sufficiently wealthy to be an object of black- 
mail. It is purely the work of the evil one, and the 
good citizens of the city and the law should spare no 
means to see that he is properly taken care of. It 
is time for justice to interfere when honest, well-mean- 
ing people are not safe in their own homes. 
♦J* ♦$* ^ 

Five hundred and fifty, out of seven hundred steer- 
age passengers, that arrived last week in New York, 
were Russians. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Four convicts of the California state prison, were 
shot by the guards while trying to make their escape. 

♦ * •> 

Three men were killed and three injured badly in 
a collision of two ice boats on Lake Onondaga, New 
York. 

♦ ♦ ♦• 

New York and vicinity has received, so far, this 
year, twenty-nine inches of snow. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

President Roosevelt is seriously considering the 
smoke nuisance in the city of Washington. It is to 
be hoped that success will crown his efforts to over- 
throw this deadly evil and that it will benefit the en- 
tire population. Many other still greater nuisances 
need most careful consideration. 

•i* ♦ ♦ 
Captain Christian Jensen, of the Silicon, recent- 
ly returned to Philadelphia from Ivigtut Bay, Green- 
land. He brings with him some strange and interest- 
ing news. While visiting a camp of Eskimos and 
Danes at Arsuck, which is about ten miles from Ivig- 
tut Bay, he had the privilege of meeeting a company 
of men who were not only strangers to him but strang- 
ers to the people of the camp, as well. They are cop- 
per colored, and are seven, eight and nine feet tall; 
their features strikingly resemble the American In- 
dians. They cannot speak the language of the Eskimos 
or the Danes, but they made their wants known by 
signs and pantomimes. The Eskimos claim that their 
forefathers have handed down a tradition that there 
were such a people in the interior of the island, but 
this idea had almost become legendary and mythical. 
They succeeded in making Captain Jensen understand 
that they had been driven from their homes in the 
interior by a series of terrible storms and cyclones. 
Our scientists now have a new field in which to labor. 



66 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




Deeds of great men but remind us 

That we need not scrimp and save 
To accumulate a fortune 

And go straightway to the grave; 
But to go at once to Congress, 

Then with prudence and with care 
Make our salary and mileage 

Bring us out a millionaire. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
A LETTER. 



Dear Sisters: — 

I enjoy reading the many useful and instructive things 
which we all find in our much loved magazine, the 
Inglenook, and lately we have had quite a number of 
papers referring to our manner of doing our work, which 
has been very helpful, and an idea occurred to me that al- 
though all of us cannot have model kitchens, or model 
houses, we can make them models of neatness and order. 
There are some things that stamp us as good housekeepers 
of which I shall mention a few; the appearance of our kit- 
chen and sleeping rooms most of all. Although our kitch- 
en, especially during the busiest season of the year, if 
space is limited, cannot always be orderly, it can be clean. 
We should arrange shelves, nails and hooks in such a 
manner as to have everything within reach and yet off 
the floor or work table. We should always wash our 
dishes as soon as they are removed from the table, or we 
are done using them, if baking; to do this saves time and 
much confusion, for if allowed to stand they become 
dry and are more difficult to wash, and are always in our 
way if we wish to perform almost any other kitchen work. 
Each housekeeper should determine the manner of wash- 
ing them for herself; my way is, to thoroughly rinse the 
milk, doughy or fruit dishes in cold water; and the 
greasy ones in hot water before beginning to wash them. 
I then take plenty of good hot soft water, or if that is 
not available a cleansed water made by taking one tea-cup 
of strong wood lye to every five quarts of water; first 
wash the silverware, or even the steel knives and forks, 
if those are used, and rinse and wipe. Now I would put 
in my soap, (as I do not think that it is any more filthy 
than any of the other manufactured productions, which 
are not any of them too clean if we could see their pro- 
duction. I prefer the soft soap that is homemade). I 
wash the glassware, rinse and wipe; then the china dishes, 
cleanest ones first; the tin and ironware. I give them all 
a good thorough rinsing with hot water. I know some 
folks say that this rinsing in hot water crackles the dishes 
but I know that it will not as my mother has dishes she 
has had for twenty-eight years that are not crackled and 
she has always scalded them. Care should be taken 
to pour the water over the dishes and not into them alone, 
as it may break the most delicate of them, especially if 
there is a cold draft of air in the room; but I believe that 
our dishes should always be thoroughly rinsed, although 
people who do not use soap seldom, if ever do. After 
the dishes, the cupboards and shelves, if there are any. 



should receive attention. They should be kept free from 
crumbs, dust, small particles of food stored away for use, 
but seldom touched again until thrown away, and all other 
refuse which should be immediately carried away to the 
pigs or chickens, or if there is nothing to feed it to, it 
should "be burned or buried. If oilcloth is used for the 
shelves and work tables it will save a great deal of work 
and is very easily cleaned with luke warm water and a 
little sweet milk. The stove should be kept free from dust, 
grease, or dough. If you prefer to keep it blacked as I do, 
for it stays like new so much longer; do not wash it, but 
scratch all particles of food oS of it with a sharp knife, 
take a small cloth which you have for that purpose wet it 
in kerosene and wipe over all grease spots; then brush 
with an old broom, a stiff paper, an old felt hat or a brush 
if you have one. No matter whether you wash it or do 
this it should always be done after each meal. The 
windows should be kept clean and bright and I prefer to 
have the kitchen windows unshaded and allowed to be 
open whenever possible so as to have a bounteous supply 
of pure air and sunshine. The floors should be scrubbed 
once or twice a week if bare, but for those who can afford 
it linoleum is both cheap and an ornament besides saving 
a great deal of hard work. The washing should be done 
regularly every week, but each housekeeper should decide 
how to do it herself; anyway that she can and keep her 
clothes white, sweet and clean. As for the ironing some 
can be omitted if necessary, such as sheets, pillow case^ 
towels, dish towels, etc., although I prefer to iron them if 
I possibly can so that in case of accident everything will 
be in good shape to use but anyone cannot be called untidy 
if they do omit these things, and it is better , to omit these 
things than the little boy's and girl's everyday clothes. I 
think they should be be ironed anyway. If they are made 
plain they can be ironed double and look very nice, and 
good enough to wear anywhere, and then it teaches them 
to be just as neat and tidy at home as elsewhere, where if 
they are not ironed they are not fit to wear away 
from home, and the little ones soon begin to think that 
anything is good enough for home wear. So much for 
the kitchen work. The sleeping rooms should contain on- 
ly necessary furniture, although some have papered walls; 
I prefer whitewashed ones, as the paper collects so much 
dust and poison which contains germs of disease, while 
the whitewash is antiseptic in itself and is more often 
cleaned. I do not think it necessary to allow the beds to 
go unmade all day long if the inner bedding is changed 
every week, and as soon as its occupants have left it in 
the morning, the covering is removed and the mattress or 
tick is given a thorough shaking or pounding and then al- 
lowed to lay open until the other morning work is com- 
pleted. The windows should be opened both top and 
bottom if possible and allowed to remain open during the 
entire day in summer, and in winter also if possible, and if 
not, a portion of the time at least, so that there will be a 
free circulation of air, and at night I allow it to remain 
partially open. If one is inclined to keep the kitchen and 
sleeping rooms neat the other rooms are seldom in dis- 
order; but sometimes it is vice versa and this should not be 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



67 



so for the most of our time is spent in those rooms and 
they should have a congenial atmosphere tended to raise 
us above the work there confined; and in one our food is 
prepared, vifhile in the other our strength and vitality is 
recruited. Neither should we have any rooms, or any- 
thing in them that is too good for use; nor a set time to 
use them as Sundays, holidays, or when company comes, 
but anyone should be at liberty to use them at any time, 
but everyone should be taught to be careful not by scold- 
ing but by kindness and example. Now, I think I hear 
some one say, "Oh, those dreadful boys! We never can 
have anything neat and tidy with those boys around." I 
disagree with you. One can have things just as neat and 
tidy if the boys are given a share in the neatness and 
tidy arrangements in their own rooms, and are made to 
feel that they are partly responsible for the neat and 
attractive appearance of their home. Do not have so many 
useless things, such as tidies, fancy pillows, sundry pieces 
of odd china, etc., laying around for ornament; a few 
tidies, cushions and rugs are all right if made for use, but 
those which cannot be used by any member of the family 
have no place there and had better be thrown into the 
fire, for they are but the source of a constant annoyance 
to them, and no end of worrying, scolding and remon- 
strances to you, oftimes causing family quarrels, and is 
what drives so many boys and men away from their homes 
to- low associates and the saloons for rest and entertain- 
ment. Are not our boys and husbands of more conse- 
quence than these useless things? We can teach our 
boys to so love home and its little attractions 
there, that they will be just as neat and tidy; 
just as careful of the nice things as the girls, 
and sometimes more so; and we should remember 
that careful boys make careful men, and that they will 
some day be some girl's husband, and can we bear to hear 
our son's wife say, "Oh, dear! my husband is so care- 
less!" when we might have taught them better? We 
should not think that husband or children cannot do any- 
thing good enough for us, but should enlist their services 
whenever we can. Do not think that perhaps you can do it 
quicker and better than the children and so neglect to 
teach them until they are grown and beyond your control; 
for if you do, after they have entered life's path with its 
many struggles and discouragements, they will look back 
and blame you for that neglect and who can blame them? 
Can you? (I can't and I speak from experience.) As 
soon as their little hands are big enough give them each 
day some set work to do, such as carrying wood or water, 
setting the table, washing dishes, sweeping the floor, 
making their own beds, paring potatoes or apples, getting 
vegetables from the garden and preparing them, picking 
berries, stemming strawberries, weeding the garden, iron- 
ing the small common articles, small chores outside for 
papa, sewing on buttons, making button holes, piecing 
quilts and all other plain hand sewing. You will be sur- 
prised how young they can do these things and not hurt 
them either. I do not approve of overworking them but 
if they work part of the time it makes them more con- 
tented and happy, less liable to get into mischief, and they 
have more zeal for their play. Then again, if there is 
any part of your work which you can slight and not be a 
detriment to the sweetness and purity of your house do so, 
rather than remain away from church or Sunday school, 
or rob yourself of a chance to read so that you may be an 
interested companion to your husband, able to converse 



upon all current topics intelligently. You can then instruct 
and amuse the children so that they will look to mamma 
as their best playmate. They would rather work and help 
you quite a little and have you play with them than to play 
all of the time and alone. Now, sisters, although all ad- 
mire neat and model housekeepers, we should not be too 
critical of each other's efforts as we cannot always see into 
our sister's life, see her trials and difficulties, she may not 
be as neat as some but she may have too much to do, too 
many to do for; she may have ill-health, or she may have 
careless and inefficient help and not many conveniences. 
These things a casual observer will not notice but if she 
looks neat and tidy, sets a neat, tastily arranged table, al- 
lows plenty of pure air and sunshine to invade the house 
and is pleasant and cheerful, we must excuse any little 
minor points which it takes to make a good housekeeper, 
and think, " She does her best," that is all any of us can 
do. Good-bye. From a sister who wishes everyone well. 

Lottie Bollinger. 
Vestaburg, Mich. 

■* * * 

DON'T BITE THREAD. 



A PRACTICING dentist says this is the season of the 
year when his business is given a slight boom by the 
women who bite their threads. Only professional 
dressmakers and seamstresses may be relied upon to 
eschew this practice, and all other women who make 
any of their own clothes are more or less addicted 
to it. 

The incisors are used for the purpose, but it makes 
the edges of several of the front teeth as uneven as 
a saw, and at a time, as now, when there is much 
sewing on summer dresses, produces a state of affairs 
that no dentist can remedy with any satisfaction to 
himself or his patrons, so that the boom is nowhere 
welcomed. Most women when shown the evil effects 
of threadbiting are horrified and make all sorts of 
promises of reform, but nearly all of them are back- 
sliders. 

.J* 4* .^ 

DOMESTIC EXTRAVAGANCE. 



Domestic extravagance has, we are told, reached a 
limit, and a reaction has set in. Common sense is re- 
suming its sway. Women, even more than men, are 
beginning to look toward a simpler life. We are 
all beginning to realize that it is not the money we 
spend which brings satisfaction, but what we get 
for it. 

It would be well if families, as well as individuals 
and corporations, were to begin the new year by a 
thorough inquiry into their financial condition and 
prospects. A searching analysis of this kind, set down 
in black and white, would be edifying to many a hus- 
band and wife, and, in most cases, would not fail to 
simplify their method of living and consequently add 
to their happiness. 



68 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»<♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 



H Reading Circle and Christian Workers' Topics I 



. . By E^IZABHTS D. BOSEMBEBGEB 

♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ . ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»»»»»»» 



PHILIP.— Acts 8:26-31. 



Sunday Evening, January 29. 



I. Philip Going. 

(a) 1. From Samaria — Many People, Acts 8: 25 

2. To Desert Road— To One Person,. .Acts 8:26 

(b) 1. Following Leading of Spirit, Acts 8:29 

2. Paul at Troas, Acts 16:9 

3. Spirit Directs all Missions for Christ,, 

John 16:8, 14 

4. Joy in Preaching Christ, ..... .1 Thess. 2: 19, 20 

II. The Eunuch. 

(a) 1. Going to Jerusalem to Worship,. .. .Acts 8:27 

2. Reading the Bible, Acts 8: 28 

3. Seeking to Understand, Acts 8: 30, 31 



(b) 1. Was Taught the Way, Acts 8 

2. Obeyed — Was Baptized, Acts 8 

3. Joy in Accepting Christ, Acts 8 

III. Individual Work for Individuals. 



32 
38 
39 



Text. — And he said. How can I, except some man 
should guide me? And he desired Philip that he would 
come up and sit with him. Acts 8:31; Acts 8:26-40. 

References. 

Ruth 1:16; Acts 10; Acts 13:43; Acts 16:14,15; 
Acts 16:27-34; Acts 17:4-12; Matthew 13:4-19; 
Luke 8:4-15; 2 Peter 3: 14; Jude 3:20; Revelations 
22: 17; I Peter 4:11. 

The Angel's Message to Philip. 

" And the angel of the Lord spake unto Philip say- 
ing. Arise, and go toward the south unto the way 
that goeth down from Jerusalem unto Gaza, which is 
desert ; " this was surely a strange messenger with 
an obscure message. The angel told him to go 
away from Jerusalem, where there were other 
disciples and many advantages, go south toward 
Gaza, and he would find himself on a road that passed 
through a desert; it was a discouraging outlook. 
There were no disciples there, there were few people, 
it would seem as if Philip would better remain in the 
villages and preach Jesus to the natives. But Philip 
never questioned, or even reasoned about the matter, 
we are only told that " he arose and went." And 
so when the Ethiopian came by, reading the prophet 
Esaias, the Spirit said unto Philip, " Go near, and 
join thyself to this chariot ; " and we are told that 
Philip ran to join him, and then they talked about 
the Scriptures. You and I would have been more 
ready to obey a command directing us to go from 
the desert way up to Jerusalem, because we work for 



results, and we like a promising field. Let us be guid- 
ed by the Holy Spirit, and go wherever he wants us to 
go- 
He Invited Philip to Sit with Him. 

The Ethiopian had come to a hard place in his 
reading, he could not understand the text, and he 
evidently believed that Philip could explain it. More 
than that he must have had a degree of personal lik- 
ing for Philip, or he would not have asked him to sit 
in the chariot, it was easy to help him: then, it is al- 
ways easy to teach Jesus when the teacher is lovable 
and makes a good impression on those whom he would 
teach. It would be a difficult matter to lead a man 
to Christ, if he always crossed the street to avoid 
meeting you or speaking to you. Whittier tells us, — 

" The dear Lord's best interpreters 
Are humble human souls. 
The gospel of a life 

Is more than books or scrolls." 

The Desert Way. 

I do not believe that Philip was lonely, as he went 
down this way unto Gaza, he had time for personal 
communion with Christ. Men cannot stand in the 
Lord's house to speak his words unto the people unless 
they have first waited at Christ's feet to get their mes- 
sage. Our lips must be touched with a coal from 
God's altar before we can become God's messengers 
to men. A special feature of the daily life in Wel- 
lesly college is the morning and evening " silent time," 
marked by the strokes of the bell in which all the house 
is quiet. Every pupil is in her room, there is no con- 
versation, and it is understood that all whose hearts 
so incline them shall spend the time in meditation and 
prayer. One of the greatest needs in Christian life 
in these days is more devotion. Philip's silent walk 
on the desert road left him ready to teach Jesus so 
truthfully that the convert was eager to be baptized 
at once. 

Incomplete Directions. 

We could not have blamed Philip if he had asked the 
angel what he was to do on this road that went to, 
Gaza, the angel gave no hint of any souls to save there. 
But Philip had learned the lesson that one step at a 
time is all that God leads. We wonder why God does 
not make our future duty plain to us. A young 
school-girl is perplexed: — ought she to go to a for- 
eign mission field, or devote herself to work at home? 
It will take her at least from three to five years yet 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



69 



to complete her course at school. It is very clear 
then that her present duty is to go to school, what 
her ultimate mission in this world will be, God will 
show her in due time, just as he showed Philip. 

"A single stitch in an endless web, 
A drop in the ocean's flow and ebb! 
But the pattern is rent where the stitch is lost. 
Or marred where the tangled thread-s have crossed; 
And each life that fails of its true intent 
Mars the perfect plan that the Master meant." 

He Preached in All the Cities. 

We find this said of him, after baptizing- the Ethi- 
opian, he left the desert way and went to Azotus, 
then he preached in all the cities till he came to C«s- 
area. There was a difference; he preached to many 
people in these cities, yet he was God's messenger 
just as truly when he was walking alone to teach and 
baptize but one convert. 

" If thou hast yesterday thy duty done, 

And thereby cleared firm footing for to-day, 
Whatever clouds may dark to-morrow's sun, 
Thou shalt not miss thy solitary way." 

Topics for Discussion. 

1. What message did the angel of the Lord bring to 
Peter? Acts 12: 7, 8. 

2. What promise did Jesus make in regard to the 
Spirit? John 15: 26; John 16: 13. 

3. What other man went out of his own country 
without knowing where the Lord was leading him? 
Genesis 12: 1-4. 

4. Relate some incidents in the life of Adoniram 
Judson which show his submission to God's guidance. 

5. Nam.e and relate some instances of missionaries 
who like Philip were directed by the Spirit. 

6. Jesus took the time to talk to individuals and 
teach them truth. John 4: 5-28. 

" Who would true valor see 
Let him come hither 
One here will constant be 

Come wind, come weather 
There's no discouragement 
Shall make him once relent 
His first avowed intent 
To be a pilgrim." 

How many births are past, I cannot tell; 

How many yet to come no man can say; 
But this alone I know, and know full well. 

That pain and grief embitter all the way. 
I — South India Folk Song. 

I have been in India twenty years, and if I had 
twenty lives to live I would give them all for India. 
There is no work which God has given to woman 
which exceeds in beauty and grandeur the work which 
is to be done by wom.en for the women of India.^ 
Mrs. J. C. Archibald. 



EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 



Brother D. Owen Cottrell, who used to be our sec- 
retary at North Manchester, Indiana, is now teaching 
at the Maryland Collegiate Institute, at Union Bridge, 
Maryland. As he was our secretary at North Man- 
chester, he could act in the capacity of local secretary, 
wherever he was located, provided there was work for 
him to do, and so we were made glad by a list of 
twenty-one new names from Union Bridge ; he says 
" We are having good meetings at present. We are 
reading " The Crisis of Missions," but will begin an- 
other book soon." 

At Waynesboro, Pa., the first Circle meeting was 
held about eleven years ago. Brother Wilbur Stover, 
Sister Elizabeth Howe and many others were willing 
workers there. And we are glad that the interest at 
that place still continues. Sister Sudie M. Wingert 
is their local secretary and she says, " We need some 
of the new circulars, we desire to do more Circle 
work." They have a " Girl's Mission Band " and 
" Sisters' Missionary Sewing Circle." The Mission- 
ary Visitor of May, 1904, has a record of their work. 

Brother John W. Vetter of Pyrmont, Indiana, says, 
" We have at last got our Circle organized with 
Merton j. Holsinger, as president, and for secretary 
and treasurer, myself. I send in two more names, 
and an order for five new books on missions. We are 
anxious to learn more about this work." 

Sister Amanda Rodabaugh from Daleville, Vir- 
ginia says, " We have organized a little Circle, and are 
enjoying it very much. We are reading ' Modern 
Apostles of Missionary Byways.' I enclose thirteen 
new names." 

Sister Mary E. Shickel of Broadway, Virginia, says, 
" I received my certificate ; it is only a piece of paper, 
but it means so much to me. The books are well se- 
lected and interesting, therefore I hope to continue 
reading and persuade others to do so too. We have 
organize a Christian Workers' meeting here, and we 
thank God and take courage." 
♦ ♦ * 
QUESTIONS. 



What do you know about Our Missionary Reading 
Circle ? 

Have you sent for new circulars? 

What is your Circle doing to help the missionaries ? 

How many books on missions will you read in 1905 ? 

Are 3'ou supporting an orphan? 

Do you have Christian Workers' meetings in your 
church ? 

Have you asked the Holy Spirit to guide and direct 
you and yours in this year ? 

Are your Sunday-school teachers members of the 
Circle ? ' ' ^, 



70 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 




OUR YOUNG PEOPLE f 



THE GEOGRAPHY CLASS.— Chapter XI. 



Dublin, Ireland. 
Dear Mr. Maxwell: — 

Since we wrote you we have had a little bad luck. 
When we were sight-seeing in the city of Cork the other 
evening, Miss Merritt either mislaid her purse or lost it 
which caused all of us more or less anxiety. Of course 
the boys advertised in the morning paper. It was a very 
easy matter to make a good description of it, for, besides 
a regular description that might be given any one's purse, 
it contained an indentification check, and besides it had 
some pieces of American money in it; and as you may well 
know, Gertrude had looked at those pieces of money so 
many times that she knew the date on every one of them. 

It might have been a serious thing, for you see it con- 
tained her American Express cheques, which, if lost, meant 
return for all of us, and just think of us having to give up 
this trip at the initial point. Of course the express cheques 
were perfectly safe; they were as worthless as paper until 
they were signed, but as a matter of fact it would have 
caused us some delay and trouble to have regained the 
amount. 

The next morning the doorbell rang and two big, burly 
policemen stood at the door and asked the porter if Miss 
Merritt from " Ameriky " was there. It was no trouble for 
Miss Gertrude to identify herself. With her American 
dialect, her American friends, and her American manner of 
approach, the policemen were easily convinced that she 
was the owner of the lost property. We all had the laugh 
on her when the policemen asked her how much money 
there were in the purse. She said, there was some sover- 
eigns, some crowns, half crowns, shillings and ha'pennies. 
Here the policemen took a big laugh and said: " Faith, 
and she's the roight gal; yez put me in moind uv th' Irish- 
man who measured a log fur a carpenter and sed it wuz 
thra times th' lingth of his tin-foot pole, besides sivin ex- 
tra fate, thra times th' lingth of his hammer handle, two 
spans and a little over." 

The real royal American blood rushed to the face of our 
little school mistress when she saw that the joke was on 
herself. The lost property was restored to her, with a 
bow and a smile, and when she offered them a shilling each 
for their kindness, they again smiled and refused because 
they said they had done nothing only what was their duty 
to do. 

I notice that the boys forgot to tell you in their letter 
that when we made our trip out to Blarney Castle, we 
passed Doctor Wood's Asylum for the Insane, a dairy 
school, and a soldiers' barracks. In one of these barracks 
were stationed three hundred cavalrymen and in another 
three regiments of infantry. It must be admitted that the 
British soldiers look well in their uniform. I can now un- 
derstand why our school histories often spoke of the 
English soldiers as the " red coats." Their coats were 
made of the very reddest of red, but they have miserable 
little caps that do not half cover their heads and furnish 
them no protection whatever, from sun or rain. There are 



fifty thousand of these troops kept annually by a tax levied 
upon the poor Irish, who have no more use for these 
soldiers than you have in Mayville. 

Near Blarney Castle is a large tweed factory, a ferti- 
lizer mill, a linen factory, and a schoolhouse. This tweed 
factory is one of the most renowned in the world. 

It seemed so queer all the time to see fields of mangels, 
turnips, oats, potatoes, and heather, but never a stalk of 
corn. The boys kept looking and watching all the time 
for corn, but they were not even favored with a glimpse. 
Rocks, crows, donkeys, stone walls, whitewashed concrete 
houses, dirty children, and lots of them, Johnny cars, 
laurel, elm, birch, and beautiful roads abound. Good 
horses like the one we are driving sell for about one hun- 
dred twenty dollars, and a Johnny car, like the one in the 
photograph that the boys sent, sells for about one hun- 
dred and forty dollars, or what they call here, twenty- 
eight pounds. 

When we went from Cork to Dublin, which is one hun- 
dred seventy-five miles, as near as we could tell, (for they 
have no miles, as we know them,) we had to change cars 
at Mallow. This is a junction of some note and quite a 
town. As we were ready to pull out of the station for the 
capital city, ten mute boys crowded into our coupe and 
you may be sure we had interesting company for the rest 
of the journey. They ranged from six to fifteen years of 
age. They were intelligent little fellows without exception, 
but were very poor. They were being sent to a govern- 
ment asylum where mutes are educated. It was a sad sight 
to see their mothers and sisters come down to the station 
to see them off. Not a man was present; no doubt they 
were about their daily labors. Each of these boys left 
home carrying a bottle of milk, a bit of dry bread and a 
small sack containing a scanty bit of clothing, of the poor- 
er sort. Angels and artists would have envied the picture 
when little brothers and sisters, both younger and older 
than themselves, would surround them and smother them 
with kisses and good-byes, entreating them not to forget 
to read their Bibles and pray. Each of them also had in 
their possession a few pennies which they frequently 
counted. 

You know Agnes knows how to talk on her fingers to 
people who are deaf and dumb, and using her for an in- 
terpreter, the boys became very much interested in our 
party and we in them: and we succeeded in getting much 
desirable information from them, as to the manners and 
customs of the people. It is astonishing to note the per 
cent of mutes in Ireland. We do not understand why 
this should be so. 

When we reached the great city of Dublin our ten little 
mute friends quickly disappeared amid the two hundred 
eighty-nine thousand souls of the capital of the Emerald 
Isle. Aiid we wondered, as they faded to view, what and 
where they would be twenty years hence. 

All day long we have been furnished some of nature's 
best scenery; the green hills, crystal loughs, ruined castles, 
(Continued on page 72.) 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



71 






When is Congress in session and who was chairman of 
the Senate Nov. 1, 1904? 

Each Congress has a life of two years, the same as 
the term of a Representative. The present or Fifty- 
eighth Congress began March 4, 1903, and will end 
March 4, 1905. As a rule, however. Congress is nev- 
er in session more than half of the time. It has two 
regular sessions, called the long and short one. The 
long session begins at noon on the first Monday of 
December in the odd years and continues until both 
Houses agree to adjournment, which occurs usually 
in the early part of the summer. The short session 
begins on the first Monday of the following Decem- 
ber, or in the even year, and continues until March 
4. Congress may adjourn sooner upon the agreement 
of both Houses, but this is never done. The Presi- 
dent can call an extra session by issuing a proclama- 
tion, naming the date and giving reasons for his ac- 
tion. Congress may also provide for an extra session 
by adjourning to a fixed date earlier than December. 
If thp two Houses can't agree as to the time of final 
adjournment the President may set the date. The 
presiding officer, or President pro tern of the Senate 
from March 4, 1903, to March 4, 1905, is WilHam P. 
Frye, of Maine. 

* 

What kind of ink is used on typewriter ribbons? How 
is it made and applied? 

Melt vaseline to high boiling point on a water 
bath or slow fire and add as much lampblack, con- 
stantly stirring it, as will take up without being gran- 
ular. Then remove it from the fire, and while it is 
cooling mix equal parts of petroleum, benzine and 
rectified oil of turpentine. To this mixture slowly 
add the fatty ink, constantly stirring it so as to dis- 
solve it. The fluid ink should be of the consistency 
of fresh oil paint. Wind the ribbon on a cardboard, 
and after spreading several layers of newspaper on 
a table unwind the ribbon in convenient lengths and 
lay it flat on the paper. Stir the ink well and apply 
to the ribbon with a soft brush. Then rub it in well 
with a tooth brush. 

* 

Please state what the word " Atahanam " is and where 
located. It is located somewhere in the world and I would 
like to know where? 

It is the name of a river in the state of Washington, 
a tributary of the Yakima. 

* 
What is the population of Alaska? 
It is 63,502. 



Who was the founder and first president of Harvard 
College? 

Harvard College, now Harvard University, the old- 
est institution of learning in the United States, was 
founded by act of the General Court of Massachusetts, 
granting 400 pounds toward a school or college, Oc- 
tober 28, 1630. The College was named after John 
Harvard, a graduate from Emmanuel College, Cam- 
bridge, England, who bequeathed his library and 
half his estate, about 700 pounds, for a college at his 
death at Charleston, Mass., Sept. 14, 1638. Cam- 
bridge, then Newton, was selected as the site for the 
college March 13, 1639. The first head was Na- 
thaniel Eaten, who was soon deposed for ill-treating 
and starving the students and beating his assistant, 
a Mr. Briscoe. He was succeeded by Rev. Henry 
Dunster, the first President of the college, who held 
the office from 1640 to October, 1654, when he was 
compelled to resign on the charge of disobeying the 
ordinance of infant baptism in the Cambridge Church. 
The school had acquired a high reputation under him. 
Charles W. Ellis has been President since 1869. 

* 

Assuming the President's wife to be the first lady in the 
land, who is the second lady at the present time? 

This is a disputed point on which equally accom- 
plished persons differ. In the book, " Etiquette of 
Social Life in Washington," Mrs. Madeleine Vinton 
Dahlgren says : " The second place is claimed for 
both the Chief Justice and the Vice President and so 
many good reasons may be given on either side that 
until a social Congress can be convened to decide this 
and some other controverted points, there can be no 
decision attained." Their wives should be respect- 
ively second and third lady. 

* 

What is the significance of the name "Inglenook"? 

We have answered this question before, but for the 
sake of the new members of our family, we answer it 
again. Literally, it means a cozy corner, and carries 
with it the significance of the family hearthstone. We 
apply it to our magazine because ours is a family mag- 
azine, and deals with the needs and wants of every 
department of the family circle. 

♦ 

How is flint formed? 

Some authorities say that flint is formed by petri- 
faction of fine sponges. When one studies the compo- 
sition of these simple animals this seems very prob- 
able. 



72 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 17, 1905. 



♦ • 



^1 
t - 



3n^isce; 



4> 




♦♦♦^^ » ■ ! ■ ■ : ■ » ■ ! ■ ' V ■ ! ■ ' t ' ' t ' ' t ' ■ ! ■ ■ ! ■ - t ' ' t - • : < »:< 't' t - 1 - 1 - • ! ■ ■ ! ■ > ! ■ ■ ! ■ ■! • 

* 
* 



THE GEOGRAPHY CLASS.— Chapter XI. 



(Continued from Page 70.) 
and the thatched-roofed, whitewashed country homes dot- 
ting the green hillside. 

No sooner had we found ourselves in a great crowd on 
the streets of Dublin, than our attention was called to a 
procession of one hundred boys in beautiful uniform. We 
were told that they were Foresters, celebrating in honor 
of O'Connell, the Liberator of Ireland. After we were lo- 
cated at our hotel, we took a little stroll on the street to 
get acquainted for the lay of the town and walk up and 
down the banks of the beautiful river Liflfey. On re- 
turning, strange to say, we met a Mr. Cullen, who is now a 
merchant in that city, but formerly owned a store in Phila- 
delphia. Of course he recognized us at once as Ameri- 
cans, and said that it would afford him pleasure to show >^s 
the city. As he was born and raised here, and as he is 
also acquainted with American customs, no doubt he will 
be in position to contrast things in a way which will be 
intensely interesting to us, and we look forward to to- 
morrow with a great deal of pleasure. 

I would give half a dollar for a pieo^ of Ma's good but- 
ter, as big as my fist. Respectfully; Marie. 
(To be continued.) 
'i' ♦ ♦ 
AMERICAN COTTON. 



The entire world produces 14,000,000 bales of cot- 
ton, of which the United States alone contributes 10, 
500,000 bales, or 75 per cent. Moreover, Americans 
are attempting, with activity and persistence, to mo- 
nopolize the consumption of the raw material which 
they produce, and to this end they multiply the spin- 
ning and weaving mills of their country, augment- 
ing the number of spindles and installing their fac- 
t6ries alongside the cotton fields. The consumption 
of American cotton in the United States grew 
from 2,287,000 bales in 1893 to 3,908,000 bales in 
1903, and the progress appears to have been much more 
rapid since then. 

* ♦ * 

WOMAN INVENTS GUN. 



A DENVER woman has devised a new shotgun, which 
is being manufactured. The inventor, Mrs. Nellie 
Bennett, says the new fowling piece is a decided im- 
provement over the old shotgun, effectiveness being 
combined with lightness and mechanical construction 
to a degree never before reached by gunsmiths. Mrs. 
Bennett enjoys the distinction of being the crack trap 



shooter of Colorado. While deer hunting on the 
North Platte in Nebraska recently she shot the largest 
specimen of pelican ever seen in that part of this coun- 
try. Mrs. Bennett is associated in business with the 
publication of a sportsman's magazine, issued in 
Denver. 

V V V 

THE DEVIL. 



We are told he does not go about like a roaring lion now; 
But whom shall we hold responsible for the everlasting 

row 
To be heard in home, in church and state, to the earth's 

remotest bound. 
If the Devil, by a unanimous vote, is nowhere to be 

found? 
Won't somebody step to the front forthwith, and make 

their bow and show 
How the frauds and the crimes of a single day spring up? 

We want to know. 
The Devil was fairly voted out, of course the Devil's 

gone; 
But simple people would like to know who carries his busi- 
ness on. 

■ — Australian Exchange. 

♦ * ♦ 
GAMBLING IN RUSSIA. 



The spirit of garnbling seems to dominate all classes 
in Russia. Recent official statistics show that more 
than 2,000,000 roubles (about $1,650,000) are each 
year spent on playing cards in the land of the czar. 

The monopoly of the manufacture of playing cards 
belongs to the Czaritza Maria charitable institutions, 
and an income of 1,700,000 roubles ($1,440,000) a year 
is procured, the cost of manufacture being only 300,000 
roubles ($250,000). 

\ •♦ 4* ♦ 

CURE FOR CORNS, 



Boil a potato in its skin, and after it is boiled, take 
the skin and put the inside of it to the corn, and leave 
it on for twelve hours. At the end of that time the corn 
will be much better. The above simple and useful 
recipe has been tried and found to be a perfect rem- 
edy. 

♦ * * 

Nothing we can do will please God, unless we are 
willing to have the same spirit that Christ had. — E. P. 
Brown. 



Good Land Cheap 



L/et us sell you farming land where the soil is pro- 
ductive and the crops dependable ; where we have no 
drouths or failures; where grasshoppers are not; where 
we have few storms and no destructive winds; where 
products are greatly diversified; where the markets are 
as good as they are easily reached; where the climate 
is uniform and salubrious; where you will be cordially 
welcomed and helped along. We state without fear of 
contradiction that we have the best land at the least 
money, possessing more advantages and fewer draw- 
backs, than can be found in this country to-day. A few 
years' time is all that is necessary to prove that we are 
in one of the most productive areas for fruit, root crops 
and live stock. The possibilities are here, largely un- 
developed as yet; all that we want is the people. Those 
we are getting are the right kind, your own kind, and 
the country will soon be dotted with green fields and 
cosy homes. Don't get the idea that you are going to a 
wilderness; not at all; on the contrary, we have sold 
lands in our BRETHREN COLONY to over 120 fam- 
ilies, nearly half of whom are already on the ground, 
In the vicinity of BRETHREN, MICHIGAN, we have 
thousands of acres of productive soil, splendidly adapted for fruit, root and vegetable 
crops and live stock, at prices from $7 per acre upwards, on easy terms. Our lands are 
sold to actual settlers. 




The basis ol my business is absolute and 
unvarying integrity. 

SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Founder of the Brethren Colony, Brethren, Mich. 



others coming next spring. 



BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, BRETHREN, MICH., 

is Resident Agent in charge of the work at our ] brethren Colony. It will only cost you a 
postal card to drop him a line for our illustrated booklet, entitled " The Brethren Colony 
in the Fruit Belt of Michigan." This will give you an accurate idea of the lands and all 
conditions surrounding them The booklet contains letters giving the opinion of many 
Brethren in regard to our lands and work. Every statement can be borne out by facts. 

Reduced rates will be furnished homeseekers desiring to look our country over and 
every opportunity will be accorded them to conduct their investigations satisfactorily 
by Bro. Miller on their arrival at Brethren, Michigan. 

For booklet, information as to rates and all details address: 



I 



SAMUEL S. THORPE, BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, 

Cadillac, Mich., "^^ Brethren, Mich., 

DISTRICT AQENT RESIDENT AGENT 



mm 




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Rheumatism, 
Kidney Trouble 



And all diseases originating from impure 

blood, quickly and permanently 

cured with 



Australian 
Life Tablets 

Mailed on lo days' Trial Free. 

Australian Life Tablets, remove the Uric 
Acid poison from the plasma of the blood. 

Of all the splendid remedies ever placed 
on the market, these " Tablets " have filled 
the greatest want. They are suited to all 
classes of people from children to adults. 
They spend their force in regulating the 
three great organs. Kidneys, Liver and 
Stomach. Put these three organs in good 
working order and the patient has little or 
nothing to complain of. 



oxjrt s IF* :e3 <D I .^ iL. orT^Esrt i 

I will mail any reader of the INGLENOOK a regular box, 30 days' treatment, on ten days' trial free. If it 
\ \ proves satisfactory, send me §1.00, if not, return the box, which will only cost you 2 cents postage and you will not owe 
\ J me a penny. 

'♦' 'J' 'V 'J' 'J' 'J' V' v V V V 'I' '♦' v 'I' V '♦* V 'X' 'i' V '♦' V V V V '♦' '♦' '♦' V V 'v >' >' '♦' 'J' v v '♦' '♦' v '♦' v '♦' v v 'I' '♦' 'I* V 'I* '♦* '- 



Australian Life Tablets contain only the active principles of pure medicine compounded from the best known 
herbs in the vegetable kingdom and contain no poisbn. Each box contains about double the medical value found 
in any dollar bottle of liquid medicine. All liquid patent medicines contain from 16 to 30 per cent alcohol or poor 
whiskey. 

Mothers who feed their children liquid medicines are laying the foundation for an appetite far worse than the 
disease they are treating. Thousands of people are sent to drunkards' graves every year from the effects of alco- 
holic medicines which first laid the foundation that enticed them on the downward road. They are next to 
the saloons. 

Mothers, is it not time to make a halt? Little by little the appetite grows, unknown to you, unconscious 
to the patient, until within the monster's grasp. Australian Life Tablets fills the great want in taking the 
place of liquid remedies for all classes of people from children to adults. 

We mail it on trial free to all readers of the Inglenook, on our special offer above. Try, this great remedy 
and be convinced. Then tell your neighbors. ' Address, 



x?iro 



200 nVE^iixi St;. 



JSlsIolI^zxcSL, Olxio. 



the: inqlenook. 




$■■ QC for this large 
f "^^^^ handsome 
f ■ steel range 

t iiigh closet or reservoir. With 

hlph, roomy, warmiDfT closet and 

rescrvoir.jiistas shown io cut, SI 1.95. 

Roaervolr Is porcelain oq iDsldc. cisbestos 

covered OD oubii Je. Heavy cost top with & 

full si;-e cooking holes, Lnrpe roomy oven. 

regular ft- 18 si le. <Wehavetist>'lcs of steel 

and cast ranges vrilhnmcli larger and smnil- 

er ovcas, sizc3 to suit all.) 

ThA body Is made of cold 

rolled steel, top aad all cost* 

gs of best pic iron. Cralei 



$ 



2-95 



for this 

Oak 

Heator 



lust as illustrated. Bums 
hnrd or soft coal or wood. 
Has drawn center grate., 
corrupated fire pot, cold 
roMea sheet steel body, 
heavy cast base, large cast 
f eeJ door, ash pit door and 
ash pan, swing top, screw 
draft- regulator. Polished 
nickel top ring, name 
plate, foot rails, etc. 

Wo have he-itlne 
stoves of every klod.' 
Hot blast, air tights, tho 
« retails for $3.00, 
forSOo. Base burners 
at J4 the regular price 




J we uselmproved duplex grate. 

Jbums wood or coal. NIokel 

'band OQ front oi mala top; 

brackets and tea shelves on | 

I closet;bandandornamentonrescrvolr; 

I ov«n door, etc. Are highly polishedfJ 

1 making the range an ornament to any home, 

I ^ TPnBAA ar« iho moat llbsral^ 

I pUMV •vormado. We will ship you 

__ I I ■bIIIIIW any range orstove.guarantoe^ 

WOtb iltobepcrfectlnconstructionand material and weguaranteeitto^ _ 

reach you inperfect condition. You can pay forltaJter you receive it. Youontflakvtl 
tnio yaur own homo and use It 30 f u}| davs. If you do not find It to be exactly as represented and perfectly satisfactory 
In every way. and the biggest bargain la a stove you ever SOW orheardof and equal to stoves that retail for double ouipricet 
you can return it to us and we will pay frdgHt both ways, so you won 'tbcoutone single cent. 

mT|J|C "An" nilT &"<^s<^Q<^l ttousandwowfU mailyouourfreeStoveCatalojf. It explains ourterms funvt 
I mo fill UU I tells you how to order. Don*l buy a stove off any kind until you aetonritewlarfle 
Slovo Catalogue for 1 004 and 1006 and see our 
literal terms and the lowest orlces over made* 

EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY CO., Chicago, III. 

20,000 INQUIRIES 

Would come pouring through our mail this week if 
all the Brethren understood just what we have. 



AN HONEST, EFFICIENT, ECONOMICAL LIGHTING 
SYSTEM FOR EVERY COUNTRY HOME. 



Acetylene Gas makes a beautiful, bright, white light. 
Ivlachine simple and safe and fully guaranteed. 

Do You Want to Know More? 

ECONOMIC LIGHTING CO.. - Royersford. Pa. 



44t]S 



Mention the INGL"!NOOK when writinB. 




ornia 

Oregon aij^ 

Washinjgton 

Fast Through Trains Daily 

over the only double-track railway between Chicago and 
the Missouri River. Direct route and excellent train ser- 
vice. Two trains a day to 

San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland 

Through service of Pullman compartment, drawing-room and 

tourists sleeping cars, dining cars, library and observation 

cars, buffet smoking cars and free reclining chair cars. 

"Dails and Personally Conducted Excursions 4 

For tickets and information apply to agents of 

The North=Western Line 

or address 

W. B. KNISKERN 

Passencer Traffic Manager 

CHICAGO 






THE 

REEDLEY 
TRACT 



The Gem of the San 
Joaquin Valley 



Embraces the Mount Campbell, 
Columbia, Carmelita, Springfield, 
Producers, Level Orchard, Kings 
River and other Colonies. These 
are among the best lands in the 
State for all kinds of fruit and 
alfalfa. Good soil, low prices, 
abundant water, healthful climate, 
perfect natural drainage. 

Special inducements made to 
Brethren. Colony now fonning. 
Write for booklet, and full infonn»- 
tion. Address, 

O. D. LYON, 

Reedley, Fresno Co'., California. 

Cap Goods! 

Our business has almost doubled Itself 
during the last year. We are sending 
goods by mail to thousands of perma- 
nent, satisfied customers throughout the 
United States. The reason is simple. 

Onx OoodB ore Bellable. Onz Tarletsr la 
Ijargr*' Onx Prices axe £ow. 

All orders filled promptly, postpaid. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or your money 
refunded. Send us a sample order and 
be convinced. Write us for a booklet 
of unsolicited testimonials and new line 
of samples, which will be furnished fra«. 
Send at once to 

R. R ARNOLD. ESgin, IlL 



ICAP GOODS 

i LARGEST ASSORTMENT. 
I BEST VALUES. 

I 

Send Postal Card for Free Sam- 
ples and Premium List. 



A. L. GARDNER, Lockbox 144. T 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 4 

hJh^iJi »Ji tji »Ji ij» »{» »J« v V "J* V »Jt ^ <$• 5< ►I" ►}• V V V •♦* 

IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
PLEASE MENTION THE INGLE- 
NOOK. 



THI 



INGL-ENOOK. 




The Big Horn Basin 

is an opportunity 
of to=day 

The man who is wise will investigate it while land 
is cheap and opportunities for investment are numerous. 
He will begin by sending for our descriptive folder 
(twenty-four pages, illustrated), which is mailed free to 
any address, and which gives a reliable, comprehensive 
report of the conditions there, and the prospects of 
future advancement. 



^^ 



A postal card request will bring a copy. 

J. FRANCIS, General Passenger Agent, 
209 Adams St., Chicago. 



N609 



^ 



^•H$M$t^-t^H$M$»^H$>^^l^^ 4o^ ^ ' "{ ♦^^^H^'^'^ t '* * $ * " t * ' t * * t * * X * ' $ *•* ? ' * ? " * ♦ * ^ * X * ' t * ^ * * h * $ ' ' t * ^ " I * ■^H$M$»^«^»jHjt*J**jMjt1$M.**»I'--*^ 



THE CRY OF THE TWO=THIRDS 

By MRS. S. R. GRAHAM-CLARK. 



A great story with a great purpose. It is a book 
for every family where there are boys and girls. 
It is as fascinating as it is powerful. It will be 
read and reread and shape character and conduct 
for life. 

It has been called the " Uncle Tom's Cabin " of 
the liquor traffic. If you want your boys and girls 
to shun the evils of the liquor traffic get this book 
for them to read. Do not wait until the horse is 
stolen before you lock the door. Order the book 
now. 

It contains 678 pages of clear type, laid paper, 
elegantly bound in handsome cloth, only $1.50. 

Address: 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, HI. 



^^^*^$*^*->J**J^***Jh^J*^J*^J^^I**^ 




"COLLAR BUTTON" 

Plain; just what you have been looking for. 
You ynll be delighted. Sample, 10 cents; 
three for 25 ceuts. GEO. B. HOLSINGER, 
Biidgewater, Va. 3t8 



WE MAKE PURE, HOME-MADE 

Apple Butter 

None better made. Safely shipped anywhere. 
Write to-day for particulars to 



C. J. MILLER & CO., 



Smithville, Ohio. 



500 Agents Wanted 

To Sell Books. Good Books; 
Good Corarnissions. Write at 
once for particulars. Addre^s, 

EBSTHBEN FUBZiISHIITQ' HOUSE, 

Elgin, Illinois. 



FIIRNITU^fALOG 



jH 



WRITE 

TO ■ pay 

lor our biff 
free furni- 
ture catalog". 
It represents 
the largest 
an d most 
complete assort- 
ment in the world of 
riXEMADEFl'Jt- 
K ITl" UE for parloi\ 
dining room, bed 
room, library, hall, veranda, . 
kitchen, store, office or any part 
of ahouse. We sell furniture in; 
single pieces at same prices deed- , 
eispay for tuiniturein wholesale, 
quantities. "We sell 
Library Tables atS3*80 up 

Hookcoees at 4*75 up 

Ikresscrs nt 4.95 up 

Chiffoniers at S.SOup 

IronBeds at 2>05u[» 

Sideboards at 9.75 up 

Wood Kockere at ,75 up 
Parlor SuUes.. at 8.70up 
and every style and kind of re- 
liable furniture at correspond- 
ingly low prices. From this 
catalog you can select any article of fur- 
niture with best judgment aud greatest 
I economy. VVE FURNISH HOMES 

IPLETE at factory prices with 

fiirnliure, carpets, curtalnci» 
Btoves, tableware, and every- 
thing needed to furnish and 
adorn a home from top to bot- 
tom. Write to-day stating 
goods wanted and we will send 
a catalog ot the cQods desired by 
return mail, free with postage 
paid. Address 

EQUITY- MFG. CO. 

CHICAGO. ILL 



the: ingleinook. 




P 



DOUBLE UMPKJN 
DOUBLE I 
DOUBLE UMPKIN 
UMPKIN PIE 



WHY NOT COME TO THE 

LAGUNA DE TACBE GRANT 

FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 

Where Pumpkins, Corn and common crops grow, as well as every kind 
of California fruit? 

Come and visit the Brethren who are living here and see what they have 
done in the past two years. 

Nearly 600 sales made since we put this land on the market and over 2,000 
people now living on the grant where there w?re but about sixty a little over 
five years ago. 

This does not look like a temporary boom, does it? Must be something 
solid behind all this. If not, five years ought to show up the weakness,' but 
instead of weakening the Laguna and its various interests are growing stronger 
all the time. 

If you are thinking of coming to California to make a home you cannot 
afford to overlook this place. 

We still have plenty of good land with abundant water for irrigation. 
The price is from $30.00 to $60.00 per acre, terms, one-fourth cash, balance 
in eight annual payments. 

COLONISTS' RATES 

will again be in force March 1 to IS, 1905. 

From Chicago to Laton, $33.00 

From Mississippi River to Laton, $30.00 

From Missouri River to Laton, $25.00 

Make your plans to start for California March 1st and you will be in time 
to buy land and put in a crop. 

Write us for free printed matter and local newspaper. Address 

NARES & SAUNDERS, = Laton, California. 

33tl3 Wenlion the INGLENOOK wnen writing 



CANCER 

Cured without 
Surgery or 
PaJn, 
Our latest 
book which 
we win semi 
free of charRft 
tellsAtlabuui 
Cancer and 
a 1 1 chronic 
and malig- 
nant 'jiseas- 
cs , and how 
they can be 
cured at home quickly and at small ex- 
pense, reference, patients cured in every 
State and Territory, ministers & bankers 

AdilreHB, Drs. Rinehirt & Co.. Lock Box CO, Eokomo, Ini 





Job Printing 

The Kind that Brings Re- 
sults, the Kind you needn't 
be ashamed of, the Kind 
that is Cheapest in the F.nd 
because Just as You Want 
it, — Furnished by 

BRETHREN FUBIiISHINQ HOUSE, 
Elffin, Illinois. 

The Inglenook 
COOK BOOK 



We have sent out thousands of 
these Cook Books as premiums. 
So great was the demand that a 
second edition was published. 
We are still receiving numerous 
calls for this Cook Book. For this 
reason we have decided to dispose 
of the few remaining copies at 
25 cents per copy. To insure a 
copy it will be necessary for you 
to order at once. . . Send to 

BRETHREN FUBI^ISHING- HOUSE, 

Elgin, Illinois. 

In Answering Advertisements please 
mention tlie Inglenook. 



EARN YOUR SUBSCRIPTION. 



For only four new subscriptions to the INGLENOOK at $1.00 each we will 
forward 3^our time on the paper for one year. 

For only five new subscribers at $1.00 each we will forward 3-our time on 
the INGLFNOOK for one year, and send you the FARMERS VOICE for one year. 

How Many Want to Earn their Subscription ? 

YOU WILL FIND IT AN EASY TASK. 

Sample Copies Free. -Mm^ TRY IT ONCE. 

Brethren Publishing: House, Elgin, Illinois. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER FOR 
MISSIONARY PURPOSES. 

The General Missionary' and Tract Committee have a plan to use the GOSPEL 
MESSENGER as a missionary in a very eifective way. They propose to help pay for 
10,000 SUBSCRIPTIONS outside the Brethren Church. 

THE PLAN. 

The plan for securing these 10,000 names is to allow any one not a member of the 
Brethren Church, and not living in a family where there are members, to have 
the Gospel Messenger from now until Jan. 1, 1906, for only 50 cents. 

Or anyone interested in this plan of doing mission work may donate the paper to those 
not members and not living in families where there are members for only 50 cents 
for the year. 

This 50 cents does not by any means pay the first cost of the paper, but the General 
Missionary Committee have so great faith in the Messenger as a missionary factor that 
they are willing to expend considerable money on making up the deficiency in order to 
have the paper read by those not members of our fraternity. 

Send vour order at once and the names will go on our list without delay. Cash must 
accompany each order. Always mention the fact that your order complies with the rules 
o-overning such subscriptions. Remember it is only 50 cents. 

Address : BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 




iNSLtNOOK: 



A' WEEKLY MAGAZINE 



.c ^ 



I 



h 0'c ^ s s ffi^ s ss ss s ssMss sms smsMK gg ss ssm^ s§^ 






PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS. 









POEM. 

THE PAST AND PRESENT. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

OUR POSSIBILITIES.— By O. G. Brubaker. 

OUR ALPHABET OF GREAT MEN.— By Olive Miller. 

RELATION OF SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON TO THE 
TEACHER AND PUPIL.— By Blanche Rinehart. 

FOREST WEALTH IN THE NORTHWEST.— By Guy 
E. Mitchell. 

THE RELATION OF PHRENOLOGY TO EDUCATION. 
—Part I.— By H. B. Mohler, F. A. P. I. 

THE LITTLE PINK SUNBONNET.— By MaBelle Mur- 
ray. 



m 



EDITORIALS. 

OUR LETTERS 



OUR POOR. 



m 




ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



anuary 24, 1 905 



$ 1 .GO per Year 



Number 4, Volume VII 



I 



the: rNGL-EINOOK. 



30,000 ACRES] union Pacific Railroad 



IRRIGATED 



Government Land 

In Nevada 

NOW OPEN FOR 

HO MESTEAD 

UNDER THE NEW 

IRRIGATION LAW 

The United States aovern- 
ment Constructs the Canals, 
Reservoirs and Lateral Ditch- 
es to the Land, and Maintains 
them for lo Years at a cost of 

ONLY $2.50 AN ACRE 



TW» Includes Water. After lo Years Water 
and Canals Belong to Hotnesteader. 



ONE-WAY COLONIST'S RATES 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, March 
I to May 15. 

Fcom Chicago, S33 00 

From St. Louis 3° 0° 

From Missouj-i River 25 00 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 



Stop Off at Reno, Nevada, 

And investigate the irrigated Govern- 
ment land. Call on Mr. H. B. Maxson, 
U. S. Engineer, for information. 



Printed Hatter FREE. Write to 

GEO. L. McDONAUGH, 

COLONIZATION AGENT 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Omaha, Neb. 



In Connection With 

Sao Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt 
Lake Railroad 

EXPECT TO BE RUNNING 
THROUGH TRAINS BETWEEN 
CHICAGO AND LOS ANGELES 
VIA SALT LAKE CITY EARLY 
NEXT SPRING. 



ONE-WAY COLONIST'S RATES 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, March 
I to May 15. 

From Chicago, S33 00 

From St. Louis, 30 00 

From Missouri River 25 co 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 

There are opportunities in Southern 
Utah and Nevada where homes can 
be had at little expense, where no 
heavy clothing and but little fuel is 
needed, where garden truck can be 
raised in abundance nearly the whole 
year, and where the people can live 
in tents throughout the year without 
suffering from heat or cold. The new 
line of the Salt Lake Route, no\\r 
building through to California, will 
pass through several well watered 
valleys in these states, in which can 
be grown apples, grain, potatoes, figs, 
cotton, sugar cane, tobacco, peanuts 
and many of the semi-tropical fruits. 
These valleys are surrounded by hills 
and lofty snow-capped mountains, 
which furnish an inspiring back- 
ground to the scene which greets 
the traveler who finds his way into 
the favored region. The climate is 
mild and delightful, and excessive 
heat and extreme cold is unknown. 
This is a good place for a poor man 
to get a home, the sick to find health 
and the capitalist to make good in- 
vestments. 

If you are interested in mining, 
manufacturing or agriculture, or seek- 
ing a new home in a new land, and 
desire to know more about the great 
resources of Utah, Nevada and Cali- 
fornia, write to Geo. L. McDonaugh, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Neb. 

And then stop off at CALIENTES 
and LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, to in- 
vestigate for yourself. Be sure to buy 
your ticket over 

The Union Pacific Railroad 

known as the "OVERLAND ROUTE," 
and is the only direct line from 
Chicago and the Missouri River to 
all principal points West. Business 
men and others can save many 
hours via this line. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



Join Excursion 

(To Sterling, Colorado,) 

South 
Platte 
Valley 

AND RETURN 

First and Third Tuesday 
Each Month 

Where the Contract has been 
Let for a 

$150,000.00 BEET SUGAR 
FACTORY 



To be Erected on Land Adjoining City 

of Sterling, Bought from Mr. David 

Plum, of Maryland, Illinois. 



Only 24 hours' run to Chicago; only 
12 hours' run to the Missouri River; 
only 4 hours' run to Denver. The on- 
ly country that can make a good 
showing to the homeseeker in mid- 
winter. Go and see for yourself — it 
need only take four or five days' time 
and you will be well repaid by what 
you see. Buy your ticket over 

The Union Pacific 
Railroad 

Which is known as "The Over- 
land Route," and is the only direct 
line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West 
Business men and others can save 
many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal to your nearest ticket 
agent, or GEO. L. McDONAUGH, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Nebr. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebr. 



XHE INGLEINOOK. 






rV '»"'♦'*** 



Weak Stomach 
Indigestion 
Dyspepsia 

To any sufferer of the above named 
diseases will be sent a 30 days Treat- 
ment of BRAWNTAWNS (SO cents) 
on the following conditions: Use ac- 
cording to directions, one tablet aft- 
er each meal and one before retiring 
for 30 days, and if you can truthfully 
say you have not received any benefit 
and do not feel any better from the 
use of BRAWNTAWNS , your mon- 
ey will be cheerfully refunded. 

Victor Remedies Company, 

FREDERICK, MD. 

FREE SAMPLE 

\ Send letter or postal for tree SAMPLE 

HINDOO TOBACCO HABIT CURE 

We cure you of chewing and smoking 
lor BOc, or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
harmless. Addiess Milford Drag Co., Milfoid, 
indiana. We answer all letters. 




37tl ^ Meanon 



hp INrUENOOK 



GOSPEL SONGS and HYMNS 

No. I. 

Has a wonderful sale, and the book 
still LIVES. We are receiving or- 
ders daily for this book and have 
sold more than 40,000 copies since it 
has been published. There is only 
one reason for this. It is simply be- 
cause 



THE SONGS AND HYMNS IT 
CONTAINS STILL LIVK 

This book is used by thousands in 
the Sunday school, young people's 
meeting and general song service. It 
contains 208 pages and sells at 30 
cents each, or four for $1. Send 
your orders to 

BBETHSEN FTTBI^ISHIZrQ HOUSE, 
EUrln, nilnolB. 



AT A BARGAIN. 

160 Acre Tarm; 10 acres under dltcli. 
and seeded to wheat. Horses, cattle, 
hogs, hay, implements; good spring; % 
mile to hot spring. House, small barn, 
fenced and cross fenced. Address, 

LAFE SNYDER, 

4t2 WEISER, IDAHO. 



500 Bible Studies 



. Compiled by : 



HAROLD F. SAYLES 



^Jli 



This new book contains 500 short, 
sharp, concise, Outline Bible Read- 
ings, contributed by prominent work- 
ers from all over the world. The se- 
lections cover a larger range of sub- 
jects, and will be very useful to one 
in private study, as well as helpful 
in preparing to conduct a meeting on 
short notice. The book will be in- 
valuable to ministers. It will be 
found very helpful in preparing out- 
lines for Bible study and for prayer 
meeting. It will prove a source of 
pleasure and profit for all Bible stu- 
dents. 

The collection is being enthusias- 
tically received, and is also sold at a 
price within reach of all. Books of 
this character, but containing far less 
material, often sell for $1.00 or more. 

The book includes a complete in- 
dex of subjects arranged alphabetic- 
ally. Note a few of the outlines: — 

JESUS IS ASX.E. 

Having been given " all power," Matt. 

28: 18, and having destroyed the 

works of the devil, 1 John 

3: 8. Jesus is able to. 

Save to the uttermost, Heb. 7: 25. 
Make all grace abound, 2 Cor. 9: 8. 
Succor the tempted, Heb. 2: 18. 
Make us stand, Rom. 14: 4. 
Keep us from falling, Jude 24. 
Subdue all things, Philpp. 3:21. 
Keep that committed to him, 2 Tim. 

1: 12. 
Perform what he has promised. Bom. 

4: 21. 
Do above all we ask or think, Eph. 

3: 20. 
Knowing his grace and power, shall 
we not come and say, "Yea, Lord"? 
Matt. 9: 28. F. S. Shepherd. 

THE BKOOD. — Heb. 9:22. 

1. Peace has been made through the 
blood. Col. 1: 20. 

2. Justified by the blood. Rom. 5: 9. 

3. Redemption by the blood. Eph. 1:7; 
Col. 1: 14; 1 Pet. 1: 18. 

4. This redemption is eternal. Heb. 9: 
11-14; Heb. 10: 10-15. 

5. Cleansed by the blood. 1 John 1:7; 
Rev. 1:5; Rev. 7: 14. 

6. We enter into the holiest by the 
blood. Heb. 10: 19. 

7. Overcome in heaven by the blood. 
Rev. 12: 11. 

8. Then sing the song forever to the 
blood of the Lamb. Rev. 5: 9. 

Rev. J. R. Dean. 

Price, limp cloth cover, 25 cents, 
prepaid. 

BRETHREN FUBI.ISHIITa HOUSE, 

Elgin, Illinois. 




CUT THIS OUT 

Of every Nook for 
six months, send 
us the 26 LION 
HEADS and we 

will send you any 
one of our sixteen 
"HOME TREftTMEHT" 
Remedies FREE. 
Send for descriptive list and make your 
selection. Live agents wanted. Profit- 
able business. 

RHEUMATISM CURED 

Our latest and finest remedy for 
Rheumatism, Sciatica, Gout, Stiff and 
Painful Joints, etc., is TONGA Tablets, 
which- removes the uric acid from the 
blood and cures Rheumatism perma- 
nently. A trial box only 50 cents. 

VICTOR MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, 



S. F. Sangee, Secy. 



SOUTH BEND, IND. 



E. C. WARD. 



HARKY W. JOHNSON. 



HOMES IN SUNNY AND RA|NY CALIFORNIA 
WARD & JOHNSON, 

RACKERBY, CALIFORNIA. 

Within Bounds of the Bangor Church. 

2tl3 MenlioD the INGLENOOK when WTitlne 

The HOME GEM WASHER 

AGENTS can make from 
S600.00 to §1,000.00 in 
one year selling this ma- 
chine. Special introductory 
price where I have no agent. 
Address, Wm. S. Miller, 
Meyersdale, Pa. 

52tl3Mention tlio INGLENOOK ^hen wnttng. 



WANTED! 




Local agents to sell first-class 
Fruit Trees, tierries, Roses, etc. 
Liberal terms. 

E. MOHLER, Plattsburg, Mo. 



Our New 

BOOK AND BIBLE CATALOGUE 

Is Yours for the 
Asking. 



BRETHBEIT FUBl^ISHINO HOUSE, 
jSlgin, IlUnoin 



BRIEFLY TOLD 



It is not a so-called patent medicine — not a cure-all — but a reliable household 
remedy, carefully compounded from medicinal herbs, leaves, roots, bark, ttc.,. ac- 
cording- to the prescription of a learned Swiss-German physician, which has been 
handed down as a heritage from ;Pather to son for three successive generations. 
Such is the story, briefly told, of 

Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer 



It is a remedy of acknowledged merit. It is distinct!}'' different from all 
other medicites. It may have its imitations, but it has no substitute. It not only 
expels the disease from the body, but it creates new, rich, red blood and sound, 
solid, healthy flesh. It has won its way into popular favor without gaudy news- 
paper advertising, solely on its own merits. 



It Fur ies the Blood 
It ids upon the Liver. 
It Acts upon the Kidnejs. 
It Promotes Digestion. 
It Regulates the Bowels. 



Quiels the Nervous System. 

t Nourishes, Strengthens and In= 
vigorates. 

It Opens the Pores of the Skin 
and Induces Healthy Per= 
spiration. 



In short, it is a family medicine in every sense of the word, and ought to 

be found in every household. It is pleasant to take and absolutely harmless. It 

is not sold by druggists, but only by local agents or the proprietor direct. 

Address: 

DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 



U2-114 South Hoyne Ave. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



the; »ngi_e:nooi^. 



ff^ 



The Big Horn Basin 

is an opportunity 
of to=day 

The man who is wise will investigate it while land 
is cheap and opportunities for investment are numerous. 
He will begin by sending for our descriptive folder 
(twenty-four pages, illustrated), which is mailed free to 
any address, and which gives a reliable, comprehensive 
report of the conditions there, and the prospects of 
future advancement. 



N609 




A postal card request will brin^ a copy. 

J. FRANCIS, General Passenger Agent, 
209 Adams St., Chicago. 






^ ^ ^ * $ * * ♦ " * t * * ♦ * **'*' ^ *'' $ * * * * ^t* ^t***^ ***'*" 



THE CRY OF THE TWO=THIRDS 



By MRS. S. R. GRAHAM-CLARK. 



A great story with a great purpose. It is a book 
for every familj' where there are boys and girls. 
It is as fascinating as it is powerful. It will be 
read and reread and shape character and conduct 
for life. 

It has been called the "Uncle Tom's Cabin" of 
the liquor traffic. If you want your boys and girls 
to shun the evils of the liquor traffic get this book 
for them to read. Do not wait until the horse is, 
stolen before you lock the door. Order the book 
now. 

It contains 6"8 pages of clear type, laid paper, 
elegantly bound in handsome cloth, only $1.50. 
Address: 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, IH. 




"COLLAR BUTTON" 

Pluin; jUHt what you have been looking: for. 
Von will bo fIoll{^bU)d. Sample, 10 contH; 
tliri-o for 2.') contB. GEO. B. HOLSINOER, 
lij-ldt'owator, Vu. :it8 



WE MAKE PURE, HOME-MADE 

Apple Butter 

None better made. Safely shipped anywhere. 
Write to-day (or particulars to 

C. J. MILLER & CO., - Smithville, Ohio. 



500 Agents Wanted 

To Sell Books. Good Books; 
Good Commissions. Write at 
oijce for particulars. Address, 

BBETEBEN FUBIiISHIirG' HOUSE, 

El^u, Illinois. 



FDRNITU^?J'°| 





WRITE 
TO - Dfly 

lor our big 
tree furni- 
ture catalog:. 
It represents 
the largest 
and most 
complete assort- 
nientin the world of 
riNEMADEFlK- 
AlTl'UEfurparloi\ 
dining room, bed 
room, library, hall, veranda, 
kitchen, store, office or any part 
of ahoupe. \Ve sell furniture in 
single pieces at same prices deal* 
eis pay for ilumituie in wholesale 
quantities. We sell 
Library Tnblc«ntS3. 80 up 

lEookcasea at 4.75 up 

]>re«sers nt 4.95 up 

Chiffoniers nt 3,80 up 

IronBcds at 2*05 up 

Sideboards nt 9,75 up 

Wood liockers nt ,7^ up 
Parlor Suites. -ot 8.70 up 
and evei'y style and kind of re- 
liable furniture at correspond- 
ingly low prices. From this 
catalog you can select any article of fur- 
niture with best judgment and greatest 
economy. WE FURNISH HOMES 
COMPLETE at factory prices with 

furniture* carpets, curtalnn. 

ifljiSSSr etOTes, tableware, and every- 
jJlJBM thing needed to furnish and 
iE8H§w adorn a home from top to bot- 
tom. Write to-day seating 
-goods wanted and we will send 
a catalog ot the goods deeired by 
return mail, free with postage 
paid. Address 

EQUITY MFG. CO. 

CH I C AGO, I LL 



« 



■^ 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



are sold. The canals and water belong to the settlers who will own and control the same. 



Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 
oats. 

Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 
the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 

D. E. BURLEY, 
S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

J. K HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. Salt Lake City, Utah. 

tCention the INGLENOOK when writlnt. 10tl3 



^ 
^ 



*: 



¥ rv A LJ^/^ is the best-watered arid State in America. Brethren are moving there because hot 
JLUa^M i.\J winds, destructive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- 
mate it makes life bright and worth living. 

We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a _ 

change for the general improvement in your coadition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on ^ 

account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise C^ 

and sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions to an- ^. 

swer and many conditions to investigate. & 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad ^ 

fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. & 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see ^ 

for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. »^ 



00,000 Acres Now Open for Settlement at g 

Twin Falls, Idaho, under the Carey Act. H 

Unlimited supply of water for irrigation and for power. A grand opportunity for the Home- ^ 

seeker who locates on these lands. 10 years time given for payment for land and water after lands ^' 



9-- 



flomeseekers' Round^Trip Excursion Tickets ^ 

will be sold to points in Idaho on the first and third Tuesday of February, March and April, 1905. ^ 

The rate will apply from Missouri river points and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloomington, Peoria and ^ 

St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific from stations on their line ^ 

in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip, plus $2.00, with ^. 

limit of IS days going. Return passage may commence any day within final limit of 21 days from ^! 

date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting point. 5^ 

COLONISTS' ONE WAY SECOND CLASS tickets will be sold to above points from March ^'. 

first to May ISth inclusive. ^; 

Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. Fine J 

Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 5 



Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 8o-acre tract, covered with sage brush. S^ 
Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres ^ 
to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 
or March the yield would have been much larger. 






f&II^LENOOK 



Vol. VII. 



January 24, 1905. 



No. 4. 



THE PAST AND PRESENT. 



Go to, go to, now ye that say, 

The past was better than to-day; 

The sky it wears as soft a blue 

As formerly it used to do. 

And Sol comes forth with strength of prime 

As splendid as in ancient time; 

And sunbeams hide among the dew 

Fair jewels, as they used to do. 

The tyrant Winter has its sway, 

But so it had in former day — 

And spring comes forth all glad and new 

As lovely as she used to do. 

And Summer doth her fruits bestow, 

And gives her flowers to high and low. 

And bids the birds to sing as gay 

As ever in a former day. 

The silver morn with misty vail 
Reflects at night the same sweet tale — 
The tale for ages she has told. 
As calm and placid as of old. 
Beneath her soft, her silver light 
The lovers vow and give their plight — 
And Cupid has not lost the art 
To throw successfully his dart. 

Is it of men that you would say, 

The past was better than to-day? 

If you will look for clearer light, 

This truth will glean before your sight — 

That Goodness has not lost her power. 

That Kindness has as sweet a flower. 

And Piety is just as broad, 

As when the earth our fathers trod. 

Go to, go to, no longer say 

The past was better than to-day; 

Put by this thought, oh, grumbling clan. 

And live for God and fellowman. 

If each will faithfully do his part, 

With willing hand and zealous heart. 

No cause will any find to say. 

The past was better than to-day. 

—Anna D. Walker. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

SNAPSHOTS. 



Some men, like wheelbarrows, have to be pushed. 

* 

A swindle cannot be sanctioned by calling it a 
church fair. 



The man %vho is disloyal to his convictions zvill not 
be loyal to anything. 

* 

Honesty often gets so vii.ved up zvith cvpedicncs' 
that it is hard to distinguish them. 

When you feel yourself becoming ungrateful, sit 
down and try to count up God's mercies. 

// the heathen are never saved, it zvill be the fault of 
stingy, close-fisted, church members, and not the fault 
of God. 

* 

The main reason why the gifted are so apt to fall 
is that the devil seems to give their cases special at- 
tention. 

* 

Money invested in a good practical education is a 
deposit in a bank that can never fail and that pays the 
very highest interest. 

* 

It is necessary to partake of the fruits of the spirit 
of St. Paid's love, joy, peace, longsuffering, patience, 
kindness, if zve hope to attain spiritual health. 

* 
We are all ungrateful creatures.. What man, for 
instance, will acknowledge that he is indebted to his 
clothes for his looks or his standing in society? 

* 

The most thrillingly patriotic and pugnaciously war- 
like speech I ever heard was delivered by a statesman 
zvho hired a substitute to bleed and die for him. 

* 
One reason why we have so many dead churches, 
IS because they are crowded with people who try to 
serve God and feed swine for the devil at the same 
time. 

* 

The wagon that makes the most noise on the road 
is the one which has the loose spokes and the rattling 
bo.rings. Same way with the man who is all talk 
and no do. 



74 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



OUR POSSIBILITIES. 



BY 0. G. BRUBAKER 



"Progress, man's distinctive mark alone; 
Not God's, and not the beasts'; 
God is; they are, — 
Man partly is and wholly hopes to be." 

The above quotation from Robert Browning fur- 
nishes the theme for this paper. It is a fact, that 
man and man alone progresses. The horses 
that lived in the time of Solomon and David were 
just as fine and no doubt could run just as fast as 
the swiftest of our own time ; the lilies that Jesus 
spoke of were arra3fed just as beautifully as those 
that grow in our finest conservatories ; the Raven 
that fed Elijah was just as black and no blacker than 
the -one that stole your corn last spring. True, we 
have finer breeds of stock and a greater variety of 
composite flowers and no doubt there are sweeter 
warblers in the feathery kingdom than there were 
centuries ago but was it progress on their part or 
was it training on the part of man ? 

On the other hand God is unchangeable and is the 
same true God to whom men have bowed since the 
dawn of Creation. He has always been, is to-day and 
always will be the same true God. We cannot even 
think of him as improving or progressing. 

The possibilities for man's advancement are only 
bounded by eternity. A very superficial study of any 
nation will prove to the unbiased mind that man's 
progress has been marvelous. The improvements of 
to-day as compared with those of yesterday speak 
volumes in favor of the above proposition. 

However great man's advancement has been in the 
past and however high we have ascended on the 
ladder of progress there are steps upon steps ahead 
of us, and heights unto which we may attain that are 
just now coming into view. Our fathers and grand- 
fathers of a few years ago never dreamed of a Chris- 
tian Workers' Society. Some of them would have 
been horror stricken at the mere mention of 
such a thing. It is only within the last few years, 
or rather months, that the church has been awaken- 
ing to the fact that there is a great power for good 
wrapped up in the souls of the young people. We 
have waited long, indeed too long to fully realize that 
the hope of the church is eventually to rest on the 
shoulders of the young. But now, that we have our 
societies, let us study our conditions and try to see 
some of the avenues which lie on before us and some 
of the possibilities that are open to us for the Master's 
work. 

A few weeks ago Prof. M. R. Myers in a very 
able address to our society in Chicago raised 
the question, for what does the C. W. Society stand? 
Did you ever stop to think seriously why we have 
such a society? Or did you ever stop to think 



prayerfully why you are a member? In looking over 
the constitutions of different societies I find that they 
have invariably as their object and purpose, " The 
moral and spiritual development of the young people." 
Being founded upon such a broad basis, our possi- 
bilities for the future are as boundless as space and 
as limitless as eternity. For who has mind so keen 
and strong that he can conceive of the spirit being 
limited in its flight toward tne Eternal, or who can 
measure the value of one hundred young people 
working together, not only for their own welfare, but 
also for the moral and spiritual growth of his fellow- 
man? God himself says that one soul is worth more 
than the world. It is positively absurd to try to fix 
any boundary to the amount of work and good ^ the 
Christian Workers can do. 

I am indebted to Ralph W. Miller for some excel- 
lent statistics which will point out a few possibilities 
for us to think about. The Epworth League of the 
Methodist church, organized in 1889 has now 30,377 
societies with a membership of 1,500,000. The 
Methodist church has made a total increase in mem- 
bership of 1,495,478 within the last 12 years. The 
Baptist Young Peoples Union has also made a won- 
derful stride. In the last 13 years this Union has 
grown from one to 12,999 societies with a total 
membership of 699,990. The number of commun- 
icants added to the Baptist church from 1890 to 1902 
was nearly 1,000,000. Other societies as the Y. M. 
C. A and the Y. W. C. A. have equally as good rec- 
ords, but these are sufficient to prove that young 
people are a wonderful power for good when well 
orgailized. What has been accomplished by other so- 
cieties, can to a great extent, be done by ours. To- 
the fair minded man -our outlook is very hopeful. 
Our educational institutions are on a par with the 
best in the land and our young people are rapidly 
taking advantage of them. But while our future 
seems hopeful and promising, we must be more thor- 
oughly organized, before we can accomplish any great 
work. We should not be satisfied with a district or- 
ganization, a state union, or even a U. S. union, but 
it should take in the entire world. An organization 
of this kind with annual, district, state, national and 
international conferences would give our beloved 
fraternity such an influx, not only of members, 
but also of spirituality, that she would no longer stand 
as thirteenth in the denominations of the world but 
would be among the first. 

It is not the purpose of this paper to convey the 
idea that numbers alone count for much. We all 
know too well that in all departments of church work, 
not only of our own but of all churches, that it is the 
willing few who are doing the work. But God knows 
and we know that there are thousands and thousands 
of our sons and daughters being irrevocably lost to 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



75 



our church and something must 'be done to save them. 
The C. W. society should be, and in many cases, has 
been the means of getting these young men and wom- 
en interested in church work. Becoming interested 
in tlie work they naturally seek admission and soon 
become active members of the church. 

While a thorough organization is still in the fu- 
ture, there are many possibilities open to the indi- 
vidual societies. What better thing could the young- 
people do than to take up the subject of missions 
and make a study of them ; giving at least one pro- 
gram each quarter entirely devoted to this subject? 
Some of the Reading Circle books could be taken 
up and read, and various divisions made of the sub- 
ject and discussed at these special meetings. This is 
one thing that can be done, and might be the means 
of your own society getting enough inspiration to 
send one or more of its own members to the mission 
field. What an inspiration for work if each society 
in the U. S. had one of her own members in the for- 
eign land. Such a thing is not impossible, for what 
others are doing we can surely do. If we can not 
have one of our own members in the field we can 
for the small sum of $16 support an orphan in India, 
who may in a few short years become a man of God, 
and a nucleus from which church after church and 
society after society may spring up. No society 
ought to feel satisfied until it is directly responsible 
for some work of this kind. It is a good thing to 
have a home society in a home church, but it would 
be far better if each society had representatives in the 
field doing some active society or church work. 

A society founded for the purpose of the moral and 
spiritual development of its members should not for- 
get the literary side of its life. A paper now and then 
on current events giving in concise and tasty form 
the leading events of the day would be very helpful. 
The time is now upon us when we as a society and as 
church workers must keep abreast of the times. 
We cannot afford, we dare not prove ourselves igno- 
rant of the events of the day. Closely associated with 
this thought is our society paper, the Inglenook. 
Inasmuch as a portion of the Inglenook for the next 
year is to be devoted to C. W. work we should take 
it upon ourselves to derive as much help from it as 
possible, and make it the paper of our society. By 
doing so this magazine will become one of the chief 
factors in effecting a thorough organization of the 
societies throughout the Brotherhood. 

A library of well, selected and well-read books on 
church doctrines and history, missions and society 
work would surely be a good investment for any so- 
ciety. An investment of this kind would not only 
prove a source of education on these various subjects, 
but would also make plain the methods of doing more 
active work. 



In conclusion ; the progress of the past few years, 
proves, if it proves anything, that we are capable of 
progressing. Let us make progress the watchword 
of to-day and of the coming year, and as the spectre 
of the old year has faded into the shades of the Past, 
and the New Year with all of its glorious possibilities 
is upon us, as the echo of the Christmas bells are yet 
vibrating through the air, shall we not as a united 
band of Christian Workers lift our souls to God and 
say, " Help us to do justly, love mercy, and walk 
humbly with thee " ? 

Chicago, III. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE FERN CLIFFS. 



One of the grandest and most sublime sceneries 
easy accessible to the people of Clay City and vicinity, 
is the Fern Cliffs located in Morgan township, Owen 
county, Ind., a few miles north and east of Patricks- 
burg, or about fifteen miles from this city. 

These cliffs do not tower above the surrounding 
country but to the contrary they consist of an abrupt 
break in the country from the hill-lands to the hollow 
below, in the form of a ravine seventy-five feet in 
depth, a few rods wide and two hundred yards in 
length, which appears more to have been formed 
by the flow of water than by an upheaval but as the 
country above its course shows no marks of any 
stream or possible flow of water it is hard to imagine 
this to have been the cause of its formation. The 
seasons of ages have softened the surfaces of the 
sand rock, which at pkces may easily be cut with a 
common pocket knife, and many visitors have left their 
initials or names and dates of their visits there to be 
seen by those who follow them. 

Under the projecting rocks and above that which 
forms the sandy floor may be seen a small seam of 
stone-coal from which constantly oozes fresh, clear 
water, making the air cool and moist, and protected 
from the sun as it is, makes a pleasant resort for 
stock during the hot dry summer days and also would 
serve as a protection from, the storm and cold of the 
winter, and no doubt the dry caverns and crevices 
higher up the walls were, ages ago, used by the wild 
beasts of the^ forest for homes and for places of con- 
cealment. 

Trees cling to the rock walls which at places have, 
by the softening of their surfaces and collection of 
decayed vegetable matter formed a thin soil surface 
upon which some have grown so large that several 
have been cut for saw-logs in the past few weeks. 
Beautiful long flaunting ferns hang upon the rocky 
walls and even spread like moss upon the cold face of 
the rock. When you visit these cliffs remember 
particularly to notice this odd freak of nature. — Clay 
City Democrat. 



76 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



OUR ALPHABET OF GREAT MEN. 



BY OLIVE MILLER. 

C. — Caesar, Caius Julius. 

Let us take a long journey backward through the 
centuries of time to the year when our Savior was 
born, — yes, even farther back than that, to the year 
100 B. C. 

We want to visit the great city of Rome and learn 
something of the struggles that are going on there. 
What a strange city it is! no railroads, no telegraph 
lines, no Christian churches, naught but heathen tem- 
ples of worship. But even though Christianity is 
wanting, many of the men are very learned, and their 
writings rank among our best classics. 

We see the evidences of war on every hand — cruel, 
unrelenting war, that has cost the lives of hundreds 
of thousands of brave men. Rome has extended her 
dominion by force of arms until she is now mistress of 
all the civilized world : Asia, Africa, Greece and Spain 
have been forced to bow their heads beneath her yoke. 
Princes and kings of every race have graced the 
chariots of her -generals for the last hundred years ; 
the spoils of all the East have been borne in her tri- 
umphal processions. Thousands of captives have been 
planted throughout the provinces of Italy, and to these 
poor people the vicissitudes of fortune have brought 
the most humiliating changes. The once wealthy 
landowner is now a slave of the basest sort. Who 
knows that it is only a question of time until he will 
be worked to death beneath his master's lash. He is 
warned not to rebel against his fate, for is not the 
Appian Way lined with six thousand crosses upon 
which expired the gladiators who under Spartocus at- 
tempted to gain their freedom and in consequence met 
the terrible death of crucifixion? 

But Rome is paying the penalty of her oppression. 
Dissensions among the party leaders have cost her 
thousands of her best citizens. The constant strife 
between the common and the aristocratic classes is 
slowly but surely paving the way for her final down- 
fall, for verily " a house divided against itself cannot 
stand." She is raising a nation of blood-thirsty, in- 
human men, in whom the old Roman patriotism and 
virtue exists, but as a tradition. The great octopus 
of political corruption has fastened its deadly grip upon 
every province of Italy, crushing the very bone and 
sinew of the nation and spilling its lifeblood from 
every pore as it struggles to maintain a shadowy ex- 
istence. 

It was in the midst of these perilous times that 
Julius Cffisar came into the world. He was descended 
from the great family of the Caesars, who claimed as 
their ancestor Julius, son of ^neas. So Caesar came 
of royal blood, yet his sympathies were ever with the 



common people. His mother Aurelia was a fine Ro- 
man matron, who had a great influence over the young 
Julius. His home Hfe was quiet and pleasant. He 
received the usual education of the patrician youth, 
arid was especially apt in Greek and grammar. He 
was early trained in the arts of war and showed much 
ability as a soldier. 

At the age of thirteen he held his first public office 
as priest of Jupiter. At seventeen he was married to 
Cornelia, whose father, Cinna, was a leader of the 
popular party. From this time we find Caesar hold- 
ing public offices in the state from the lowest to the 
highest until he had reached the office of consul. 

In the year of 58 B. C. he crossed the Alps with his 
armies and entered upon a series of wars in Gaul, a 
country that is now occupied by the republic of France. 
More than three hundred years before this the Gauls 
had swept down upon Rome and had sacked and pil- 
laged the city. Since then they had been proving them- 
selves hostile neighbors, and Caesar resolved to compel 
them to feel the force of Roman power. In seven 
years time he had conquered the Gallic territor}', to- 
gether with the German tribes under the leader 
Ariovistus. He had also made two invasions into Brit- 
ain, but did not accomplish much in these expeditions. 
He found that it was one thing to conquer the Gauls 
and quite another to hold them, so he set .about or- 
ganizing the conquered territory. At the end of two 
more years he was to return to Rome and again take 
up the consulship. But his plans were suddenly cut 
short. His rival, Pompey the Great who had been his 
friend and who was now consul at Rome, had been 
watching Caesar's success with a jealous eye. Through 
his influence the Senate ordered Csesar to disband his 
army and return home. Caesar of course saw in this 
act only his ruin and public disgrace. He called his 
soldiers together, and explaining that they had been 
treated very badly, he announced his intention to move 
directly into Rome with his armies. Without further 
delay he crossed the Rubicon, a small stream which 
marked the boundary of the Roman province. Then 
moving rapidly southward he appealed to the cities 
along his line of march. One after another they 
threw open their gates to him, and when he came in 
sight of the Capital City his rivals had fled, leaving 
him in full possession of the field. Caesar now took 
up the reins of government with all the powers of 
dictator. Terror had seized the people, for they had 
expected to see repeated the scenes of carnage and 
bloodshed that had attended the entrance of other 
party leaders into Rome. But they needed fear no 
such thing from the great and generous Caesar. He 
soon gave them assurance that life and property were 
to be held sacred. He did, however, follow Pompey 
to Egypt, where Pompey was assassinated. 

Returning to Rome, Caesar began at once his re- 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



17 



forms. His first act was to remove from the senate 
all who were found guilty of bribery or dishonorable 
deeds, and place in their stead men of clean purposes, 
so far as such men could be found. He also greatly 
increased the number of senators and gave them power 
in all questions of importance. The calendar, which 
was at that time very inaccurate, he had revised, mak- 
ing the year consist of 365 days, introducing the leap 
year. He also had in mind vast military undertakings 
which would have clinched the dominion of the Roman 
world for centuries to come. 

But Czesar had his bitter personal enemies and these 
conspired to take his life. They decided to attack him 
on the Ides of March, when he would be attending the 
Senate. Caesar was slow to appear at his accustomed 
place. Tradition tells how he was depressed ; how 
as he crossed the hall his statue fell from the pedestal 
and shivered on the floor. A paper was handed him 
disclosing the plot, but Csesar put it away without 
reading it. When he had taken his place the con- 
spirators gathered about him with their weapons as if 
to present a petition. He resisted the thrusts of their 
daggers until he saw the hand of his old friend Brutus 
raised against him. His words of mingled reproach 
and despair are familiar to us all : " Et tu, Brute ? " — 
" Thou too, Brutus ? " Wrapping his mantle about 
him he received their thrusts without further re- 
sistance and fell at the foot of the statue of Pompey, 
pierced with twenty-three wounds. 

At Caesar's funeral his friend Mark Antony de- 
livered the oration. In graphic words he recounted 
Caesar's deeds, dwelling upon his bravery, his liberality, 
and the glory which he had brought to the Roman 
Republic. When he had wrought the feelings of the 
people to the highest possible tension he held up 
Caesar's robe, pierced with the wounds of the con- 
spirators. This wrought the effect which he expected 
upon the people ; in wild frenzy they vowed vengeance 
upon tlie traitors and assassins. Two years later the 
forces of Brutus and Cassius were cut to pieces upon 
the plains of Philippi. 

Just what would have been the results if all of 
Caesar's plans had been carried out it is difficult to say. 
He had in mind the subjugation of the Germanic tribes 
and the hordes of savages in the region of the Caspian 
Sea. This would have cut down the very flower of 
European civilization, the Teutonic race, and the 
English nation would never have existed. Caesar well 
knew that all his plans could not be carried out in 
one lifetime, and he therefore secretly advocated 
an hereditary succession of rulers ; but even though 
lie kept these views secret, he was charged with being 
ambitious. Yet it was a noble ambition, for it in- 
volved what he considered the good of the country. 

The contemporaries of Caesar little guessed the far- 
reaching consequences of his achievements. He had 



already advanced the Gauls through the centuries of 
of civilization and paved the way for Christianity in 
the German provinces. In carving out his own ideals 
of greatness he proved how much of the public good 
he had at heart. 

In his account of the Gallic wars he has left us one 
of the finest and purest specimens that we have of 
Latin literature. He was " Rome's peerless master of 
prose and her greatest statesman." " The greatest 
man of all the world," says Shakespeare. " He was 
orator, statesman, man of letters and warrior. In all 
these he was great, he excelled in every thing he under- 
took." Macaulay says of him : " He possessed learn- 
ing, taste, wit, eloquence, the sentiments and manners 
of an accomplished gentleman." What was lacking, 
considering the unchristian age in which he lived to 
make him truly great? 

North Manchester, Ind. 

^* 4» ♦ 

NEW FOG SIGNALS. 



Information has been received from the United 
States Consul Thornwell Haynes, of Rouen, France, 
concerning a valuable invention which will be eagerly 
accepted by seafaring interests. 

Captain Basroger, of the Stephera Worrhs, a French 
vessel now unloading a cargo on the Rouen quays, 
has recently invented a very simple contrivance by 
which the direction of vessels in fogs can be deter- 
mined. 

The signal is given by a whistle or whistles emit- 
ting two sounds, one in a very high key, the other- very 
low. These sounds, adapted to the sixteen principal 
points of the compass, signal the exact direction in 
which the vessel is going. In the diagram shown in 
Consul. Hayne's report the high key is represented 
by a vertical dash, the diagram being read in the di- 
rection of the arrows. 

If the ship is going north it gives a low, a high and 
a low whistle: if it is going west-northwest it gives 
three high whistles and one low or deep whistle. It 
is seen at a glance that all the signals from north to 
south by way of the east begin with a deep or coarse 
whistle, and all those from the north to the south 
by way of the west begin with a high or keen whistle. 
This arrangement permits one to tell the principal 
direction of the vessel by the first sound that strikes 
the ear. 

The instrument proper consists of a box containing 
a cogged drum which, somewhat after the manner 
of the keys in a wind instrument, determines whether 
the sound be high or low. A retarder, controlled by 
a crank, causes the rotation of the drum, so that two 
sounds cannot be blended or confused. The crank 
turns once every second. 

In sailing vessels the signals are produced by bells. 



/ 



78 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



RELATION OF SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON 
TO THE TEACHER AND PUPIL. 



BY BLANCHE RINEHART. 



The pupil is as responsible for the position he holds 
as the teacher is for his. All members share an equal 
responsibility in the Sunday-school but not all are re- 
sponsible for the same positions in the school. 

The pupil and the teacher meet in the school for 
the purpose of studying together the Word of God. 
In order that this great Sunday-school work may be 
uniform over the land, lessons are assigned. The 
lesson is a portion of the Word of God and this the 
pupil is to study. 

It is designed to give us a greater knowledge of 
the Bible and not only to give us a knowledge of Bible 
history and geography and of Bible times, but it gives 
us an insight into the lives of the people of past ages 
and gives us a knowledge of God's dealings with them 
and, thereby, we may better understand his dealings 
with us. By knowing of their trials, their temptations, 
their failures, their sorrows and their joys, we are 
strengthened and encouraged to go on in ours, and 
knowing that they were human like as we are and al- 
though they fell often, yet, if they willed to do the will 
of God and came to him with penitent heart he was 
ready and willing to forgive all and extended the same 
protecting hand over them. Though we fail often, 
are discouraged often, if we still purpose to do his will, 
he extends the same sheltering hand over us and 
shows us the same loving-kindness. 

It teaches us of Christ, the Great Teacher, and his 
salvation. 

The object of the Sunday school is to help children 
to get up higher, to help those striving for the truth, 
to instruct the 5'oung and old and lay foundations 
of Christian character. 

Yet, without study, this we cannot get. We must 
study and study hard if we would be thus benefited. 
If the mission of the Sunday school is thus to prepare 
material for future church work, it will not be accom- 
plished in us unless we do study. 

Reading the lesson over and over and getting a 
general outline of it is not study. While one may re- 
ceive much benefit from the right kind of reading, Paul 
taught Timothy that his success in the church de- 
pended on Bible study. " Give diligence to present 
thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth 
not to be ashamed, handling aright the word of truth." 

When one applies himself with zeal and interest to 
get from it all that is possible to get from it, then that 
is study. One must put hard conscientious work on it. 

The question which confronts most pupils is, " How 
can I make this study of my lesson most beneficial ? " 
Not all have the same opportunity for preparing the 



lesson yet all can and should make opportunity for 
doing so. Do not wait until the last minute and then 
run quickly over the lesson. That would be mere 
reading and not even good reading at that. Begin 
the very first of the week; too much time cannot be 
spent upon the lesson. The more )^ou study, the more 
you will find to be studied. The best way is to set 
apart a certain time each day to the preparation of 
the lesson. After studying the lesson, meditate much 
upon it for it is through meditation that its great truths 
will dawn upon you. 

Most of us are so situated that our time is not al- 
together our own, there are others depending on our 
labor. It is true, it takes time to have a well pre- 
pared Sunday-school lesson. But we say we are so 
busy, we have not time to study. And that is true, 
working as we do, we have not time for much else. 
But is it right for us to spend so much time on our own 
work to the neglect of the Lord's ? This is one thing, 
I think, of which all of us are guilty. We think our 
work is so irrjportant, it is so necessary. If we would 
just stop and consider, the Lord's work is just as im- 
portant, even more so, but in our bustle and hurry 
to get on in this world we forget, we grow careless. 
We ought to place this work above our other work 
and make it more necessary. 

Yet, we can read the lesson over in less than five 
minutes, in less than three, and, by doing so carefully, 
we may get a general idea of it and during the day we 
can think upon it. Our work is often such that it 
does not require such close attention and we can have 
our minds on the lesson and compare it with other 
similar lessons we have heard, we can compare it with 
other Bible characters and searck for evidences of 
God's power. We can get at 'the central thought of 
the lesson and search for the hidden truths of it. 

One thing of such great advantage is the discussion 
of the lesson in the family. Talk it over when the 
family is together, of an evening, or at the table would 
be a very good place. It not only impresses it more 
firmly on the mind but it brings out so many things 
which we might not get otherwise. I would insist that 
3'ou talk the lesson over in the family because of the 
great benefit it will be to you. 

Get help in all the ways you can and use all the 
helps you can find in connection with the Bible. 

The abuse of helps is when one will allow them to 
cause him to neglect personal study. When he ac- 
cepts every statement as a gospel fact. When he 
simply commits what the author has to say. Accept no 
opinion as your own until you have weighed it with 
the knowledge you have and tested it. 

But what shall the pupil study? What must he 
learn in the lesson ? He must get well the connections 
between the lessons, he must know the Bible geog- 
raphy, the history of the place and wherein the Lord 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



79 



has had a hand in it. He ought to know ihc similar 
events. He must have a definite aim in the preparation 
of the lesson. Do away with this haphazard way of 
trying to learn whatever is mentioned in helps. He 
must plan his study of it. 

The most essential thing is to ask Cod for his guid- 
ance, for his wisdom in its preparation. That is the 
vital thing. You cannot make a thorough preparation 
unless you do have his help. Although you may be 
able to make a fine recitation, yet, to you the lesson 
will lack that ^life-giving power which brings you in 
closer touch to the divine. 

Solomon says if we would get wisdom and under- 
standing, 

" If thou seek her as silver, 
And search for her as for hid ireasures; 
Then shalt thou understand the fear of the Lord 
And find the knowledge of God." 

If this be our motive in preparing the lesson, then 
is Sunday-school work a benefit to us. 

\Mien the pupil has made a thorough preparation 
lie is ready for the class and not before. I am speak- 
ing particularly of pupils in advanced classes. Of 
course, the primary pupils cannot be expected to get 
any more than is placed before them. 
]\Iore depends upon their teacher. 
The object of the recitation is not to get knowledge 
so much as to give it, to test the knowledge we have 
of it, to discuss the lesson, compare our views of it 
and correct them. 

The pupil is there to learn; the teacher is there to 
help him learn. 

The pupil must know his lesson when he comes to 
the class and enter into the recitation with heartiness 
and enthusiasm. This with his close attention will be 
evidence of the fact that he is there because he enjoys 
being there and not because his conscience tells him 
that he ought to be there when, really, his heart is in 
some other place. At suggestion of the teacher, he 
is willing to answer questions or express an opinion 
which shows that he has made previous preparation. 
The model Sunday-school pupil will not be content 
to only answer the questions but will think of some of 
the hardest questions to ask the teacher. 

With the assistance of such pupils the teacher can 
more effectually draw out the beautiful thoughts with 
which every lesson is fraught. 

In fact a recitation depends largely on the- pupil. 
More than we as pupils realize. An uninteresting 
recitation is not because the teacher has failed alto- 
gether, but because the pupil has failed. 

If one goes to Sunday school simply to have some 
place to go and commit a few facts of the lesson merely 
that he may be able to answer a few questions, such a 
pupil will not derive much benefit from the class or 
the class derive much from him. 



The lesson will be interesting only through activity 
of both teacher and i)U])il. Teacher is first as he 
.superintends the recitation and not because of impor- 
tance, for I verily believe the pupil to be the most im- 
portant factor in the class. If there are good pupils, 
model pupils, even if there be not a wide-awake teacher 
there will be an interesting recitation, one that will 
be beneficial. 

A class that knows nothing, that hears nothing, that 
can say nothing, and the teacher has to answer his 
own questions, what does it profit? They are a trial 
to the teacher, a disgrace to the school, and are fail- 
ures in God-given opportunities. 

The active pupil will aid the teacher in her attempts 
to make an interesting and profitable recitation and will 
accept her views when in accordance with sound doc- 
trine. 

Now that the pupil has recited his lessons is he ready 
to put in practice what he has learned? 

When these lessons are learned by even young chil- 
dren whose minds are like wax to receive impressions, 
they cannot fail to give a religious character to the 
coming generation. 

The pupil will not lay aside putting in practice what 
he has learned when he lays aside his Sunday clothes 
but will treasure up the good impressions of the Sab- 
bath and try to make them shine forth in his life from 
day to day. 

When he has created within himself a desire for a 
greater knowledge of the Word of God then has he 
learned his Sunday-school lesson and put it in practice. 

Then is he the model Sunday-school pupil which 
becomes the model church member and finally a model 
Christian. 

Boston, Indiana. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

RUSSIA'S GREAT POPULATION. 



According to the latest report of the Russian Sta- 
tistical committee of 1885, the gross population of the 
Empire was at the close of that year 108,786,235. 
The total urban population is given at 12,760,000, 
residents in 1,274 towns. The villages and parishes 
contain a population of 77,542,271. There are only 
four cities containing more than 200,000 inhabitants — ■ 
St. Petersburg, Moscow, Warsaw, and Odessa. Nine 
towns have a population varying between 100,000 and 
200,000, and twenty-three towns between 50,000 and 
100,000. The total number of school institutions is 
41,492, with a male attendance of 1,850,964, and of 
females 638,970. Of schools of agriculture and for- 
estry there are only sixteen in the whole Empire, with 
an attendance of 1,156 pupils, or, say, one such school 
to every 5,862 of the population. — Selected. 
* * * 

Cotton is king. — John Randolph. 



8o 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



VAST FOREST WEALTH IN THE NORTHWEST. 



BY GUY E. MITCHELL. 



It is Being Traificked in at the Expense of Uncle Sam. 
Workings of the Forest Reserve Lieu Land Law. 

Washington, Dec. 31, 1904, (Special). — Politics 
aside, Congress has at times succeeded in innocently 
doing things of incalculable injury to the country. 
Such has been the effect of a law passed a few years 
ago creating what is known as Forest Reserve Land 
Scrip. Few people throughout the country, espe- 
cially the East, know anything of this law, yet its 
workings have been perhaps the most iniquitous ' of 
any land law ever administered by any government 
in any age. It has resulted in millions and tens of 
millions of dollars worth of the most magnificent mer- 
chantable timbered lands in the world passing from 
the government into the hands of lumber syndicates 
and speculators, for which little and in some cases 
absolutely no value has been received by the govern- 
ment. 

On its face the forest lieu land law was a beneficent 
measure, and so the majority of Congressmen thought 
when they enacted it. It provided that where the 
government created a forest reserve and settlers al- 
ready had their homes in that reserve, they could 
exchange their lands for any other public lands which 
they might select, the idea being that the forest re- 
servation, by stopping further settlement, would con- 
demn them to isolation. Then the law was made 
to apply broadly to all people or corporations who 
might hold or have filed on any land in forest reserves 
created or to be created. 

The land-grant railroads in some instances and 
large land dealers and speculators held enormous 
tracts of land, good and bad, in the forest reserves. 

How the Government is Cheated. 

Where poor it was immediately exchanged for good 
timber lands ; where good the owners, or the com- 
panies to whom they sold it proceeded to divest it 
of every foot of timber, and then turned it in to the 
government and located in lieu of it, acre for acre, 
tracts in the pathless forests of Washington, Oregon, 
Northern California and Idaho, forests mentioned by 
the Secretary of the Interior as worth $50 and even 
$100 an acre. 

The people of the West — those who are not inter- 
ested in timber steals of various sorts — are outraged 
at the magnitude of the timbermen's operations, not 
at the great legitimate lumbering industry of the West 
but at the evasion of the timber laws, the absolute 
downright fraud, stealing and perjury which is oc- 
curring in every timbered section and most of all at 
the reckless methods of lumbering by which entire 
watersheds are denuded and destroyed, thus drying 



up the water resources for irrigation upon which the 
fertile western valleys depend for their very life. 

The difficulty which the irrigator and the forest 
preserver will meet is this. Neither are organized. 
The great mass of the people would favor the abroga- 
tion of this abominable law, and the recent National 
Irrigation Congress at El Paso passed a strong reso- 
lution to that effect ; nevertheless what is everybody's 
business is nobody's in particular, and the forest lieu 
land scrip- law is likely to continue on the statue books 
unless an overwhelming public sentiment sweeps it 
away. And indeed so well are the timbermen organ- 
ized that any effort at legislation will immediately 
arouse a great western uproar. It will be but the 
protest of men who are making enormous fortunes 
through the squandering of the nation's greatest re- 
source. 

To Create a Lobby. 

An instance of this is seen the the following imi- 
tation type-written letter which is being sent broad- 
cast among all timber land dealers. 

"Dear Sir:— 

I am advised that immediately upon the assembling of 
Congress in December, either the Mondell bill restricting 
the purchasing power of Forest Reserve Scrip will be 
placed upon its passage, or a new bill still more disas- 
trous will be introduced, providing that all patented 
lands within Forest Reservations which have not been 
relinquished and lieu selections made against them, are 
to be condemned, and owners will be forced to sell to 
the Government at the government price, presumably 
$1.25 per acre. If this latter bill is enacted into law, 
Forest Reserve Scrip will be a thing of the past. 

It occurs to me that all scrip dealers should unite and 
resist these measures vigorously. Able counsel should 
be retained to defeat these measures. I would be glad to 
have you offer suggestions, naming suitable counsel. 
You may depend upon me to cooperate in any movement 
which seems best. I am ready to contribute my propor- 
tion of the necessary funds to push this matter vigor- 
ously. Prompt action is necessary. 

May I have your immediate reply? 

Yours very truly," 

This letter says that " Forest Reserve Scrip " will 
be a thing of the past. It should be a thing of the 
past and this Congress about to convene should 
promptly make it a thing of the past. The owners 
of these lands included in forest reserves should be 
forced to sell them to the government at, not neces- 
sarily $1.25 per acre, but at the appraised value, as is 
advocated by the National Irrigation Congress and 
by The National Irrigation Association. Many of 
these lands have already been denuded of their last 
stick of timber and are not worth fifty cents an acre. 

With this forest lieu land law upon the statute 
books it is a -question whether the creation of addi- 
tional forest reserves does not become more of a men- 
ace to forestry and irrigation than a good. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



81 



We Are Facing a Timber Famine. 

The most eminent forest authorities tell us that 
at the present rate of forest destruction there will be 
no forests in the United States within forty years. 
There is no more certain way to bring this condition 
about than to continue the operation of the forest 
reserve scrip law and the timber and stone law. 

With a wise forest policy by which the title to the 
remaining public forest land shall remain in the gov- 
ernment, allowing the sale of stumpage, as recom- 
mended to Congress by President Roosevelt, thus assur- 
ing a second growth of timber and the endurance of the 
water supply, an easy solution of this great problem 
is oflfered. It is opposed of course by timber and 
lumber speculators and manipulators, but the Amer- 
ican people should open their eyes to the facts, as 
they frequently do when abuses have reached a cer- 
tain limit, and make themselves heard on this tremen- 
dous question. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

NO MORE SUNDAY BULLFIGHTS IN SPAIN. 



the cabinet on December 15. In the new ministry, 
General Azcarraga is premier and General Villar is 
minister of war. The death of the Princess Maria 
Mercedes, sister of King Alfonso, leaves the little 
Prince Alfonso the heir to the throne. Early in De- 
cember, King Alfonso authorized his minister at 
Washmgton to sign the Spanish-American treaty of 
arbitration. — From " The Progress of the World," in 
the American Monthly Rex'iezvs of Revleivs for Jan- 
uary . 

4« 4> * 
TWO NEW STATES IN PROSPECT. 



Signs of a social and economic awakening in Spain 
have been many during the past months. In March, 
1904, a commission appointed by the Cortes, known 
as the Institute of Social Reforms, succeeded in pro- 
mulgating a law prohibiting work on Sundays, and 
enforcing the closing of all industrial and commercial 
establishments. In October, this body, after a heated 
discussion, ratified the absolute prohibition of Sun- 
day bullfights. It was felt that a national custom so 
long established could not be abolished at once, but 
the prohibition of its observance on Sundays (the day 
on which nine-tenths of the bullfights took place) is 
considered to be the deathblow of bullfighting in 
Spain. The powerful Institute of Social Reforms, 
which has thus accomplished such a work for civiliz- 
ation, had also been investigating strikes in the king- 
dom, and has made some suggestions for bettering 
labor conditions, which the government is proceeding 
to carry out. The census of 1900, showing the popu- 
lation of the kingdom to be close to nineteen millions, 
indicates that the number of illiterates is being slow- 
ly reduced, the percentage of the population able to 
read and write having increased from 28 J^ in 1887 
to 34 in 1900. Commercially, and industrially, also 
Spain is progressing. Reports of the Spanish rail- 
roads for the year 1903 show a satisfactory improve- 
ment, and negotia.tions have been almost concluded 
with France for building two new railroads through 
the Pyrenees. The figures of Spain's general trade 
for the year 1903 show a great improvement over all 
preceeding years of the decade, and a number of com- 
mercial treaties, notably one with Cuba, are being 
negotiated. Reforms are also being carried out in 
the army, so drastic as to cause the resignation of 



The next important business on the Senate's calen- 
dar after the Philippine improvement measure was the 
bill providing for the admission of two new States 
into the Union. Few people, either in Congress 
or outside of it, seem to understand how much more 
important the admission of a new State to the Union 
is than almost any other possible business that can 
come before Congress. Tariffs can be made and un- 
made, and most other matters of legislation are sub- 
ject to amendment or repeal from time to time. But 
hasty or ill-advised action in admitting a State to the 
Union is irrevocable. At this very moment the whole 
moral sense of the community is aroused by questions 
arising out of the mistake that was made in admitting 
Utah at a time when it would have been far better to 
keep Utah in the territorial condition.' In the Presi- 
dential election, in November, Nevada cast a total 
of 11,826 votes. The admission of Nevada to the 
Union was a fearful mistake, for which the Consti- 
tution offers no remedy. The present bill provides for 
the restoration of the permanent lines of the Indian 
Territory that had been temporarily broken up by the 
granting of a territorial form of government to a 
portion of the Territory under the name of Okla- 
homa. To the area thus restored the name of Okla- 
homa is to be given. There are people enough and 
other conditions justify the admission of Oklahoma as 
arranged for in the Senate bill, which affords due pro- 
tection to the rights of the Indian tribes. The bill also 
unites the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico, 
and admits them as one State under the name of Ari- 
zona. These Territories, it is true, are not ripe for 
admission to the Union, whether separately or jointly ; 
but there are some reasons why the matter may as 
well be settled once for all. The chief advantage in 
admitting Arizona and New Mexico now as a single 
State would be that this would end the mischievous 
political agitation for their separate admission, — a 
scheme fostered chiefly by selfish private interests. 
There is now good reason to believe that the State- 
hood bill, as duly reported from the Senate Committee 
on Territories, will become a law during the present 
session. — From " The Progress of the World" in the 
American Monthly Reviews of Reineius for January. 



82 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



THE RELATION OF PHRENOLOGY TO 
EDUCATION.— Part 1. 



BY H. B. MOHLER, F. A. P. I. 



"The proper training of the natural faculties is 
the very essence of all true education." — This being 
true we should know something about the location 
and relative functions of the primary faculties. Here, 
this science at once becomes simple and practical, in- 
structive and very beneficial. In its theory there is 
no system of "' Mental Philosophy " in vogue to-day 
that embodies a code of principals so rational and har- 
monious with the laws governing our organism. 

Phrenology is not an inductive but a deductive 
science ; all its principles being , formulated from ob- 
servation and established facts vested in nature. Robt. 
Hunter aptly says : " It is the true science of mind, 
because every other system is defective in enumerat- 
ing, classifying and tracing the relation of the facul- 
ties." 

Our present methods of education indeed differ 
widely from the Phrenological, and at best formulate 
no code of principles which can be utilized in the 
proper training of children. Dr. Geo. Otto, of the 
University of Copenhagen, truly says : " As the true 
science of mind, I consider phrenology the only one 
that, with a sure success, may be applied to the edu- 
cation of children " — and in -no other way, indeed, can 
we reasonably account for the many differences of 
character and talent, these alone being traceable to 
the variations of temperament, quality of organization, 
inheritance, age, sex and conditions of mental de- 
velopment. 

Dr. Guy of Kings Med. Coll., London truly says : 
" Phrenology is by far the most practical theory of the 
human mind, because it reduces all our mental oper- 
ations to their primary law, by analyzing their several 
modes of combined activity." To-day, however, au- 
thors and teachers of "Mental Philosophy" combine 
these primary functions and regard them as inde- 
pendent forces whereas, for example, " perception " 
has at least seven distinct functions comprising its 
activity. In point of comparison I may here say, that 
every element of matter involves quality, quantity, 
density, proportion, color, etc., and so re- 
quires the specific activity of one or more perceptive 
faculties, because there is a designedly definite relation 
existing, through which we discern the forces of nature. 

"Retention " is a power of mind, not confined to a 
distinct psychological centre but has at least five dis- 
tinct functions — as in the above. Reflection, volition, 
imagination etc., too are but combined activities of 
faculties comprising the will, intellect, and esthetic 
functions so that the different shades of character and 
talent are cast in proportion to the development of the 
primary faculty. 



" Memory, however, stands in diametrical opposition 
as it is not a " primary power " nor has it a specific 
function or location as its activity belongs to and ema- 
nates from every intellectual process — thus the greater 
the development of any one faculty comprising the 
intellect, the stronger will be its memory. This ac- 
counts for its modifications of strength and weakness 
in our individual — for example, he lacks " memory 
of dates and time," yet has strong "memory of 
words " — another has a fine " musical memory " but is 
deficient in arithmetical and calculative power — still 
another is apt in recalling facts, and practical data 
but lacks in theory, principles, and " higher mathe- 
matics" which I may say, especially actuates the re- 
flection and constrictive functions. 

The above are but a few of the puzzling propositions 
confronting us yet our present system of education or 
"applied mental science" sheds no light on these vari- 
ations of talent nor how to redeem them. The teacher 
is ignorant of these laws so that the grading of pupils 
does them an injustice as too much is dependent on 
partial talent or exceptional ability along special lines 
without regard to physiology, hygiene, physiognomy, 
craniology, heredity, ethics and anthropology — these 
seven which Joseph Cook aptly terms the "phreno- 
logical Pleiades of the mental mariner who sails in 
search of a correct knowledge of men." 

Grand Junction, Colo. 

(To be continued.) 
^ ^ ^ 

THE AMERICAN STEEL INDUSTRY. 



When Andrew Carnegie and his partners started 
in business in Allegheny, over forty years ago, they 
possessed only a small forging shop, whose specialty 
was axles, made from scrap iron. A few years later, 
they built a small rolling mill in Pittsburg, where 
they rolled into bars wrought iron made in four 
puddling furnaces. During the Civil War these 
works paid handsome profits, so that a new plant, 
known as the Upper Union Iron Mills, was added, 
and afterward became one of the principal factors 
in the enrichment of Mr. Carnegie and his partners. 
For there they made the universal plates and the 
beams, channels, and other shapes so essential in bridge 
and building construction. 

As the entire Pittsburg district at that time, — only 
a generation ago, — produced less pig iron in a year 
than the Duquesne furnaces alone now make in a 
month, and as all the pig iron needed for the Upper 
and Lower Union Mills had to be purchased at high 
prices, Kloman, Carnegie & Company built the first 
Lucy furnace, making it considerably larger than the 
Clinton, Eliza, and other blast furnaces already ex- 
isting. A few years later, the second Lucy furnace 
was built. Both have been constantly improved up 
to the present time, with the result of greatly reduc- 



THE TNGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



83 



ing' labor and increasing the output by the means of 
mechanical and metallurgical devices. 

One of the greatest steps in advance was the em- 
ployment of chemists to aid the blast-furnace manager, 
and subsequently to direct the operation of the Bes- 
semer and open-hearth steel works, in conjunction 
with educated mechanical engineers, whose impor- 
tance also increased as mechanical appliances multi- 
plied. To-day, the analyses and drawings of large 
steel works are numbered by the thousands. 

What has brought about the displacement of iron 
by steel in less than thirty years? Principally, the 
the cheapness and great productivity of the processes 
of soft-steel manufacture and the small number of men 
required for a large output. 

Moreover, one of the greatest aids to the intro- 
duction of the Bessemer process in the Pittsburg 
district was the desire on the part of ironmasters to 
get rid of puddling, which was the cause of more la- 
bor troubles than all the other departments of their 
works. The puddler himself has been benefited by 
the change, so far as he has been able to exchange 
his former laborious task for the less strenuous steel 
processes. 

Another important reason for the change to steel 
was the comparative excellence of the product and its 
adaptability to railway and engineering construction. 
In fact, our modern railway development and fire- 
proof building construction would be impossible with- 
out Bessemer and open-hearth steel. — From "Pitts- 
burg's basic industry^ — Steel;' by William Lucien 
Scafe, in the American Monthly Review of Reviews 
for January. 

* -I* •:■• 

LIBERTY OF THE PRESS UNKNOWN IN 
RUSSIA. 



Liberty of the press is unknown in Russia. Nor are 
the burning topics of the day ever dealt with by the 
journals. Current events of the most intense interest 
are passed over in silence. Americans may perhaps 
realize what this means by imagining if they can how 
they would feel if no newspaper were allowed to pub- 
lish a true and complete statement of the ravages 
caused by a complete failure of the crops in five States 
of the Union where the population was dying of hun- 
ger; and if every journal were forbidden to criticise 
the President, Vice-President, the Secretary of State, 
the Postmaster-General, and every prominent official. 
But even the idea which Americans would then form 
of the condition of the Russian press would be inade- 

Kquate. Take an instance. In 1901, there was a par- 
tial famine. People endured harrowing sufferings, 
children starved before the eyes of their parents, 
mothers died leaving helpless children dying, too, yet 
the press scarcely mentioned the famine. Sometimes, 
indeed, for weeks it never once alluded to it. Hard- 



hearted indifference, it might seem to a foreigner; in 
truth, it was only implicit oiiedience to the authorities. 
And even the most obedient papers may be stopped. 
The Vyatskaya Ga^eta, for example, was read in 
proofs and approved by the censor before being pub- 
lished. One day, it occurred to the governor to allow 
the paper to appear but to hinder the people from 
reading it. Therefore, 43 police inspectors, 306 rural 
policemen, and 1,196 police watchmen were dispatched 
to the huts of the peasants to seek for all numbers of 
the journal for this year and former years ! In a few 
days he quashed his order. Respect for law is not 
fostered by caprices of this . nature. — From " The 
Daimi of the Neiv Era in Russia," by E. J. Dillon, in 
the American Monthly Revieiv of Reviews for Jan- 
uary. 

* ♦ ♦ 

MARK TWAIN LONG AGO. 




A Thin, Scrawny Fellow When he was a Wheelman 
in California. 

Captain Selvvyn Ramsey, of San Joaquin City, 
Cal., claims the unique distinction of once having 
employed Mark Twain as second wheelsman at a 
salary of $18 a week. Captain Ramsey is one of the . 
old pioneers in California river navigation. He com- 
manded the first steam packet that ever ran up the 
Sacramento River, and although he is over 80 years 
old and hasn't been on the bridge for more than twelve 
years, yet he still loves to talk of the good old river 
days. 

" Yes, I used to know Sam Clemens," said Captain 
Ramsey to an interviewer, " and he was one of the 
best wheelsmen I ever had. It was along in 1868. 
I was on the old John Wallace at that time, on the 
Sacramento River. 

" About the time I met Qemens I was pretty hard 
up for help. Wages were good and lots of men de- 
serted for the mines. All the wheelsmen had to be 
broken in, as there were no experienced river men 
in the country in those daj's. And I was pretty glad 
when I heard of a young fellow who had been in a 
pilot house on the Mississippi. The minute I tied up 
in San Francisco I went right over to the United 
States mint, where I got his address. As soon as I 
saw hirn at the wheel I engaged him on the spot. 

" Mark Twain was a thin, scrawny looking fellow 
then, but he was a great hand making friends, and 
all of us liked him: I think he was on the Wallace 
about five months — it's so long ago that I forget the 
exact time. He was a straight out and out wheels- 
man, and he learned the river like a book. The 
country was pretty wild in those days, and a man had 
to watch out for himself, but Clemens got along with 
the best of them." 

♦ ♦ * 

Learn the luxury of doing good. — Goldsmith. 



84 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



OUR LITTLE FRIENDS. 



1.— The Dove. 

The little dove has been for thousands of j'ears our 
Father's emblem of peace, sweetness and purity. He 
gave it a noncombative disposition and taught his 
other feathered friends to respect it. It occupies the 
same relation to the other birds with reference to war 
and turmoil that our Quaker friends do to us combat- 
ants in times of war. We respect their conscien- 
tious scruples and never expect them to enlist as 
soldiers, so we never draft them into the army. 

During" the many years that I have chummed with 
birds, I have never yet known any feathered creature 
to harm either a dove or its eggs. It builds a fragile 
nest of twigs in the crutch of a tree, and there with- 
out protection of any kind rears two and sometimes 
four young a year. It is left to man, made in the 
image of God, very often to use that little creature 
as a target for his shot gun. 

The dove is a very valuable bird for the reason that 
its food is almost exclusively the seeds of noxious 
weeds; and also according to my philosophy because 
of the lessons which it teaches. No boy or girl can 
look at a pair of young doves sitting side by side on 
a limb waiting for their breakfast without being up- 
lifted and made better. 

If our God had expected that he would ever have 
children in his image who would wantonly destroy 
that bird, he would doubtless, have made it more 
prolific. He knew when he made the quail so heavy 
and delicious that it would be sought and utilized 
as human food, therefore he taught it to rear thirtv ■ 
to forty young a year. I am glad to know that at 
this present time in our good old Hoosier State, our 
Creator's theory of the dove is understood and adopt- 
ed. It is a sad commentary on Christian civilization 
in Indiana that until two years ago his plans in that 
respect were ignored. It remained for Indiana school 
children to bring about a reformation. Two years 
ago they sent a man to the legislature who expressed 
their sentiments on that subject. The legislature 
acted and placed the dove on the protected list. 
As long as the stars shine together and school children 
sing and pray, just so long will God Almighty have 
the privilege of rearing his emblems of peace in In- 
diana. 

You cannot ramble for half an hour in any cem- 
etery in the United States without seeing the image 
of a dove chiseled on a little marble slab. It was or- 
dered to be placed there in each instance by some bro- 
ken-hearted mother in memory of her child sleeping 
the last sleep beneath that sod. All honor to the 
noble children in Indiana who led the legislature to 
protect the little dove. May the children of the en- 
tire country soon rise up in their might and demand 



protection for God's feathered creatures, who in his 
plan are so valuable to man. 

2.— The Purple Martin. 

I have never yet known anybody to issue a proper 
invitation to the purple martin without the invitation 
being accepted that season, and he and his little wife 
becoming valuable summer guests. The invitation 
consists in the providing of a little home. The ideal 
is a little box made out of inch lumber, two feet long, 
eighteen inches wide, fifteen inches high with a little 
roof-shaped covering, and a partition through the cen- 
ter extending half way to the top of the box, making 
two compartments, with an entrance three inches 
high and two inches wide to each. The box or boxes 
should be placed on the top of a pole, eighteen feet 
from the ground, in an open space .either in the rear 
or in front of the residence. Care must be taken 
to have the boxes in an open space and so far from 
the ground that freedom from cats is insured. It 
will not do to put a box on the top of a shed or in a 
live tree and then complain that the martins fail to 
appear. They are seeking to raise their young that 
they may work for this world, and not that they may 
be food for worthless cats the instant they put their 
little heads for the first time out of their home. The 
bird comes to Northern Indiana on the sixth, seventh 
and eighth of April each year, so if the boxes should 
be put up before the fifth of April, little pieces of lath 
must be nailed across the doors or openings and kept 
there until the fifth of April, else the English sparrow, 
our present pest and coming curse, will steal the home. 
The martin getting possession first will easily protect 
its home and children from the sparrow and all other 
birds until the sixth or seventh of August, after which 
time it does not occupy the box, but gathers itself 
together in large flocks and sleeps until migrating 
time in the tops of dead trees or on telephone or tele- 
graph wires. The door to the box should therefore 
be closed on the seventh of August to remain as the 
protected home of a bird which will pay enormous 
rent for the use of fifty cents worth of material. 

The martin belongs to the swallow family, and 
while it is no more of an air scavenger than the swift 
swallow it has this advantage in utility — it always 
stays in sight of its home, and therefore must depend 
for its food and the food for its children upon insects 
in that immediate vicinity. It is strictly insectivorous, 
and never eats anything, nor permits its children to 
eat anything, that it does not catch in the air. The 
strange part of its biology is its wonderful appetite for 
mosquitoes. From break of day until dark it 
is the busy scavenger of the air. Pity the day, kind 
reader, when no air scavengers shall visit your happy 
home. Five years from the sad day when they be- 
come extinct, life in our glorious country will be un- 
endurable'. 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



85 



Chumming with the bird and watching it feed its 
voung within a foot of my face hour after hour, I give 
you these figures as conservative. It feeds its young 
about 225 times a day, and each time uses from five 
to seventy-five Uttle insects. I believe that the average 
feeding consists of ten articles, therefore the result 
of the day's work is two thousand mosquitoes de- 
stroyed. Suppose that you have a little colon\' of ten 
hjartins. The ten martins raising four, children to 
the pair would result about as follows: 2,000 insects 
a day for each pair, five pairs, io,ooo insects; thirty 
(lays, 300,000 insects; a season, 1,000,000 insects. 

I need not in this article call your attention to the 
fact that the mosquito is a very prolific insect, and that 
the female mosquitoes, if not given their place in the 
economy of nature as bird food, propagate their 
species very rapidly, and that therefore the blessing 
that comes from having our air scavengers in May 
and June is oft unappreciated. May the time never 
come when we will realize the rapidity with which 
insects increase in a locality where there are no birds. 
A thorough study of the martin, forces the conclusion 
that it is a purple singing machine, fashioned by our 
God for a practical purpose. It lives its life close to 
our home if we will permit it. It is an uplift to the 
boy or girl who sees papa and mamma martin feeding 
little Isaac, Mandy, Jimmy and Julia in love and 
kindness as they put their little heads to the open door 
of what to them is a brown stone front. To the man 
or woman who cares to study it properly it is an 
•nspiration and a revelation. 

Reader, won't you go thirty minutes before daylight 
in the June time, and sit quietly beneath the purple 
martin's home. You will hear him and his wife 
come out, say some pleasant words to each other 
and then start soaring, upwards, and upwards, and 
upwards into the air, presently" out of sight, going 
together to catch the first rays of the sunlight, in 
praise to their God. Wait patiently, and presently 
you will see them circling, circling, circling back to 
mother earth, and just at daybreak you will hear them 
talking a little while on the top of their home and see 
them start out after some breakfast for the children. 

Will you not prepare for such an experience next 
year by building martin boxes as suggested in the 
first part of this article? — Bombay Guardian. 
* * * 
FEMALE BOOTLEGGERS SLY. 



The most persistent class of bootleggers that ever 
infested Indian Territory is composed of a few women 
who have made it a vocation, says Marshal Bennett, 
who has had many years' experience with the outlaws 
of this country. A woman bootlegger can ply the 
illegitimate business longer without getting caught, 
and is harder to convict after she is caught, than a 



It is believed that at this time there are but two 
women bootleggers in Indian Territory. These the 
ofificers have had their eye iiixju for a long time. 
They are morally certain that they are selling liquor 
all the time, but it has been impossible, so far, to catch 
them at it or find liquor in their possession. The 
cunning of a woman in this dangerous business is 
remarkable. 

In 10 years of experience. Marshal Bennett states 
that he knows of but seven or eight cases where women 
bootleggers have been caught and convicted in the 
courts of the Indian Territory. This, too, in the dis- 
tricts where the enormous dockets of the courts are 
burdened with liquor cases, the number of cases of 
this kind exceeding two to one all other cases on the 
docket. 

But these cases are all against men. The only 
woman who has been convicted of bootlegging in the 
western district for a long time is Mrs. M. J. Wade. 
She was arrest,ed at Wagoner and sentenced to a year 
and a day in the Federal prison at Columbus. The 
officers aver that she had been selling liquor at Wa- 
goner and other places in Indian Territory for 10 
years before she was captured. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE MARCHIONESS OYAMA. 



man. 



It is an interesting fact that the wife of Marshal 
the Marquis Oyama, the Generalissimo of the Japa- 
nese army, is an American by education and training, 
although not by birth. Forty years ago the Japa- 
nese Government sent a large number of able and 
intelligent Japanese lads to foreign countries to study 
Western civilization. Then the wise men who had 
determined to make this change in their nation con- 
sidered that men alone cannot take an effective step 
forward, and decided also to risk a proportion of 
girls of a good family in foreign lands, in order that 
they might be fitting companions for the after-life 
of the educated young men. One of these girls is 
now the Marchioness Oyama. She is described by 
Japanese people as a charming woman of great in- 
telligence and a fitting companion to her capable 
husband. She was in this country for 10 years, from 
1 87 1, under the care of a clergyman and his wife. 
The little girl attended school for seven years and 
then entered Vassar College, and took her degree of 
B. A. there in 1881. Her essay at her graduation 
was on a politicial subject — namely: "The Policy of 
Great Britain Toward Japan." It attracted a good 
deal of attention from its ability and from its proph- 
ecy that Japan would force the world to recognize 
her as one of the leading civilized nations by display- 
ing ability in commerce, the arts and government. 
The l\Tarchioness wore American dress and was much 
Ukri' 1 \- hor rollee'e class. 



86 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



THE INGLENOOK 

A Weekly Magazine 

PUBLISHED BY 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription price, $1.00 per Annum, in Advance. 

E. M. Co1)1}, Editor. 

The Inglenook contains twenty-four pages weekly, devoted 
to the intellectual, moral and spiritual interests of the young. 
Each department is especially designed to fill its particular 
sphere in the home. 

Contributions are solicited. Articles submitted are adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine. A strong effort will 
be made to develop the latent talent of the constituency. 

Sample copies will be furnished upon application. Agents 
are wanted everywhere, and will be awarded a liberal com- 
mission. Change of address can only be made when the old 
address, as well as the new, is given. Club rates for Sunday 
schools and other religious organizations. Address as above. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



OUR LETTERS. 



A MINISTER once said to your editor, " There 
is as much difference in people as anybody." At first 
this sounds rather empty, but the more you think of 
it and the more experience you have, the more of a 
truism it becomes. 

There are two ways of conducting newspapers and 
magazines. One way is to stop the paper the minute 
the time is out ; another way is to let the subscription 
continue until it is ordered stopped. We are not 
going to discuss which is right or which is wrong. 
We only wish we knew which is morally right and 
which is morally wrong. Hundreds of good honest 
people differ in their views on this point. When we 
conclude to stop the magazine the very week the time 
expires, because someone has suggested that is the 
proper way to do, we are sure to receive letters in 
a day or two which look like this : 

Editor Inglenook, 

Dear Sir: I didn't receive any Inglenook last week. I 
know my time was out three weeks ago, but I didn't 
get to town to buy a draft and renew my subscription. 
I intended to take the paper next year, but if you can't 
trust me a week or two for the money, I don't want your 
paper at all, so you can just stop it for good. 

John Jones. 

Of course when we receive several letters like this 
w'e are constrained to think that it is best to be lenient 
and wait a week or two and see if we will not receive 
a renewal or an order to discontinue, so we do that. 
Then in a few days we get another bunch of letters 
and they read something like this : 

Editor Inglenook, 

Dear Sir: I have received three papers since my time 
is out and your paper still continues to come; I receive 
it every week. I thought your paper was one which 
would stop when the time was out. If you had stopped it 
when the time was out I had expected to renew, but 
since I find that it is one of those papers you can never 
get stopped I don't want it at all. My subscription is 



paid up to the present, except those three you have 
sent since the expiration of my subscription, and I don't 
expect to pay for them because I didn't order them. 

James Brown. 

Now, dear Nooker, if you would receive a bunch 
of letters like the first ones, one week, and ■ in the 
course of two or three weeks you would receive a 
bunch like the second sample, what would you do? 

We are glad to say that we do not have many peo- 
ple of either of these classes but there is still one, once 
in a while, who expects us , to loiow what he thinks 
about everything. After duly considering these two 
phases of the subject, we have decided to allow your 
paper to continue for a few days, giving you ample 
time to renew, for some of our Nookers live out in 
the country and some of them live where it is very 
cold ; and then after a reasonable length of time, if 
we do not hear from you', we are almost compelled 
to stop the paper so as to get a letter from you. We 
explain this to you so that you may avoid missing 
a single number and lose connection in any of the 
work. 

There is another class of mail that would puzzle 
Grecian philosophers; this class of mail comes, gen- 
erally, in the form of postal cards, which reads : 

Boston, Mass. 
Editor Inglenook, 

Dear Sir: Please change my address to St. Louis, Mo. 

J. Jones. 

It is evident that this subscriber has changed lo- 
cations and wants his paper changed, which is all right ' 
and which we are glad to do, but you see he forgot 
to tell us where he got his mail, formerly, on a 
rural route otit of Boston, from a certain box, or at 
a certain street and number; in fact he did not say 
that he got it at Boston at all. We can only guess 
that from the postmark on the card. Then you notice 
that he signs his name " J. Jones " and in looking 
over our Boston mailing list, we find we have a 
" James Jones," a " John Jones," and a " John J. 
Jones." Now, since he does not give his particular 
address, who can tell which Jones he is? Then we 
either have to write him a letter and ask him, or guess 
at it, which is very uncertain business. When he 
answers our inquiry as to which Jones he is, he will 
say, " I have been taking your paper for years and it 
seems to me you ought to know me by this time," 
not ever dreaming that there are six thousand other ^ 
Joneses scattered over Uncle Sam's territory. Al- 
ways be sure, when changing address, to give both 
the old and the new, and give them correctly. 

In the same mail we received this card : 

Sweetwater, Nevada. 
Editor Inglenook, 

Dear Sir: Please continue my subscription to the Ingle- 
nook another year and I will remit in a few days. We 
like it fine. Henry Simpson. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



87 



Our clerks hunted in the files in vain for Henry 
Simpson. By looking' at the postmark on the card, 
and finding that he lived at Sweetwater, Nev., they 
turned back to the files and notice at that post office 
a certain Delia Simpson gets the Inglenook, but there 
is no Henry Simpson. The next best thing to do 
is Id write Henry Simpson and ask him if lie is ac- 
quainted with Delia Simpson, and we get the follow- 
ing information : 

Sweetwater. Nevada. 
Editor Inglenook, 

Dear Sir: Delia Simpson is my litllc girl and has taken 
the Inglenook four years; it seems by this time you 
ought to know where we live. Please leave the paper in 
her name as it always has been. Here is that dollar I 
promised you the other day when I wrote. 

' Respectfully yours, 

H. Simpson. 

You see, Brother Henry thought we ought to know 
that his name was Henry Simpson and that he could 
sign his name " H. Simpson " and that we could not 
interpret that to mean Howard, Hulda or Henrietta, 
and he expected us to know that the neighbors called 
him " Hank " and that his little girl was named Delia. 
Such things are very familiar to each family around 
home, and while we are personally acquainted with 
several thousand of the Nookers, it is impossible to 
know them all and remember all of their names. 

There is one more difficulty into which we fall, and 
yet it is not quite so common as the ones spoken of 
above; here is an example: 

Limewood, Texas. 
Brethren Publishing House, 
Elgin, 111. 

Gentlemen: Please change the address of my paper 
from Philip Curry, of Mankato, Minn., to Philip Curry, 
Limewood, Texas, R. F. D. 7, and oblige. 
Fraternally yours, 

Philip Curry. 

Now, who sees the error in this letter ? This is the 
best letter of the whole lot of samples. Instead of 
addressing it to the Editor Inglenook he has ad- 
dressed it directly to the House, which insures him 
much better service, because it is not delayed with 
editorial mail. The editor would have to simply carry 
his letter to the Business Department anyhow. 

Again, notice how carefully he gave his full name 
and address where he had been getting his mail and 
where he wants to get it in the future, and so we know 
exactly how to change it ; but the worst trouble in this 
letter is, ws don't know what to change, he just said 
his " paper," and how are we to know whether he 
he means the Inglenook, the Gospel Messenger or 
the Missionary Visitor? 

You may think that we have manufactured these 
letters to suit the purpose in this editorial, but the only 
thing we have supplied are the names and the post offi- 
ces : other material is furnished us in abundance. 



What has been said has been said in all kindness in 
order that the readers of the Inglenook may have the 
best of service and that the clerical force in the of- 
fice may be relieved of an abundance of brain-rack- 
ing work that can easily be avoided, provided that 
when letters are written, the writer will suppose that 
we know nothing about his case and will tell exactly 
what he wants, no more, no less. Be sure and ad- 
dress all matters of business to the Brethren Publish- 
ing House, Elgin, 111., while personal letters or matter 
regarding articles for the magazine, or the policy or 
scope of the paper, might be addressed to the editor 
if so preferred. 

♦ * * 

OUR POOR. 



Not long since we made a request for a little money 
with which to supply the unfortunate in Pest Houses, 
Hospitals, etc., who want to take the Inglenook, but 
are too poor. We are glad to state here that almost 
the next mail brought money for that purpose, and the 
calls were answered. 

Now we have several calls in our Office for the 
Inglenook, from young men and women ^vho are not 
unfortunate, in the way of affliction, but who are so 
situated financially that it is impossible for them to 
subscribe or even renew their subscription. W^e are 
starting an " Inglenook Poor Fund " for that purpose, 
and an)r money sent, marked as above, will be cast in- 
to that fund and used when we are satisfied that the 
calls are worthy ones. 

How many of the Nook family have 75 cents ready 
to send us, with which we can shed fifty-two rays of 
sunshine in the year 1905, into the life of someone 
who needs your assistance? Send it to the Brethren 
Publishing House, Elgin, 111., and mark it " Ingle- 
nook Poor Fund." 

♦ ♦■ ♦ 

" Our Possibilities " by O. G. Brubaker, was deliv- 
ered at a union Christian Workers' meeting at Naper- 
ville. 111. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Be sure and read the letters on this page and see 
which one is like the one which you wrote. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Every man that hath this hope in him purifieth 
himself, even as he is pure. — i fohn j; j. 

♦ ■* ♦ 

If he hath wronged thee aught, put that on mine 
account. — Philemon 18. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Who will be the first one to start the " Poor 
Fund " ? 

♦ * ♦ 

Don't fail to read " The Little Pink Sunbonnet." 



88 



THE INGLENOOK.— Jan-iary 24, 1905. 



C-a.r rer^-t :EIa,^pern.ir:Lg^s 



• Andrew Carnegie, to date, has assisted twelve hun- 
dred ninety libraries, seven hundred seventy-nine of 
which are in the United States. These are chiefly lo- 
cated in cities and maintained by municipal taxation. 
New York has a hundred nineteen Carnegie libraries, 
Pennsylvania has seventy. There are only four states 
that have not received gifts, they are, Delaware, Rhode 
Island, Mississippi and Arkansas. His donations now- 
amount to thirty-nine millions. 

* * * 

The famous orchestra leader, Theodore Thomas, 
died of pneumonia at Chicago. Mr. Thomas was born 
at Essen, Germany, Oct. 11, 1835, and at the time of 
his death was 69 years of age. He studied under New 
York musicians, and made his debut as a violinist in 
Germany at the age of ten. He was a solo violinist in 
New York for some years, making advancements in his 
musical work. He founded the Thomas orchestra in 
1867 and maintained it until 1888. He moved to Chi- 
cago in 189J and has since been conductor of the Chi- 
cago orchestra. He was musical director of the 
World's Columbian exposition in 1893. 

* * ■* 

January i, the city of San Francisco was visited 
by a number of earthquakes. The shocks were not so 
severe, yet several plate glass windows were shattered 
and the tower of the city hall was twisted. 

* ♦ * ' 

Wm. H. Baldwin, Jr., President of the Long Is- 
land railroad, died in his home in Locustville, L. I., 
Jan. 2, of cancer. 

* ♦ * 

One hundred twenty-five little girls, employed in a 
paper box factory in New York, have been on a strike 
for two months. The strike was brought about be- 
cause their wages were reduced from three dollars a 
thousand, to two ninety a thousand. A similar case 
is reported where two boys, whose ages were three and 
five respectively, were offered ten cents each by their 
mamma, if they would stop their racket and sit on a 
chair quietly for an hour. Thej' at once sternly re- 
jected the proposition, informing their mother that 
union prices were fifteen cents per hour for such labor. 

* * ♦ 

Fredk. a. Stock is to succeed the late Theodore 
Thomas as conductor of the Chicago orchestra during 
the remainder of the season, and probably thereafter. 

* »> * 

Philander C. Knox, of Pittsburg, Pa., was unani- 
mously nominated to succeed the late United States 
Senator Matthew S. Quay. 



A FIRE at Greenville, N. C, destroyed two ware- 
houses and several small buildings and about a million 
pounds of tobacco. It is supposed to have been in- 
cendiary. 

<jt tj. ^ 

J. PiERPONT Morgan recently paid S6,ooo for the 
oldest piano in existence. 

♦ ^ * 

The total coinage of the United States mints for 

December was 8709,644. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The wildest excitement prevailed recently at Jeffer- 
son, Ohio, as a funeral procession was on its way to 
the cemetery; because some friends, who lived at a 
distance were tardy, the undertaker was asked again to 
show the remains ; upon removing the coffin lid he no- 
ticed the least bit of moisture on the glass, which was 
unquestionable indication that life was not extinct. 
Physicians were summoned, and life restored. It was 
a narrow escape, but he is sound and well to-day. His 
name is Nathan F. Chidister. 

♦ * * 

It is now the purpose of John Alexander Dowie to 
establish Zion City number two. The site has been 
selected in Mexico, and negotiations are contemplated 
which will embrace a million acres of land fronting 
on the Gulf of Mexico. He expects to have the city 
ready for formal dedication by the beginning of next 
year. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

A TROLLEY car jumped the track at Newark, N. J., 
plunging down a steep grade, injuring the conductor 
and motorman. 

♦ ♦ * 

The people of Australia have a novel way of caring 
for the outcast. They have no almshouses or orphan- 
ages, but have receiving houses, where waifs are cared 
for a few days until country homes can be found. The 
government provides foster parents with a dollar and 
a quarter per week for the care of the child and for 
proper clothing. The child must be in school during 
the school age. At fourteen he begins to work; his 
earnings are placed in the postal savings bank. At 
eighteen he goes out into the world, fairly well edu- 
cated with a good general idea of labor, and is prac- 
tically independent. Thus for about sixty dollars a 
year the government makes a man or a woman out of 
material that would otherwise be thrown away, which 
will contribute to the wealth and character of the na- 
tion. They prevent the manufacture of criminals and 
are without the expense of courts, almshouses, 
prisons and reformatories. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



89 



The Santa Fe stockholders will increase their capi- 
tal stock by $50,000,000 and will issue bonds to that 
amount for the purpose of building new roads and im- 
proving old lines in the southwest. 

♦ ♦ * 

A RAILWAY tunnel at Catawissa, Pa., caved in and 

damaged considerable track for the Philadelphia and 

Reading company, it was discovered, however, before 

any trains were due. 

4. ^ .♦. 

Cassie Chadwick, in jail at Cleveland, received a 
pleasant call from her husband. Dr. Chadwick, who 
has just returned from Europe. The Doctor says he 
will believe her to be innocent until she is proven 
guilty. 

4* 4* 4* 

A GAS jet was the cause of a fire in one of the 
Episcopal churches of Chicago. The jet was turned 
sufficiently as to ignite some decorations which soon 
would have resulted in a large fire. The cool-headed 
minister in charge, noticed the very beginning of the 
fire and raising his hand in benediction, he dismissed 
the assembly and thus avoided a dreadful panic. 

* * ♦ 

Francis H. Nichols, the American explorer and 
correspondent, at Thibet, who left this country in 1903, 

is reported to be dead. 

4t 4. 4. 

The tallest structure in New York City is the build- 
ing of the Nezv York Times, thirty-one stories high. 
Experts refer to this building as one of the most re- 
markable architectural triumphs of the world. It has 
one girder which weighs thirty tons and it is claimed 
that eighty thousand driven rivets were used. A 
fifty-foot railroad runs obliquely through its basement 
without contact at any point. 
4. 4. 4. 

At Mexico City, recently, while some excavations 
were being made for the foundation of the new nation- 
al theater a water fountain was unearthed, of the 
most ancient style and character. It was literally 
covered with hieroglyphics, figures of Indian warriors, 
priests, etc. Many foundations of buildings were also 
found. .^ ^ ^ 

Two hundred and fifty thousand miners are out of 
employment, as the result of a coal strike in Germany. 
4> 4> 4> • 

Suspicions have been aroused by quarantine officers 
that yellow fever is on board the steamer Dora, which 
carried one hundred and eleven passengers from Pana- 
ma to Havana. It is to be hoped that the detention 
hospital will check the spread of the dreaded malady. 
4t 4. 4* 

The New York Central & Lake Shore trains are 
soon to be fitted out with wireless telegraphy outfits. 



At a church festival at Washington, Pa., a large 
number of people were poisoned by eating oysters. 
Seven are reported seriously ill. The investigation 
proves that the oysters had been twice frozen and 

thawed. 

♦ ♦ 4* 

Sir W^L McEwen, the (.'niincnt English surgeon, 
has lately announced his conclusion that the vermiform 
appendix has a very important function in assisting di- 
gestion. He thinks also that it is the chief habitat of a 
certain micro-organism which is industriously effective 
in attacking imperfectly assimilated nourishment. 

*$* (2* 4$* 

The home of Frank Noweski, a Polish miner, at 

Morris Run, Pa., was consumed by fire. The entire 

family of ten, except the oldest son, aged 18, was 

burned to death. The boy saved his own life with the 

greatest difficulty. 

4t 4. 4> 

Representative Maynard of Virginia, has intro- 
duced a bill to increase the salary of the President to 
$75,000 per year and the Vice-President to $15,000 
after March 4, 1905. The bill further provides that 
after the expiration of his term of office, the President 
shall receive $25,000 a year as long as he lives. 
4. 4. 4. 

Captain Brude, a Norwegian, has invented an egg- 
shape lifeboat, which has been thoroughly tested on 
a storm-tossed voyage of six months, which ended at 
Gloucester, Mass., Jan. 8. The captain says the boat 
has come fully up to his expectations, and the crew 
testify that they scarcely noticed the action of the high 
seas. He thinks he has an indestructible lifeboat. 
4. 4. 4. 

The new scientific appliance which is expected to 
supplant the present stereopticon and lantern slides for 
the purpose of scientific demonstration known as the 
epidiascope has been presented to Brown University 
anon3aTiously. The machine is a German product, and 
is the first one of its kind to be set up in this country. 
Its peculiarity is that it is capable of projecting 
opaque objects upon the screen directly, hence it is not 
necessary to make lantern slides, or even photographs. 
For example, if a watch is placed upon the carrier of 
the machine the screen shows the wheels going round. 
Also the natural colors and textures of objects are re- 
ported exactly. This will make it of great usefulness 
in illustrating scientific lectures to students. 
4. 4. 4. 

Secretary Hay strongly recommends the establish- 
ment of a corps of student interpreters in Japan and 
Korea. He suggest five to be provided for the former 
country and three for the latter. The total cost of 
which is estimated at $8,000. The communication was 
forwarded to the House. 



90 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




THE LITTLE PINK SUNBONNET. 



BY MABELLE MURRAY. 



" Winifred, run down the walk and pick up that 
little pink sunbonnet. If there's anything I do hate to 
see it's youngin's things layin' round and I'll not have 
it." 

It was Saturday morning and Miss Susan's busiest 
day. No matter how beautiful was the morning, nor 
how sweetly the birds sang, she had her routine of 
work to perform and never did her tall gaunt figure 
cease its motion until the last detail was looked after. 

Old maids are always precise, but Miss Susan was 
an exaggeration, and though liked by most every 
one, she was nevertheless the cause of much laughter 
and many huge jokes. 

This morning as she shook her skirts and finished 
brushing her boots, she saw the minister's wife com- 
ing down the avenue. Instantly the tall figure 
straightened, and a little frown settled over her steel 
gray eyes. 

" Well, I hope she ain't comin' in here," she said 
to herself. But all in vain. The unwelcome guest 
came tripping up the walk, but she was a sweet little 
woman, with such charming ways, and such a winning 
smile, that very few people could ever be angry with 
her. And when she beamed upon her hostess with 
her big hazel eyes, bright and innocent, even that 
severe lady could not think so harshly of the golden 
hair that curled so girlishly under the large hat droop- 
ing with its weight of daisies. 

" Good morning. Miss Brown, isn't this morning 
just too delightful ? How glad I am that I found 
you at home. I really didn't expect to have such 
Juckl" 

"Indeed? I am sure you wouldn't be apt to find 
me any other place. Saturday is my busy day." To 
1:his the little woman made no reply. 

" You see," she said, giving her parasol a twirl, 
■" the Aid Society is going to have another meeting 
this afternoon at half past two, and I came to see if 
you wouldn't come and help us. We want to do 
something for the sick at the poor farm." 

".Well, I don't know about that, I think I have done 
■enough for that poor farm already, and people 
oughtin' to expect so much from me." 

'" Yes, I know, Miss Brown, and you have always 
!been so 'kind to us. It was so sweet of you to take 



Winifred, from the farm; by the way, how is she 
doing?" 

" O, I don't know! She gets along mighty slow, 
but with all the good victuals, I can't get that poor- 
house look out of Ler eyes. I think I shall send her 
to school." 

" Yes, Miss Susan, that would be the best thing you 
could do. I think she would be happier if she played 
with little Lucile. Saw the child on the corner as 
I came down. She is such a sweet little dear. 
Your brother'.s daughter, is it not?" 

Evidently this was painful to Miss Susan, for her 
mouth twitched nervously. 

" Yes," she answered angrily, " I oughtn't do a 
thing for his child, the way he has treated me! Left 
me here all alone while he went out west and invested 
in mines, married, his wife died several years ago, 
and he eight months ago, so they sent Lucile to me." 

" But Miss Brown, you surely don't hold that child 
responsible for her father. You surely wouldn't turn 
her out of your home?" 

" Oh, as for that, I never thought of it, none of 
our family ever went to a poor farm or orphan 'sy- 
lum and its only right I should uphold our pride." 

That settled the argument and the minister's wife 
rose to go and started down the walk. " I promise I 
won't keep you another moment; but won't you come 
this afternoon ? " 

" Well if they think they can't get along without me, 
I'll come." " There that's a sweet old dear ! good- 
bye ! I am gone this minute ;'.' she waved her parasol 
and hurried away. 

" Winifred, come in this minute and scratch the 
mud off these steps. Bring in Lucile's bonnet." 

From here, Miss Susan hastened into the kitchen. 
Soon after, the back screen door was swung open 
and a timid little girl entered. Miss Susan was not 
ready to receive her. " Lucile Sarah Brown, where 
did you leave your sunbonnet ? " The child brushed 
her short curls from her face and looked at her aunt. 
" I — why — I don't know — I — for — get where I leit » 
my^bonnet. I've been playing on the street." ^ 

" Yes, do you think that's any place for a little girl 
to play? It makes me tired the way we have to wait 
on you. Take this bonnet and go and don't let me 
see you again. There — you are always in my way," 
stormed the angry aunt. 

The child paused, " Do you really mean what you 
say. Aunt Susie?" "Mean what I say? Do I ever 
say anything I don't mean? Get out of here this 






THE TNGLENOOK.— Tanuary 24, 1905. 



91 



niiiuitc," and she hurried to lock the screen after tlie 
retreating figure. 

As Lucy turned out of the gate, Winifred came 
round the corner with a scrub pail and saw her. 

" Where are you going? " she called. 

" I don't know." 

" Then why are }-ou going ? " 

" Because." 

" Lucile, talk sensible, how long are you going to 
stay?" 

" Forever." 

" Did Aunt Susie send you away ? " 

" Yes." 

" Oh, won't you stay — I love you ! " 

But the child only shook her head and continued 
on her way. 

Within an hour the little house was shining and 
evervthing set to order. Dinner came, but no Lucile ; 
one o'clock — then two, still no sign of the missing- 
child was to be seen. 

Late in the afternoon, when Miss Susie came forth 
dressed in her best, she missed the merry laughter of 
the child and the little sunbonnet that was always 
in the way, a great change came into her heart. 

" Winifred," she cried, " bring me a handkerchief, 
and — and if Lucile should come home, give her some 
dinner and all the cream and cookies she wants." 
Then she whirled oiT like the wind as though she was 
ashamed of what she had said. The afternoon was 
spoiled for her, she could think of nothing but Lucile. 
She left much earlier than the other guests, and as 
she hurried towards her home, she walked into the office 
and inquired for her mail. The postmistress handed 
her a sealed package. Miss Susie snatched her let- 
ter and hurried away. Hastening along the quiet 
village street, she opened the letter with trembling 
fingers, a copy of the " Last will and testament of 
Hiram A. Brown ;" and then after a few moments 
gave a cry. " Oh Lord, have mercy ! " she whispered. 
" One hundred thousand dollars — and to think I 
sent that child away ! " At every corner she seemed 
to fancy her brother pointing his finger at her and 
demanding the whereabouts of his little Lucile. 

The sun had set low in the heavens and the deep 
shadows began creeping over the land. From the 
barnyards came the lowing of cattle and over the 
sweet fields, the fire-flies fiew in great numbers. 

As Miss Susie turned a corner, there lying in 
the road she saw the little pink sunbonnet. She 
picked it up quickly and looked frightened. Where 
could the child have gone on this lonely road? One 
branch led to the river, and the other to the railroad 
tracks! Just then, lier eyes caught sight of a little 
figure lying asleep among the tall stalks of corn. 
With a low cry. Miss Susie tenderly gathered the 
little wanderer in her arms and folded her to her 



breast. The blue eyes opened in a flash and the child 
struggled. 

" Let nie go," she begged. 

" 1 didn't hurt your corn — really I didn't. And 
I was hungry— and I didn't eat one grain." 

" Oh, I have been so wrong— so cruelly wrong, 
dear. And you must forgive me, I did not mean 
what I said this morning." 

" Aunt Susie, will you let me have all the ginger 
cookies I want ? " 

" Yes, yes, dear." 

She carried her charge home, where Winifred had 
supper waiting for them, then followed one of the 
happiest meals that had ever been eaten in the cottage 
for many a day. 

It was well nigh midnight when Miss Susie kissed 
Lucile and came softly down the stairs. At the kitch- 
en door, she stumbled over something flat and small, 
stooping she found it was the little pink sunbonnet. 

"God bless it," she murmured with a happy smile. 
" As long as I live I shall love it, for when it is here, 
I know that the owner is close at hand. . 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
A WRONG SIDE OUT BOY. 



Jack was cross ; nothing pleased him. His mother 
gave him the choicest morsels for his breakfast, and 
the nicest toys, but he did nothing but fret and com- 
plain. At last his mother said: 

" Jack, I want you to go right up to your room 
and put on all your clothes wrong side out." 

Jack started. He thought his mother must be out 
of her wits. 

" I mean it. Jack," she repeated. 

Jack had to obey ; he had to turn his stockings 
wrong side out, and put on his coat and trousers and 
collar wrong side out. 

When his mother came up to him there he stood — 
a forlorn, funny-looking boy, all linings and seams- 
and ravelings — before the glass, wondering what 
his mother meant; but he was not quite clear in his 
conscience. 

Then his mother, turning him around, said : 

" This is what you have been doing all day, making 
the worst of everything. You have been turning 
everything wrong side out. Do you really like your 
things this way so much. Jack ? " 

" No, mamma," answered Jack, shamefacedly. 
" Can't I turn them right ? " 

" Yes, you may, if you will try to speak what is 
pleasant. You must do with your temper and man- 
ners as you prefer to do with your clothes — wear them 
right side out. Do not be so foolish any more, little 
man, as to persist in turning things wrong side out."' 
— Ohio Work. 



92 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



• ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»» 

;: Reading Circle and Christian Workers' Topics ij 



By EI^IZABETa S. BOSEITBERG-EB 

■»-»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»»»»»»» 



THE MARRIAGE SUPPER. 



For Sunday, February 5, 1905. 

Scripture Reading, Psa. 19 : 1-10. 

I. The Preparation of and Invitation to the Feast. Isa. 
25:6; Luke 14:16, 17. 
II. The Astonishing Unanimity of Refusal. Luke 14: 

18-20. 
III. The Invitation Extended and Made More Urgent. 
Luke 14:21-24. 

(a) Come. (b) Bring. (c) Constrain them. 

IV. What Was My Greatest Hindrance in Accepting the 
Invitation? 
Text.— And sent his servant at supper time to say to 
them that were bidden. Come; for all things are now 
ready. Luke 14:15-24. _^ 

References.— Proverbs 9:1-10; Matthew 23:1-10; Zech. 
7:8-14; Isaiah 65:1-12; Revelation 19:4-9; Revelation 22: 
8-17; Matthew 25:34-40; Acts 13:45, 46; Luke 13:26, 27; 
Luke 17:26-30; Matthew 6: 33; John 14:2; Matthew 11:28. 
Part I. — The Invitation. 
An Oriental feast is not like our banquets in this 
country, a gathering of friends whom we are anxious 
to entertain. A feast in the East is really a public, 
not a friendly social gathering. It is given on some 
special occasion, such as a marriage or the birth of a 
son, or at the conclusion of a harvest or a vintage; 
then the servants are all busy for days before the 
feast, and the whole neighborhood is invited. The 
Arab or the Syrian to-day strictly observes the com- 
mand given by Moses, " Thou shalt not . . . shut thine 
hand from thy poor brother," and takes care to feed 
the hungry, so all were invited and many would come 
to the festival room and look on. It is still customary 
to send a servant to tell them that all things are ready, 
it is easy to do this, because the guests are living close 
together, and they do not have time-pieces, so when- 
ever the feast is ready the servant tells them to come. 
Jesus invites us to come to him, he says " whoso- 
ever will, let him come," did you accept the invitation? 
He has invited your entire family, every one of your 
Sunday-school class, and you are the servant who 
should tell them to come now because all things are 
ready. Do not be afraid to urge them to come at once, 
Jesus will welcome them. 

Property. 

The first man had bought a little farm, he lived in 

the village, but his farm was in the country. Now 

he had accepted the first invitation given a long time 

before, when it did not impel them to make any sacri- 



fice or give up a pleasure, but now when' the servant 
comes to tell him that the tiible is ready he says that 
he must go out to cultivate his farm. He was cour- 
teous in his refusal but decided ; among the Arabs this 
refusal would be equivalent to a declaration of war. 
To refuse this invitation was so very unusual that the 
point of the lesson lies here; these people almost uni- 
versally accepted such an invitation with joy, and we 
refuse Christ's invitation. Rabelia's witches had eyes 
that could see things at a distance, clearly, but nothing 
that was close at hand ; men to-day have eyes the re- 
verse of these, they see so clearly the farms, or the 
business, that they cannot see heaven and eternal life 
and so they reject our Lord. • 

Business. 

The second excuse was no better than the first, the 
oxen could have waited, he could have tested them 
another time, but he said " I cannot come." The din 
and traffic in the city streets often drown the chimes 
of the church bells. The love of money, the desire for 
advancement sometimes takes entire possession of men 
and they have no time to listen to the still small voice 
which would call them back to their God. They lose 
sight of God. There is a legend of a swan soaring 
to the skies and beholding its glories, its stars and 
fleecy clouds, and returning to earth and telling the 
heron what she had seen. The heron in reply asks 
" Are there any snails there ? " " No." " Then I do 
not wish to go," was the reply. Men love the things 
of this world so, that they do not care about heavenly 
joys. 

Home Duties. 

A home where Jesus is the unseen guest, is always 
a happy home. The wife would have enjoyed going to 
the feast with her husband, but this was not the cus- 
tom, she could not accompany him, a bride must re- 
main at home, so he refused to come to the feast. A 
home without Christ is incomplete, he makes every joy 
brighter, he helps us to bear every sorrow, his love^ 
hallows our love for each other. 

A Wrong Use of Right Things. 

These three excuses were all similar ; there was no 
harm in buying a farm and cultivating the ground as 
the first did, but why should this interfere with his 
going to the feast? And there was no objection to 
the second one testing his oxen, but should he miss the 
supper on that account ? Probably there never was so 
busy an age as this, we hurry from morning till night. 



THE INGLENOOK.— Tamiary 24, 1905. 



93 



the work that should be a pleasure, is almost a torture, 
for we work until body and mind are exhausted. How 
the heart is engrossed with pleasure, the thoughts with 
money-making, and the time employed in furthering 
our own selfish ends. And is it in these things that 
we find our highest good? Have we no interest be- 
yond the present? Is it only to eat and drink and be 
pleased to-day and to die to-morrow? 

No, this invitation of Jesus is the answer to all these 
questions, come to him now, for all things are con- 
venient, you will never find a better time. Sometime 
it will be too late, then no hope of entering, is written 
over the door. Age comes on, and the heart is hard. 
Life is almost ended and the record is made for all 
time. 

" When the sun grows cold, and the stars are old, 
.'Xnd the leaves of the Judgment book unfold." 

Part II. — Missions. 

We will deviate from our usual program, so as to 
make this one part missionary. When these invited 
guests refused to come, then the servants went out in- 
to the streets and hedges and brought in the poor and 
the maimed, and the halt, and the blind, so that the 
house might be filled, and we will consider some of 
these in this part of our lesson. 

India. 

Let us think of the heathen there. You may say, 
" why go so far away, when the streets of our own 
towns and cities are crowded with the halt, the maimed 
and the blind? We do not want to forget the poor in 
our own land, God knows, their lot is hard enough, 
and there are few who go to them and tell them to 
come to Jesus. But the condition of the heathen is, 
if anything, more desperate and pitiful. They are so 
far away, and there are so few Christians to help 
them, — 300,000,000 souls in that wonderful country. 
There you will find more young men to-day, than there 
are people all told in this country of ours. 

Idolatry. 

Idolatry is the darkest, deepest and blackest, the 
most tragic thing in this world to-day. The word God 
to us means good. India does not know that ; their 
histories of gods are too filthy for us to read. Men 
there torture themselves horribly, to win the favor 
of their gods who are said to delight in this torture 
and pain and misery. How can we shut our eyes to 
all the misery that idolatry brings upon these poor 
people. 

They Need the Light. 

At the time of the full moon, thousands of Hindoos 
gather on the banks of the river Ganges, and make tiny 
reed boats, placing a little light on each and pushing 
them out into the stream. They think these will light 
the dark way of their friends, whom they have buried 
in the river. One poor heathen, watching the many 



little lights on the river, stretched out his hands long- 
ingly, and then cried, " O I it is all so dark ; we all want 
light. I hope when T ;iin in darkness, i may get a 
little light on my way." 

The Country. 

It strikes you as very, very old — burned out, sap- 
less, tired. Its people for the most part are small, 
erfeminatc. Julian Hawthorne says, ' When I 
returned home and made the statement that eight mil- 
lions of people had alrea(Jy died of famine and disease 
directly caused by famine, I was met with blank 
incredulity. Hut I know, and the missionaries know 
that it is true. Eight millions, nearly twice the popu- 
lation of London." 

Caste. 

The proud and lofty position of the Brahman, his 
priestly right, has its ground, not in moral or edu- 
cational superiority, but only in his birth. ..." A proper 
caste-man would be kinder to a vulture, a cow, pr even 
a serpent, than to a Pariah who lies before him faint- 
ing with thirst, or bleeding to death. If a Pariah 
comes into his house he not only drives him forth as an 
unclean leper, but he washes the floor which his feet 
have made unclean. 

Missionaries. 

William Carey sailed for India, June 13, 1793. He 
was accompanied by John Thomas. When they ar- 
rived in Calcutta, they were obliged to register as in- 
digo planters, and for six years they raised indigo ; 
this was the beginning of English missions. 

In 1799 Joshua Marshman and William Ward with 
others went to Serampore where they were joined by ' 
Carey. Here these three families lived at the same 
tcible at a cost of five hundred dollars a )'ear. 

'Alexander Dufif came in 1830 as the first missionary 
from the Established Church of Scotland. He was the 
most prominent missionary after Carey. 

In 1856 William Butler was sent by the Methodists 
of America, he went to the upper Ganges. He was 
followed by the great names of Butler, Parker Taylor 
and many more. 

In 1816, Adoniram Judson opens a school to teach 
the women and children of Burma. Read the life of 
Adoniram Judson. 

♦ <& ♦> 

We find a great many men and women sidetracked 
all along the pathways of life because they were not 
taught the value of good manners and of a fine, 
gracious courtesj' in their youth. The result is that 
they have grown up hard and coarse and repulsive 
in manner and have not been able to win favor or 
attract trade or business. In other words, their bad 
manners and repulsive ways have kept them back 
and handicapped their careers. 

* ^ * 

Home is the grandest of all institutions. — Spurgeon. 



li 



94 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



.11111. J OUR YOUNG PEOPLE fiiiii.- 




OUR GEOGRAPHY CLASS.— Chapter XII. 



The Mayville party had more than realized all their 
fond anticipation they had before leaving America. 
The weather was ideal ; sickness, outside of a little 
homesickness, was practically unknown to the party. 
They were all very congenial traveling companions. 
They had long since learned to reverence and respect 
the wise counsel of Miss Gertrude. She left no stone 
unturned that she thought would be beneficial to the 
class, in the way of knowledge. The teacher prided 
herself on definitions; she used to tell the class in 
school that " A definition was such a description of 
an object as would include everything concerning it 
and exclude everything else." When these four pupils 
were in the Mayville geography class, they had com- 
mitted to memory a definition of geography which any- 
one of them was able to repeat, even unto this day, 
upon being asked to do so. 

An incident happened which afforded Miss Gertrude 
no little pleasure while riding through the country 
on one of their trips : The johnny car was jogging 
along at its usual pace. The entire party was silent in 
meditation ; their eager eyes were drinking in the beau- 
ties of nature and as they passed cottage, castle, bar- 
racks and lough, Roscoe slowly said, half to himself 
and half out loud : " Geography is a description of 
the earth as the home of man." He said nothing more. 
The girls looked at each other and then at the teacher. 
In one of the proudest moments of her life, the teach- 
er said, " I am able, at least, to see some results of 
my teaching." Roscoe said that he remembered that 
from the days of the Mayville geography class, where- 
upon the teacher answered, "If we keep this definition 
constantly before us while making this tour, we will 
have gained an inestimable amount of good, because 
that is the only true way in which the peoples of the 
earth should be studied. 

It was a good thing for the party that they happened 
to meet Mr. Cullen in Dublin. The course they had 
taken from Cork led them through Limerick, Tipper- 
ary. Queen's and Kildare counties. This is a scenic 
part of Ireland. When they met Mr. Cullen, he told 
them they could not afford to miss a little trip down 
the Eastern coast, so they decided to take a couple 
days' journey to Wexford and return, which you will 
notice Marie mentions in her next letter : 

Dublin, Ireland. 
Dear Mr. Maxwell: 

I think I menlioned in my first letter of having met 
a merchant from Philadelphia; through his advice we were 



constrained to recanvass a part of southwestern Ireland, 
and we will never regret the money nor time spent. We 
started south from Dublin and passed through 'the coun- 
tries of Wicklow and Wexford, until we carne to the city 
of Wexford. This is one of the largest seaports in east- 
ern Ireland and is the capital of the county of Wexford, 
which has an area of about nine hundred square miles. 
This is the place where the English invaders landed in 
1629. It was taken by the rebels in 1641. In 1649 this 
city was stormed by Oliver Cromwell and party, and over 
a century later it is still found to be' the headquarters of 
the rebel party. So you see it has figured conspicuously 
in the history of the Island for centuries; it is a town of 
fifteen thousand inhabitants who are rather an industri-' 
ous people. 

In this county of Wexford there is a district known as 
" the Barony of Forth," which has a very peculiar people, 
and their quaint customs were simply a revelation to us. 
They are hard working, industrious peasants, living in 
thatched cottages, with scrupulously clean and white- 
washed walls, which, by their perfect whiteness, at once 
arrests the attention of the visitor. These people differ 
in many respects from the inhabitants of other parts of 
the same county and have habits and customs peculiar 
to themselves. They are firm believers in the efficacy of 
prayer for the dead. When a funeral takes place two 
wooden crosses are provided. On the way to the ceme- 
tery a halt is made at a certain spot by the side of the 
road; here prayers are said to the dead, after which one 
of the crosses is deposited under a thorn bush by the road- 
side. The procession then goes on its way, and after the 
interment the other cross is fixed at the head of the 
grave. 

This strange custom dates from time immemorial as 
may be conjectured by the pile of crosses by the road- 
side, some of which are in a good state of preservation, 
others of which have rotted away years ago. It is cer- 
tainly true of which Miss Gertrude often reminds us, 
" That one-half of the world knows not how the other 
half lives." 

We returned through the counties of Kilkenny and 
Carlow, and, as I said before, it would take a great deal 
to buy our experience back, which we would have missed 
had we not taken the advice of Mr. Cullen. Through his 
acquaintance with the people of this city, we were al- 
lowed to get into many of their homes and thereby con- 
trast the appearance of parlor, sitting room and kitchen 
of the Irish mothers and wives, with those of the Amer- 
ican homes. Through him we were permitted to visit 
many important places of interest, such as churches, 
Trinity and Phoenix Park. 

Christ's Church Cathedral is a massive stone structure, 
with an annex on the next block, connected by an arch- 
way. It was founded by an ancient king of Dublin in 
1040, but owes its completion to a Strongbow et. al., at 
a later period. A few years ago a wealthy brewer of 
the city remodeled its ruins with his own money. It is 
(Continued on Page 96.) 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 



95 



1//^ 



pTfie Q. & (a. C)ejjartme«f. [^ 



i\^\/V^ 



Who was the founder and first President of Yale Col- 
lege? 

The charter for Yale College was granted by Gen- 
eral Court of Connecticut, October 9, 1701. It was to 
be located at New Haven, but was started by Saybrook 
in 1701 and removed to New Haven Oct. 30, 1717, 
despite opposition of a minority of trustees who wanted 
to locate it at Wethersfield. It was named after Elihu 
Yale, of London, England, Sept. 12, 1718. He was 
born at New Haven, Conn., April 5, 1648, was sent to 
England to complete his education when 10 years old. 
At thirty he removed to India, where he remained 
twenty years, married, acquired a fortune, and was 
made Governor of the East India Company, and a 
fellow of the Royal Society. His donations to Yale 
College aggregated about $2,000,. He intended to give 
$2,500 more but died before doing so. His death 
occurred in England July 8, 1721. The first Presi- 
dent of Yale was Rev. Abraham Pierson, 1701-1707. 

♦ 
Is the picture of a woman's head on the U. S. silver 
dollar that of a real person, or is it only imaginary? 
How was it selected? 

It is a picture of Miss Anna L. Williams, who was 
a Philadelphia school-teacher in the winter of 1877-8, 
when it was drawn. At that time G. T. Morgan, 
the designer, was working on the sketches for the im- 
print of the then new silver dollar. Prof. Thomas 
Eakins, then of the Academy of Fine Arts, advised 
hint to Use a life study, and introduced him to Miss 
Williams, then living at Thirteenth and Spring Garden 
streets, in Philadelphia. Miss Williams possessed 
strikingly classical features, and she consented to sit 
for the drawing and her profile was used to complete 
the design of Liberty on the dollar. 

Could a woman, if nominated and elected, serve as 
President of the United States? 

The Constitution of the United States, in Article 
II., Section I., uses the pronoun " he " in referring to 
the President, but it is not likely that this would pre- 
vent a woman from serving if she were elected. 

* 

Is alcohol a food? 

About as much as sea water would be to the boiler 

of an engine. 

♦ 

What is the distance from the city of Mexico to Pana- 
ma? . I 

From the city of Mexico to the city of Panama is 
1,550 miles in a straight line. 



Please tell something about Holland, its area, popu- 
lation, government, etc. 

You can find a full account of Holland in the States- 
man's Year Book for 1904 or any encyclopedia. It 
is a limited monarchy, and the ruler is Queen Wil- 
helmina Plelena Pauline Maria. The area is 12,648 
square miles, and the population is 5,347,182, there 
being about 50,000 more females than males. The 
royal family and a majority of the inhabitants belong 
to the Dutch Reform Church, which is Presbyterian. 
The constitution grants religious liberty and complete 
social equality to the members of all religions. There 
is compulsory public school education of children be- 
tween six and tjiirteen years of age. Farming, min- 
ing, manufacturing, fisheries and commerce are carried 
on. 

* 

What is meant by longitude and latitude, and how 
much space is represented by a degree? 

Longitude is distance on the earth's surface, meas- 
ured east or west from a certain meridian. A degree 
of longitude at the equator is 69 statue miles, and 
narrows at the poles -to o. Latitude is the distance 
from the equator, measured in degrees north or south 
on a meridian. A degree of latitude measures about 
69.4 English miles at the poles, and 68.7 at the equa- 
tor. 

* 

When was Greater New York formed, and what terri- 
tory did it include? 

Greater New York was established January i, 1898, 
and included all municipal corporations and parts of 
such corporations other than counties within the ter- 
ritory covered by the counties of Kings and Richmond, 
Long Island City, the towns of Newtown, Flushing 
and Jamaica arid that part of Hempstead in Queens 
County west of a line drawn from Flushing, between 
Rockaway Beach and Shelter Island to the ocean. 

How is invisible ink made? 

An ink which becomes visible by dipping the paper 
in water and invisible as soon as it dries, is made by 
mixing linseed oil, one part; water of ammonia, 2u 
parts; water, 100 parts; stir or shake well before 
using. 

* 

Where and when was Jesse James, the outlaw, born, 
and where and when did he die? 

He was born on a farm in Clay County, Missouri, 
in 1847, ^nd was killed at St. Joseph, Mo., in 1882, 
by Robert and Charles Ford. 



96 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 24, 1905. 






If 



2^ISCEX^X—^iTX30"CrS 






;,.;».;..v.>*j^«.In 
* 






THE GEOGRAPHY CLASS. 



(Continued from Page 94.) 
now in a fine state of repairs, with its pillars of granite 
and its floors of inlaid marble. A philanthropist, namely, 
Sir George Rowe, spent one hundred thousand dollars of 
his own fortune in finishing and furnishing it, and when 
last heard from he was attending a vineyard in Spain at 
a guinea a week. We attended services at that Cathedral 
last Sunday. At the side of the church recent excavations, 
amid the ruins of one wing of the building, have dis- 
closed the fact that there is a subterranean passage lead- 
ing from this church to St. Patrick's Cathedral about one- 
half mile distant; and a sort of catacomb is formed in 
this tunnel which contains the remains of nobles, lords, 
priests and prelates of long ago. 

Many names may be read to-day upon the walls of 
these catacombs. Eternity alone will reveal the secrets 
of this dark, dismal place. This was built at an age when 
some church fathers thought that a great many things 
should be done in secret. 

A few years ago, while a tourist party was visiting 
this place, for some reason one of their party was left 
behind and the door closed upon him. He was not missed 
by the party until an hour afterwards, when they re- 
turned to release him from his prison. Upon opening the' 
door they found the skeleton of the poor man lying im- 
mediately at the entrance, his flesh having been eaten 
from his bones by the innumerable thousands of rats that 
inhabit the dismal place. 

I hate to leave you in such a dark place among a lot 
of rats, but I must close this letter. 

Respectfully, 

Marie. 
(To be continued.) 

* ♦ ♦ 

IF YOU WANT TO BE POPULAR. 



Don't contradict people, even if you're sure you are 
right. 

Don't be inquisitive about the affairs of even your 
most intimate friend. 

Don't underrate anything because you don't possess 
it. 

Don't believe that everybody else in the world is 
happier than you. 

Don't conclude that you have never had any oppor- 
tunities in life. 

Don't believe all the evil you hear. 

Don't go untidy on the plea that everybody knows 
you. 

Don't overdress or underdress. 

Don't jeer at anybody's religious belief. 



Learn to laugh. A good laugh is better than med- 
icine. 

Don't try to be anything else but a gentlewoman ; 
and that means a woman who has consideration for 
the whole, and whose life is governed by the (jolden 
Rule. — Christian World. 

♦ ♦ ♦> 

The Oxford University Press of New York have a 
fine edition of " The Oxford Self-pronouncing Bible." 
There is a Sunday-school Teacher's edition with Cy- 
clopedic Concordance, with many helps to the study 
of the Bible, all arranged in alphabetical order, so the 
mformation desired can be easily found. There are 
several excellent maps, too, and some illustrations 
so that one finds all that is needed to make a perfect 
Bible ; and being printed on fine India paper it makes 
it a convenient size, and excellent print. It has 
flexible leather binding and silk marker and leaves 
nothing more to be desired. It is so arranged that 
one very conveniently finds all the names pronounced 
as we come to them. It is a favorite Bible and every- 
one should have a copy of it. — Martha Shepard Lippin- 
cott, Moorestown, N. J. 

* * * 

OLD SAWS REFILED. 



A watched Pot never boils over. 
A Word to the Wise is wasted. 
A rolling Stone gathers much Experience. 
A Party and his Money are soon fooled. 
Modesty is the best Policy. 
A Company is known by the Men it keeps. 
Discretion is the unpopular Part of Valor. 
Time and Tide could wait for no Woman. — January 
Lippincott's. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

War is murder. — Tolstoi. 

War is hell. — Gen. Sherman. 

War is the concentration of all human crimes. — 
William E. Channing. 

The Christian churches of all nations are guilty for 
the continuance of this great crime. 

♦ <♦ ♦ 

Prince Friedrich Leopold of Prussia, son of the 
late " Red Prince Karl," has issued stringent orders 
that none of his servants in any of his residences shall 
use tobacco in any form. 



Good Land Cheap 



Let us sell you farming land where the soil is pro- 
ductive and the crops dependable ; where we have no 
drouths or failures; where grasshoppers are not; where 
we have few storms and no destructive winds; where 
products are greatly diversified; where the markets are 
as good as they are easily reached; where the climate 
is uniform and salubrious; where you will be cordially 
welcomed and helped along. We state without fear of 
contradiction that we have the best land at the least 
money, possessing more advantages and fewer draw- 
backs, than can be found in this country to-day. A few 
years' time is all that is necessary to prove that we are 
in one of the most productive areas for fruit, root crops 
and live stock. The possibilities are here, largely un- 
developed as yet; all that we want is the people. Those 
we are getting are the right kind, your own kind, and 
the country will soon be dotted with green fields and 
cosy homes. Don't get the idea that you are going to a 
wilderness; not at all; on the contrary, we have sold 
lands in our BRETHREN COLONY to over 120 fam- 
ilies, nearly half of whom are already on the ground, 
In the vicinity of BRETHREN, MICHIOAN, we have 
thousands of acres of productive soil, splendidly adapted for fruit, root and vegetable 
crops and live stock, at prices from $7 per acre upwards, on easy terms • Our lands are 
sold to actual settlers. 



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The basis of my business is absolute and 
unvarying integrity. 

SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Founder of the Brethren Colony, Brethren, Mich. 



others coming next spring. 



BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, BRETHREN, MICH., 

is Resident Agent in charge of the work at our Brethren Colony. It will only cost you a 
postal card to drop him a line for our illustrated booklet, entitled " The Brethren Colony 
in the Fruit Belt of Michigan." This will give you an accurate idea of the lands and all 
conditions surrounding them The booklet contains letters giving the opinion of many 
Brethren in regard to our lands and work. Every statement can be borne out by facts. 

Reduced rates will be furnished homeseekers desiring to look our country over and 
every opportunity will be accorded them to conduct their investigations satisfactorily 
by Bro. Miller on their arrival at Brethren, Michigan. 

For booklet, information as to rates and all details address: 



SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Cadillac, Mich., 

DISTRICT AQENT 



or 



IjiSIICLKSL 



BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, 
Bretliren, Mich., 



RESIDENT AQENT 

.i^s s o ola,t iozi. 



Matthew Henry 



Commentary on the Bible 



lE^iE^iCE c^i^zE-^Tx^-^ :E^EID-c^CEZD 



■^•"^^^^^ '^!^^^f^^^!^'^!^^!^'^f^^f^^i^*^^f^>^^ 



Catalogue 



Price, 
$15.00 







2 ♦J♦^J♦^t*♦J^^J»**♦♦J^^•H$M$t-►J»^Jl-^H^^ 



Our Special Price 

f. o. b. Elgin, 

Only $7.95 



It is surprising that, in this labor-saving and time-saving age, the ever popular Matthew Henry's Commen- 
tary has not before been issued in convenient volumes. Two features of this new edition call for special attention: 
First, the moderate size of the volumes; second, the large size of the type (larger than any previous edition). Oth- 
er features are the excellent printing and substantial binding. 

" Biblical students who are most familiar with the very best commentaries- of this generation are most able to ap- 
preciate the unfading freshness, the clear analysis, the spiritual force, the quaint humor, and the evangelical richness 
of Matthew Henry's Exposition of the Old and New Testaments. Ever since we have been engaged in the minis- 
try we have found our appreciation of this work increasing with our years." — The N. Y. Observer. 

"There is nothing to be compared with old Matthew Henry's Commentary for pungent and practical applica- 
tions of the teachings of the text." — The S. S. Times. 

We have now reduced the price of this commentary until it is within reach of all. Every minister and Bible 
student who does not already have a set of the.se books ought to take advantage of this special offer. Yon cannot 
afford to let Ihi.-; offer pass without due con.-,ideration. Better send your order at once. Price, (jnly $7.95. 



Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, Illinois. 



■THE tNGL-ElN/O'w^^'.- 




$Br QC for ihis large 
■ *^*^- handsome 
m ' steol range 

mlhoi'f 1'>B^ closet or reservoir. With 
UitiC, high, roomy, wirmiog' closet and 
rcserv-oir.Ju&t 05 shown la cut. SI 1*BS. 
Resarvoir Is porcelnln on loside, asbestos 
covered on oiiiside. Meavy cast top with 
iullsi^ccuokinc holes. LarRcrooniy oven. 
rc^;uK-^r &-18 ii^e. (We have Ostylcs ofstccl 
' cast rongcsmth mud. larger aiuism.-iM- 
cr ovco't, &i;cb to sviit all. I 
Tho body Is m.ide of cold 
rolled steel, top and nil cast- 
ing of best pit; Iron. Grolei 
wo use Improved duplex RTite, 
bums xvood or co^. NIokol 



$ 



2.95 



for ihls 

Oak 

Heatei* 



lust IL3 Illustrated. Bums 
hard or loft coal or wood. 
Has drawn center grate., 
comipated fire pot, cold 
ri)llcd sheet steel body, 
Iic.Avy castbase. Lirce cast 
feej door, ash pit door and 
ash p^n. swing top. screw 
draft -retrxilator. Polished 
urn, nickel top rlni;;, name 
plate, foot rails, etc. 

We have hearing 
stiives of every kind.' 
Mot blast, air tights, the 
kindihatrctailsfor f3.00, 
f,.r aOo. Baie burners 
at J^ tlie regular price , 



'band on fri'<nt of inala top; 
brackets and tea shelves on | 
;t; band and orn.^ment on reservoir; 
I oven door. cic. y\rc Highly polished,] 
1 makinc the ranpe an ornament to any home, 

aro tho most liberal^ 
«vermado. Wewillshipyou 

_ any ran^e or stove, guar antAeik 

it to be i>erfect I n coostructioQ and material and we guarantee it to^ 

rcnch you inperfcct condition, Vou can pay for Jtafteryou receive it. VouoanCakolt 
Into your own homo and use It SOfulOdavs. If you do not find It to be exactly as represented and perfectly satisfactory 
In every way. and the bijrccst hari;:>inin astoveyou ever saw or heard of and equal to stoves that retail for doublo ourprice# 
you can return it to us and we will pay freight both ■wav^, so you won't be Out one single cent. 

mTUI*^ "ftn" tf^^ST s"<:lsendittousand wowill mailyouour freeStovcCatalop. It explains ourterms fully, 
I niv mU UwI I tells you bow to order. Don't buvastoveof any hind until you aeloornowlflrne 




i yoi 
Stovo catalogue for 1904 and I 006 and see our 
liberal tf>rms and the lowest orices ovcrniadc. 



rlflrne 



EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY CO., Chicago, III. 

20,000 INQUIRIES 

Would come pouring through our mail this week if 
all the Brethren understO'xd just what we have. 



AN HONEST, EFFICIENT, ECONOMICAL LIGHTING 
SYSTEM FOR EVERY COUNTRY HOME. 



Acetylene Gas makes a beautifi)!, bright, white light. 
Machine simple and safe and fully guaranteed. 

Do You Want to Know More? 



ECONOMIC LIGHTING CO.. 



44t]S 



Royersford, Pa. 



Uention the INOL'^I^OOK when writina 




ornia 

Oregon and 

Washington 

Fast Through Trains Daily 

over the only double -track railway between Chicago and 
the Missouri River. Direct route and excellent train ser^ 
vice. Two trains a day to 

San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland 

Through service of Pullman compartment, drawing-room and 

tourists sleeping cars, dining cars, library and observation 

cars, buffet smoking cars and free reclining chair cars. 

Dailt/ and Personalty Conducted Excursions i 

For tickets and information apply to agents of 

The Nortli=Westerii Line 

or address 

W. B. KNISKERN 

Passer, -cr Traffic Manager 

CHICAGO 






THE 

REEDLEY 
TRACT 



The Gem of the San 
Joaquin Valley 



Embraces the Mount Campbell, 
Columbia, Carmelita, Springfield, 
Producers, Level Orchard, Kings 
River and other Colonies. These 
are among the best lands in the 
State for all kinds of fruit and 
alfalfa. Good soil, low prices, 
abundant water, healthful climate, 
perfect natural drainnge. 

Special inducements made to 
Brethren. Colony now forming. 
Write for booklet, and full informa- 
tion. Address, 

O. D. LYON, 

Reedley, Fresn-> Co., California. 




Via Dubuque, Waterloo and Albert Lea. 
Fast Vestibule Night train with through 
Sleeping Car, Buffet-Library Car and Free 
Reclining Chair Car. Dining Car Service 
en route. Tickets of agents of L C, R. R. 
and connecting lines. 

A. H. HANSON, G. P. A., CHICAGO. 



JLJ 



IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
PLEASE MENTION THE INGLT3 
NOOK. 



THI 



INGi-ENOOK. 



JOHN THE BAPTIST 



Just from the Press. 



The Tenth Book of the Bible 
Biography Series. 



Following is a list of the books now ready: 

1. Joseph the Ruler. 

2. Samuel the Judge. 

3. David the King. 

4. Daniel the Fearless. 

5. Moses the Leader. 

6. Jesus the Savior. Vol. 1. 

7. Jesus the Savior. Vol. 2. 

8. Ruth the Truehearted. 

9. Esther the Queen. 
10. John the Baptist. 



i¥til'nTnTMT'*^*^'jj*|j*'^'iJjj'^ 



Suitable 
Gifts 
for 
the 

Young 



A t f t ^ i » f » > y » > y i t^ fc^it^ t-^ * y *i^ 




BIBLE BIOGRAPHIES 




ThyWordisabmp 
unto my Feet 
and 

jAUahluntoimPaW: 
— . David 



%t(m Jie, as IMoh> 
f(' '"XhrisV'Pml 



-!^=i*K^ 



These books contain beautiful stories of the Bible char- 
acters named, in such clear and forcible, yet simple 
language, that all become intensely interested in them. 

Our Special Proposition. 

These books are illustrated, bound in cloth, with a 
handsome cover design. Price, per copy, 35 cents. Three 
for $1.00. 

We propose to make you this special proposition. By 
you stating in your order where you saw this advertise- 
ment we will send you this entire set of ten books pre- 
paid for only $2.75. Every home where there are chil- 
dren ought to have a set of these books. Parents, you 
can't afford to miss this opportunity of supplying your 
children with such helpful books. Don't delay but send 
your order at once to 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 




Charlie 
Newcomer 

BY 

W. B. STOVER 



THE FIFTH EDITION of this wonderful little volume 
is JUST OUT. 

It is an inspiration to any child to read this volume, 
and has been the means of turning many children to the 
Lord. Boys and girls enjoy reading it, and we cannot 
recommend it too highly for your boys and girls. Its in- 
fluence can be nothing but good. 

Our new edition is neatly bound in cloth and would 
please any boy or girl. Price, single copy, 25 cents; per 
dozen, $2.50. 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, 111. 



Girdling the Globe 



This intensely interesting book of travel describes vivid- 
ly Elder Miller's trip around the world and takes the 
reader along in such an easy way that you feel as though 
you were traveling over the country with him. 

This is undoubtedly the best book that Bro. Miller has 
written. It contains more than 125 illustrations and 602 
pages. 

Thousands of these books have been sold and all are 
delighted with the book. 

HALF PRICE! 

WE ARE OFFERING THIS BOOK AT HALF 
PRICEi. If you have not read this book, or if you have 

a friend that you want to make a present of a good book, 
here is your opportunity. We have a number of these 
books in stock that must move out at once to give room 
for other books. AS LONG AS THEY LAST we will 
furnish them at the following rate. 

Former price. Now. 

Substantial cloth binding, $2.00 $1.00 

Sheep binding, 2.50 1.25 

Full Morocco, gilt edge '. . . 3.00 l.SO 

Enclose 25 cents extra for each book _to pay mail or 
express charges, unless a number are ordered at one 
time, in which case we will send them to you by express 
or freight, collect. 

Send all orders to , 

BRETHREN PtJBLISHING HOUSE. 
Elgin. 111. 



THE iNQL-ENOOK. 




P 



DOUBLE UMPKIN 

DOUBLE I 

DOUBLE UMPKIN 

UMPKIN PIE 



WHY NOT COME TO THE 

LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 

FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 

Where Pumpkins, Corn and common crops grow, as well as every kind 
of California fruit? 

Come and visit the Brethren who are Jiving here and see what they have 
done in the past two years. 

Nearly 600 sales made since we put this land on the market and over 2,000 
people now living on the grant where there were but about sixty a little over 
five years ago. 

This does not look like a temporary boom, does it? Must be something 
solid behind all this. If not, five years ought to show up the weakness, but 
instead of weakening the Laguna and its various interests are growing stronger 
all the time. 

If you are thinking of coming to California to make a home you cannot 
afford to overlook this place. 

We still have plenty of good land with abundant water for irrigation. 
The price is from $30.00 to $60.00 per acre, terms, one-fourth cash, balance 
in eight annual payments. 

COLONISTS' RATES 

will again be in force March 1 to IS, 1905. 

From Chicago to Laton, $33.00 

From Mississippi River to Laton, $30.00 

From Missouri River to Laton $25.00 

Make your plans to start for California March 1st and you will be in time 
to buy land and put in a crop. 

Write us for free printed matter and local newspaper. Address 

NARES & SAUNDERS, = Laton, California. 



CANCER 

Corad without 
Surgery or 
Pain. 
Our latest 
book which 
we will send 
free of ckargt 
tells tlJaboui 
Cancer a u d 
all chronic 
and malig- 
nant diseas- 
es , and how 
they can be 
cured at home quickly and at small ez- 
liense, reference, patients cured in every 
Slate and Territory, ministers & bankers 

Addreit, Drs. Rintliirt & Co., lock Boi CD, Eokont, hi. 





I 



33tl} Hention the INGLElfOOE when irrltliis. 



Job Printing 

The Kind that Brings Re- 
sults, the Kind you needn't 
be ashamed of, the Kind 
that is Cheapest in the End 
because Just as You Want , 
it, — Furnished by 

BRSTHBEN FUBI^ISHHTQ aOUBX, 
ISlg'lii, nUnolB. 

The Inglenook 
COOK BOOK 



We have sent out thousands of 
these Cook Books as premiums. 
■So great was the demand that a 
second edition was published. 
We are still receiving numerous ■ 
calls for this Cook Book. F6r this 
reason we have decided to'dispose 
of the few remaining copies at 
25 cents per copy. To insure a ' 
copy it will be necessarj' for you 
to order at once. . . Send to 

BBETHBEir FUBI.ISHINQ HOUSE, . 
Elgin, Illinois. 

In Answering Advertisements please 
mention the Inglenook. 



EARN YOUR SUBSCRIPTION. 



For only four new subscriptions to the INGLENOOK al $1.00 each we will 
forward your time on the paper for one year. 

For only five new subscribers at $1.00 each we will forward vour time on 
the INGLENOOK for one year, and send you the FARMERS VOICE for one year. 

How Many Want to Earn their Subscription ? 

YOU WILL FIND IT AN EASY TASK. 

Sample Copies Free. -^S- TRY IT ONCE. 

Brethren Publishing: House, Elgin, Illinois. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER FOR 
MISSIONARY PURPOSES. 

The General Missionary and Tract Committee have a plan to use the GOSPEL 
MESSENGER as a missionary in a very effective way. They propose to help pay for 
10,000 SUBSCRIPTIONS outside the Brethren Church. 

THE PLAN. 

The plan for securing these 10,000 names is to allow any one not a member of the 
Brethren Church, and not living in a family where there are members, to have 
the Gospel Messenger from now until Jan. 1, 1906, for only 50 cents. 

Or anyone interested in this plan of doing- mission work may donate the paper to those 
not members and not living in families where there are members for only 50 cents 
for the year. 

This 50 cents does not by any means pay the first cost of the paper, but the General 
Missio.nary Committee have so great faith in the Messenger as a missionary factor that 
they are willing to expend considerable money on making up the deficiencA' in order to 
have the paper read by those not members of our fraternity. 

Send your order at once and the names will go on our list without delay. Cash must 
accompany each order. Always mention the fact that your order complies with the rules 
governing such subscriptions. Remember it is only 50 cents. 

Address : BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 




IKSL-E-NOOK, 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 






PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS. 






m 



POEM. 

BEYOND THE DARK CLOUDS.— By Martha Shepard Lip- 
pincott. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

AN HISTORIC Spot.— No. 7.— By H. W. Strickler. 

THE JAPS AS' PIRATES OF LITERATURE.— By Frank- 
Waldo, Ph.D. 

THE RACE PROBLEM.— By Millard R. Myers. 

THE- RELATION OF PHRENOLOGY TO EDUCATION.— 
Part II.— By H. B. Mohler, F. A. P. I. 

A PLEA FOR THE SCHOOL BOARDS.— By Maud Hawkins. 

TARDINESS IN SUNDAY SCHOOL.— By Walter Troup. 

A BUTCHER BLOCK FACTORY.— By D. Z. Angle. 

POLITENESS.— By Mrs. M. M. Bollinger. 

JOY IN LITTLE.— By Wealthy A. Burkholder. 

EDITORIALS. 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE. 



m 






^ 






m 



ELGIN. ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



January 31,1 905 



$ 1 .00 per Year 



Number 5, Volume VII 



THE rNQLENOOK. 



30,000 ACRES 



IRRIGATED 



Government Land 

In Nevada 

NOW OPEN FOR 

HOMESTEAD 



UNDER THE NEW 

IRRIGATION LAW 

The United States Oovern- 
ment Constructs the Canals, 
Reservoirs and Lateral Ditch- 
es t* the Land, and Maintains 
them for lo Years at a c«st of 

ONLY $2.50 AN ACRE 



TM* Includcf Water. After i* Years Water 
mti CaaaU BclanK ta Hoocstaader. 



ONE-WAY COLONIST'S RATES 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, March 
I to May 15. 

From Chicago, $33 00 

From St. Louis, 3° 0° 

From Missouri River 25 00 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 



Stop Off at Reno, Nevada, 

And investigate the irrigated Govern- 
ment land. Call on Mr. H. B. Maxson, 
U. S. Engineer, for information. 



Printed Hatter FREE. Write to 

GEO. L. McDONAUQH, 

COLONIZATION AGENT 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Omaha, Neb. 



...THE... 

Union Pacific Railroad 

In Connection With 

San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt 
Lake Railroad 

EXPECT TO BE RUNNING 
THROUGH TRAINS BETWEEN 
CHICAGO AND LOS ANGELES 
VIA SALT LAKE CITY EARLY 
NEXT SPRING. 



ONE-WAY COLONIST'S RATES 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, March 
I to May 15. 

From Chicago, S33 00 

From St. Louis, .' . 30 00 

From Missouri River 25 00 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 

There are opportunities in Southern 
Utah and Nevada where homes can 
be had at little expense, where no 
heavy clothing and but little fuel is 
needed, where garden truck can be 
raised in abundance nearly the whole 
year, and where the people can live 
in tents throughout the year without 
suffering from heat or cold. The new 
line of the Salt Lake Route, now 
building through to California, will 
pass through several well watered 
valleys in these states, in which can 
be grown apples, grain, potatoes, figs, 
cotton, sugar cane, tobacco, peanuts 
and many of the semi-tropical fruits. 
These valleys are surrounded by hills 
and lofty snow-capped mountains, 
which furnish an inspiring back- 
ground to the scene which greets 
the traveler who finds his way into 
the favored region. The climate is 
mild and delightful, and excessive 
heat and extreme cold is unknown. 
This is a good place for a poor man 
to get a home, the sick to find health 
and the capitalist to make good in- 
vestments. 

If you are interested in mining, 
manufacturing or agriculture, or seek- 
ing a new home in a new land, and 
desire to know more about the great 
resources of Utah, Nevada and Cali- 
fornia, write to Geo. L. McDonaugh, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Neb. 

And then stop off at CALIENTES 
and LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, to in- 
vestigate for yourself. Be sure to buy 
your ticket over 

The Union Pacific Railroad 

known as the "OVERLAND ROUTE," 
and is the only direct line from 
Chicago and the Missouri River to 
all principal points West. Business 
men and others can save many 
hours via this line. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraslca. 



Join Excursion 

(To Sterling, Colorado,) 

South 
Platte 



Valley 



AND RETURN 

First and Third Tuesday 
Each Month 

Where the Contract has been 
Let for a 

$750,000.00 BEET SU6AR 
FACTORY 

To be Erected on Land Adjoining City 

of Sterling, Bought from Mr. David 

Plum, of Maryland, Illinois. 



Only 24 hours' run to Chicago; only 
12 hours' run to the Missouri River; 
only 4 hours' run to Denver. The on- 
ly country that can make a good 
sho-wing to the homeseeker in mid- 
winter. Go and see for yourself — it 
need only take four or five days' time 
and you will be well repaid by what 
you see. Buy your ticket over 

The Union Pacific 
Railroad 

Which is knovm as "The Over- 
land Route," and is the only direct 
line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West 
Business men and others can save 
many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal to your nearest ticlcet 
agent, or GEO. L. McDONAUGH, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha^ Nebr. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebr. 



the: ingl-enook. 



P *J* *p *r*F 



Weak Stomach 
Indigestion 
Dyspepsia 

To any sufferer of the above named 
diseases will be sent a 30 days Treat- 
ment of BRAWNTAWNS (50 cents) 

on the following conditions: Use ac- 
cording to directions, one tablet aft- 
er each meal and one before retiring 
for 30 days, and if you can truthfully 
say you have not received any benefit 
and do not feel any better from the 
use of BRAWNTAWNS , your mon- 
ey will be cheerfully refunded. 

Victor Remedies Company, 

FREDERICK, MD. 



FREE SAMPLE 

)6endletterorpostal for free SAMPLE 

HMDOO TOBAGGO HABIT GURE 

We cnre joa of ehiwing and smoking 
lor 60c., or monej back. Ou&ranteed perfectly 
barmleas. Address Mllford Drag Co., Hllford, 
Indiana. _We answer all letters. 

37tl3 "entioo the INGLENOOK when writing. 

60SPEL SONGS and HYMNS 

No. I. 



Has a wonderful sale, and the book 
still LIVES. We are receiving or- 
ders daily for this book and have 
sold more than 40,000 copies since it 
has been published. There is onlv 
one reason for this. It is ."imply be- 
cause 

THE SONGS AND HYMNS IT 
CONTAINS STILL LIVK 

This book is used by thousands in 
the Sunday school, young people's 
meeting and general song service. It 
contains 208 pages and sells at 30 
cents each, or four for $1. Send 
your orders to 

BBETHBEN FUB£ISHZZrO BOUSE, 
Elgin, ZlUnolB. 




AT A BARGAIN. 

160 Acre Farm; 40 acres under ditch, 
and soedcJ to wheat. Horses, cattle, 
hogs, hay. Implements; good spring; Vi 
mile to hot spring. House, small barn, 
fenced and cross fenced. Address, 

LAFE SNYDER, 

.|t2 WEISER, IDAHO. 

500 Bible Studies 



. Compiled by : 



HAROLD F. SAYLES 



"^^M 



This new book contains 500 short, 
sharp, concise, Outline Bible Read- 
ings, contributed by prominent work- 
ers from all over the world. The se- 
lections cover a larger range of sub- 
jects, and will be very useful to one 
in private study, as well as helpful 
in preparing to conduct a meeting on 
short notice. The book will be in- 
valuable to ministers. It will be 
found very helpful in preparing out- 
lines for Bible study and for prayer 
meeting. It will prove a source of 
pleasure and profit for all Bible stu- 
dents. 

The collection is being enthusias- 
tically received, and is also sold at a 
price within reach of all. Books of 
this character, but containing far less 
material, often sell for $i:0O or more. 

The book includes a complete in- 
dex of subjects arranged alphabetic- 
ally. Note a few of the outlines: — 

JESUS IS ABI^E. 

Having been given " all power," Matt. 

28: 18, and having destroyed the 

works of the devil, 1 John 

3: 8. Jesus Is able to, 

Save to the uttermost, Heb. 7: 25. 
Make all grace abound, 2 Cor. 9: 8. 
Succor the tempted, Heb. 2: 18. 
Make us stand, Rom. 14: 4. 
Keep us from falling, Jude 24. 
Subdue all things, Phllpp. 3:21. 
Keep that committed to him, 2 Tim. 

.1:12. 
Perform what he has promised, Rom. 

4:21. 
Do above all we ask or think, Sph. 
3: 20. 
Knowing his grace and power, shall 
we not come and say, " Yea, Lord " ? 
Matt. 9:28. F. S. Shepherd. 

THE BKOOD.— Heb. 9:22. 

1. Peace has been made through the 
blood. Col. 1: 20. 

2. Justified by the blood. Rom. 5: 9. 

3. Redemption by the blood. Eph. 1:7; 
Col. 1: 14; 1 Pet 1: 18. 

4. This redemption is eternal. Heb. 9: 
11-14; Heb. 10: 10-15. 

5. Cleansed by the blood. 1 John 1:7; 
Rev. 1: 5; Rev. 7: 14. 

6. We enter into the holiest by the 
blood. Heb. 10: 19. 

7. Overcome in heaven by the blood. 
Rev. 12: 11. 

8. Then sing the song forever to the 
blood of the Lamb. Rev. 5: 9. 

Rev. J. R. Dean. 

Price, limp cloth cover, 25 cents, 
prepaid. 

BBETHBEir FUBUSHIlira HOUSE, 
El^ln, nilnolB. 




CUT THIS OUT 

Of every Nook for 
six months, send 
us the 26 LION 
HEADS .'uid we 
will send you any 
one of our sixteen 
"HOME TREATMENT" 
Remedies FREE. 
Send for descriptive list and make your 
selection. Live agents wanted. Profit- 
able business. 

RHEUMATISM CURED 

Our latest and finest remedy for 
Rheumatism, Sciatica, Gout, Stiff and 
Painful Joints, etc., is TONGA Tablets, 
which removes the uric acid from the 
blood and cures Rheumatism perma- 
nently. A trial box only 50 cents. 

VICTOR MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, 



S. F. Samger, Secy. 



SOUTH BEND, IND. 



E. C. WARD. 



HARRY W. JOHNSON. 



HOMES IN SUNNY AND RAINY CALIFORNIA 
WARD & JOHNSON, 

RACKERBY, CA IFORNIA. 

Withiii Bounds of the Bangor Church. 

2tl3 Mention the INGLENOOK when wntlns 

The HOME GEM WASHER 

AGENTS can make from 
S600.00 to $1,000.00 in 
one year selling this ma- 
chine. Special introductory 
price where I have no agent. 
Address, Wm. S. Miller, 
Meyersdale, Pa. 

52tl3Menlion the IXnLKNOOK when WTitin*. 



WANTED! 




Local agents to sell first-class 
Fruit Trees, Berries, Roses, etc. 
Liberal terms. 

E. MOHLER, Plattsburg, Mo. 



Our New 

AND BIBLE CATALOGUE 

Is Yours for the 
Asking. 



BBETHBEH FUBIiISHina HOUSE, 
Elgin, IlllnoiB. 



the: iNGLEINOOK. 




P 



DOUBLE UMPKIN 

DOUBLE I 

DOUBLE UMPKIN 

UMPKIN PIE 



WHY NOT COME TO THE 

LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 

FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 

Where Pumpkins, Corn and common, crops grow, as well as every kind 
of California fruit? 

Come and visit the Brethren who are living here and see what they have 
done in the past two years. 

Nearly 600 sales made since we put this land on the market and over 2.000 
people now living on the grant where there were but about sixty a. little over 
five years ago. 

This does not look like a temporary boom, does it? Must be something 
solid behind all this. If not, five years ought to show up the weakness, but 
instead of weakening the Laguna and its various interests are growing stronger 
all the time. . 

If you are thinking of coming to California to make a home you cannot 
afford to overlook this place. 

We still have plenty of good land with abundant water for irrigation. 
The price is from $30.00 to $60.00 per acre, terms, one-fourth cash, balaiu:e 
in eight annual payments. 

COLONISTS' RATES 

will again be in force March 1 to IS, 1905. 

From Chicago to Laton, $33.00 

From Mississippi River to Laton, $30.00 

From Missouri River to Laton $25.00 

Make your plans to start for California March 1st and you will be in time 
to buy land and put in a crop. 

Write us for free printed matter and local newspaper. Address 

NARES & SAUNDERS, ^ Laton, California. 

33tl3 ««aiion the INALEITOOK when writing. 



CANCER 

Cured withoi 

Surgery oi 

Pain. 

Our late 

ft book whic 

li we will sec 

Ifreeof chari 

f/ tells ftllaboi 

/Cancer an 

all chron 

and tna>i 

uant 'iisea 

es , and ho 

they can 1 

I cured at home quickly and at small e 

I pense, reference, patients cured in evei 

State and Territory, ministers & banke 

Address, Prs. BiBebirt & Co., lock Box C9, Eokomo, Ii 



Sent on Approval 

TO E.BSPONSIBI.B PBOPLB 




IFOUNTAIW 




Postpaid 
to any 
address 



Laughlin 

FOUNTAIN 
PEN 



Oaaranteed Flneat Orade Iflc. 

SOLID GOLD PEN 

I Totestfhemerltsofthlspub- 
llcatlon as an advertising me- 
dium we offer you choice of 

These d» 

Two «|) 

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Styles 

For 

Only 

(By regtitered mall 8c extra) 

Holder la made of the finest 
quality hard rubber, In four 
simple parts, fitted with very 
highest grade, large size 14k. 
gold pen , any flexibility de- 
•Ired — Ink feeding device 
perfect. 

Either style— Richly Qold 
Mounted for presentation 
purposes $1.00 utro. 

Grand Spedal Offer 

You may try the pen a week 
Hyou do not find It as repre- 
sented, fully as fine a value 
•s you can secure for three 
times the pries In any other 
makes. If not entirely satis- 
factory In every respect, re- 
turn It and -we zulll sendyoa 
fl.ldforlt, fheeztra 10c. Is 
foryoar trouble in virlilng as 
Mnd to show oar conftdsnce in 
the Laaghlin Pen— (Not one 
customer In 5000 has asked 
for their money back.) 

Lay this Publication 
down and write NOW 

Safety Pocket Pen Holder 
•ent free of charge with each 
Pen. 

ADDRB3S 

Laughlin Mfg. Go. 

453 Qrlswold St. Detroit. Mich. 



IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMEr 
PLEASE MENTION THE ING! 
NOOK. 



xhe: inqlenook. 



Cap Goods! 

Our bualnesB has almost doubled itaeir 
during the last year. We are sending 
goods by mall to thousands of perma- 
nent, satisfied customers throughout the 
United States. The reason Is simple. 

Oar Ooods are Reliable. Oar Variety it 
I^arg'e. Oar Prices are I.ow. 

All orders filled promptly, postpaid 
Satisfaction guaranteed or your money 
refunded. Send iis a sample order an'i 
be convinced. Write us for a booklei 
of unsolicited testimonials and new lln" 
of samples, which will be furnished fre^ 
Send Bt once to 

R. E. ARNOLD. Elgin, 111. 



LARGEST ASSORTMENT. 
BEST VALUES. 



fCAP OOODSJ 

I ' 

t 
I 

t 
t 

I 

I 



Send Postal Card for Free Sam- 
ples and Premium List. 



A. L. iiAKl'INhn, Lock°Box 144, 

WASHINQTON, D. C. 



$■7.95 




QR for ihis large 
■vv handsome 
ateel range 

..ithot'f '''ff** closet or reservoir. With 

l34^c, high, roomy, warmiag' closet and 

reservoir. jiiSt as showo io cut, SI 1*08. 

Reservoir Is porcelain oq inside, asbestus 

covered on outside. Heavy cast top with 6 

full sii-e cooking holes. Larpe roomy oven, 

regular S-lSsize. (Wehave9styles ofsteel 

and cast ranges withmuclilargerandsmall- 

er ovens, sizes to suit all.) 

Thtt body is made of cold 

rolled steel, top and all cast* 

ings of best pi? Iron. Grata) 



$ 



2— 



for this 

Oak 

Heater 



lust as illustrated. Bums 
hard or soft coal or wood. 
Has drawa center grate., 
corrugated fire pot, cold 
rolledf sheet steel body, 
heavy cast base, large cast 
feed door, ash pit door and 
ash pan, swing top, screw 
draft- regulator. Polished 
urn. niclcel top ring, name 
plate, foot rails, etc. 

Wo have heatJne 
stuves of every kind.' 
H ot blast, air tights, the 
kind that retails for $3.00, 
for aOo. Base burners 
at J^ the regular price 



OUR TERMS L- 



J we uselmproved duplex grate, 
Ifbums wood or coal. Nlokel 
' band on front of mala top; 
^ brackets and tea shelves on 

I closet; band and ornament ohreservoir; 
I oven door, etc. Are liighly polished,. 
[ making the r ange an o rnament to any home. 

•r« (h« most llboral 
ever mado. We ulU ship you 

any range orstove.guarsnle©! 

: itto beperfectln constructioaand material and weguarantceltto _ 
reach you iaperfect condition. You can pay foritMter you receiveit. Voiiemtak*lt 
Into your own homo and usell30fu3lda'/s. If you do not find Itto be exactly as represented and perfectly sat^actory 
In every way, and the biggest bargaininastoveyou ever saw orheardof and equal to stoves that retail for double our price* 
you can return itto us and we will paj&elght both ways, so vou won'tbeoutooe singlecent. 

mTUIC "An" AIITandseadittousandwowfll mailyouourfreeStoveCatalog. It explains ourtermsfullyt 
I fllw All UU I tells you how to order. Don*t buvasiove of any kind until you get oar new large 
Steve Catalogue for 1 804 and 1 906 and see our 
liberal terms and the lowest srlces overoiade* 

EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY CO., Chicago, III. 




PC 



I 



drnia 

Oregon a^^ 

Washington 

Fast Through Trains Daily 

over the only double -track railway between Chicago and 
the Missouri River. Direct route and excellent train ser^ 
vice. Two trains a day to 

San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland 

Through service of Pullman compartment, drawing-room and 

tourists sleeping cars, dining cars, library and observation 

cars, buffet smoking cars and free reclining chair cars. 

2>ai7j) and Personalty Conducted Excursions 4 

For tickets and information apply to agents of 

The North=Westem Lice 

or address 

W. B. KNISKERN 

Passencer Traffic Manager 

CHICAGO 






THE 

REEDLEY 
TRACT 



The Gem of the San 
Joaquin Valley 



Embraces the Mount Campbell, 
Columbia, Carmelita, Springfield, 
Producers, Level Orchard, Kings 
River and other Colonies. These 
are among the best lands in the 
State for all kinds of fruit and 
alfalfa. Good soil, low prices, 
abundant water, healthful climate, 
perfect natural drainage. 

Special inducements made to 
Brethren. Colony now forming. 
Write for booklet, and fuU informa- 
tion. Address, 

O. D. LYON, 

Reedley, Fresno Co., California. 




Via Dubuque, Waterloo and Albert Lea. 
Fast Vestibule Night train with through 
Sleeping Car, Buffet-Library Car and Free 
Reclining Chair Car. Dining Car Serrice 
en route. Tickets of agents of I. C, R. R. 
and connecting lines. 

A. H. HANSON. C. P. A., CHICAOO. 



IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
PLEASE MENTION THE INGLE 
NOOK. 



I Irrigated Crops Never Fail | 

I '^ I 

•"$ I T^ A H f\ '^ ^^^ best-watered arid State in America. Brethren are moving there because hot g; 

-.^ 1 l^xm.1 1 V-/ winds, destructive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- ^ 

• J mate it makes life bright and worth living. ^; 

!^ We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a ^ 

;^ change for the general improvement in your coiidition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on C^ 

•5 account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise ^ 

^5 ^"d sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions to an- &. 

f2 swer and many conditions to investigate. jj; 

^ Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad ^ 

?5 fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. ^ 

a ^" 

•5 Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all prmcipal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see ^ 

1^ for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. ^ 



1 100,000 Acres Now Open for Settlement at g 

4 Twin Falls, Idaho, under the Carey Act. g 

:5 Unlimited supply of water for irrigation and for power. A grand opportunity for the Home- g; 

^ seeker who locates on these lands. 10 years time given for payment for land and water after lands ^'. 

iS are sold. The canals and water belong to the settlers who will own and control the same. ^ 



Homeseekers' Round=Trip Excursion Tickets 

will be sold to points in Idaho on the first and third Tuesday of February, March and April, 1905. 
The rate will apply from Missouri river points and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloomington, Peoria and 
St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific from stations on their line 
in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip, plus $2.00, with 
limit of 15 days going. Return passage may commence any day within final limit of 21 days from 
date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting point. 

COLONISTS' ONE WAY SECOND CLASS tickets will be sold to above points from March 
first to May 15th inclusive. 

Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. Fine 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 



'.^ . Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 

1^ Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded .30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 

■■5 to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 

^ or March the yield would have been much larger. 

US 

;^ Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 

^ oats. 

^ Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to S pounds each, four of 

i^ the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 

■^ D. E. BURLEY, 

-a S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

!^ J. £. HOOPER, Agent, Oakland. Kansas. Salt Lake City, Utah. 

•^ Bfention the INGLENOOK wnen writlHi. 40tl3 



^ 



«4l ksl-ensok 



Vol. VII. 



January 31, 1905. 



No 5. 



BEYOND THE DARK CLOUDS. 



BY MARTHA SHEPARD LIPPINCOTT. 



No matter though we cannot see 

The dawn beyond the clouds, 
And though at first we're followed not 

By fond approving crowds, 
Keep hope and let us travel on, 

In paths we know are right, 
If we the torch bearers shall be. 

More will behold our light. 

So let us ever work and pray — 

And right will surely win, 
Though ere we reach the heaven bright, 

Come many days of sin: 
But still a brighter day shall dawn, 

When we the storms have passed, 
For sunshine always is be3'ond — 

And clouds can never last. 

Moorestown, N. J. 

♦ * * 

SNAPSHOTS. 



A yarn which is zvell spun is frequently reel fine. 

When a singer goes to " C " there is usually a great 
squall. 

* 

How to make the farm pay — give it something to 
pay zuith. 

* 

Keep your troubles to yourself. They are no good 
to anybody else. 

* 

Irrigation doesn't pay when you irrigate your system 
with beer and whiskey. 

It is not cowardly to fly from temptation. It often 
requires the highest order of bravery. 

// the devil couldn't get men to doubt the goodness 
of Godj he could never get their souls. 

// every old tnan could renew his youth, how the 
schools and colleges zvould be crowded. 



One of the saddest sights to be seen on earth is a 
wicked old man. 

* 

People who pray right never have much trouble 
about living right. 

♦ 

One of the hardest people to forgive is the one zvho 
has caught you in a fault. 

* 

There isn't a man on earth who doesn't condemn in 
others faults that he has himself. 

* 

People who think a good deal of themselves never 
han'e much trouble with the devil. 

Nothing was ever heard on this earth so full of 
pozver as the simple story of the cross. 

The man who loses his religion zvhen he is tried, 
didn't have the right kind to begin with. 

The man who does not give according to the zvay 
the Bible tells him to, does not give at all. 

An extremely short tnan should make a profit on 
what he purchases, for he certainly buys low. 

A man zvho loves whiskey and tobacco obeys the 
Scriptures in one sense — he loves his enemies. 

* 
It is never too late to learn, but the longer you put 
it off the shorter will be the term of its benefits. 

* 
What kind of a Christian is a man who is engaged in 
a business in which he cannot ask God to help him? 

" Our Father," is all the prayer we need to save the 
world, if we could but say it zvith the whole heart. 

* 

You zmll carry the effect of this year's bad habits 
into the next year, but you needn't carry the bad habits 
zvith them. 



98 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



AN HISTORIC SPOT.— No. 7. 



BY H. W. STRICKLER. 



The French and English Claims to the Trans-Alleghany 

Region. Washington's Visit to the French 

Forts in 1753. 

The written history of this section of the country 
embraced the valleys of the Monongahela and Yough- 
iogheny rivers, commencing at about the beginning of 
the eighteenth century. At that time both France and 
England were asserting their respective claims to the 
dominion of the wilderness region west of the moun- 
tains, and it was in the conflict which resulted from 
the attempts of each of these rivals to expel the other 
and to enforce their own alleged rights by the facts 
of actual possessions, which mark the beginning of 
the history of the great conflict of American freedom. 

The claim that France made to this territory was 
based on the facts that the adventurous explorer 
" La Salle " descended the Mississippi river in 1682 
and reached its mouth on the 8th of April; in that 
year he took formal possession in the name of the 
French sovereign, of all the valley of the mighty 
stream, and all the regions discovered and to be dis- 
covered contiguous to the valley of the stream, or to 
any and all of its tributaries. About sixty-seven 
years later, 1749", Captain Celeron, an officer in the 
service of the King of France, having under his com- 
mand a force of about three hundred men, penetrated 
southward to the confluence of the Allegheny and 
Monongahela rivers, where he took and confirmed the 
French possession of the valleys of these tributaries, 
burying metallic plates, duly inscribed with a record 
of the event of actual occupation. 

England, on the other hand, claimed the country by 
virtue of a treaty made with the " Six Nations " at 
Lancaster, in June 1744, when the Indians ceded to 
the British king an immense scope of territory west of 
the Royal Grant to Pennsylvania (it was at that time 
thought that the Pennsylvania boundary would not fall 
west of the Laurel Hill), coextensively with the limits 
of Virginia, which was very indefinite. At a subse- 
quent treaty in 1752, at Logstown, on the Ohio below 
Pittsburg, one of the Iroquois Chiefs, who had also 
taken part in the Lancaster treaty, declared that it 
had not been the intention of his people to convey to 
the English any lands west of the Alleghanies, but that 
they would not oppose the white man's definition of the 
boundaries. 

The " Six Nations " in council had also decided that, 
notwithstanding their friendship for the English, they 
would remain neutral in the contest which they knew 
to be immient between that nation and the French, 
both of which were now using every effort to 
strengthen themselves in the occupation of the terri- 
tory bordering on the headwaters of the Ohio. 



In the year 1750 the Ohio company, acting under an 
English charter and a Royal grant, sent Christopher 
Gist to the Ohio river to explore the country, having 
in view its occupation and settlement. In 1751 he ex- 
plored the valley down to the mouth of the Great 
Kanawha. In 1752 he represented the Ohio company 
at Logstown in a Peace Commission, deliberating with 
Col. Joshua Fry, and two other commissioners repre- 
senting Virginia, and with the chief of the Six Na- 
tions. 

Early in 1753 they began to move southward, from 
Lake Ontario, through the wilderness toward the 
Allegheny River, and, on the 21st of May, intelligence 
was received that a party of French and Indians had 
arrived at the, head of the Ohio river, or " 0-hee-yo',' 
now the Allegheny. The intelligence of the aggressive 
movement of the French, caused the English to meet and 
resist their advance. Among the official communica- 
tions addressed by the Earl of Holderness, secretary 
of state, to the governors of the several American 
provinces, was one to Governor Dinwiddle, of Vir- 
ginia, containing directions concerning the French en- 
croachment. The letter was sent by a government ship 
and reached Dinwiddie in October, 1753. 

In pursuance of instructions contained in this letter, 
the governor appointed and commissioned George 
Washington, then a youth of only twenty-one years. 
The following is a copy of the commission : 

" To George Washington, Esq., — one of the Adjutant- 
Generals of the troops and forces in the colony of Vir- 
ginia : — ■ 

I, in imposing special trust and confidence in the ability, 
conduct and fidelity of you, the said George Washington, 
have appointed you my express messenger; and you are 
hereby authorized and empowered to proceed hence with 
all convenient and possible dispatch to the part or place 
along the river Ohio where the French have lately erected 
forts, or where the commandant of the French forces 
resides in order to deliver my letter and message to him; 
and after waiting about one week for an answer you are 
to take your leave and return immediately. To this com- 
mission I have set my hand and caused the great seal 
of this dominion to be affixed, at the city of Williams- 
burg, the seat of my government, this 30th day of Oc- 
tober, in the 27th year of the reign of his majesty, George 
II, King of Great Britain, etc., etc., A. D. 1733. 

Robert Dinwiddie." 

And the following was the tenor of the Governor's 
passport. 

" To all whom these presents may come or concern, 
greeting: 

Whereas, I have appointed George Washington, Esq., 
by commission under the great seal, my express messen- 
ger to the commandant of the French forces on the river 
Ohio, and as he is charged with business of great im- 
portance to His Majesty and this dominion, I do hereby 
command all His Majesty's subjects, and particularly re- 
quire all in alliance and amity with the crown of Great 
Britain, and all others to whom this passport may come 
agreeably to the law of nations to be aiding and assist- 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



99 



ing as a safeguard to the said George Washington and his 
attendants in his present passage to and from the river 
■Ohio as aforesaid. Robert Dinwiddie." 

In his letter of instructions, the foUowing is a copy : 

" Whereas I have received instructions from a body of 
French forces assembled on the river Ohio contrary to 
the dignity and peace of our sovereign, the King of 
Great Britain. These are, therefore, to require and direct 
you, the said George Washington, forthwith, to repair to 
Logstown on the said river Ohio, to proceed to. such place, 
and after arriving to present your credentials, together 
with my letter to the chief commanding officer, and in the 
name of this Britannic Majesty, to demand an answer 
thereto. 

On your arrival at Logstown, address yourself to the 
Half King, to Monacatoocha, and the other sachems of 
the Six Nations, informing them that you have orders to 
visit and deliver my letter to the French commanding 
officers Wishing you good success in your ne- 
gotiation, aijd safe and speedy return, I am, 

Robert Dinwiddie. 
Williamsburg, Oct. 30, 1753." 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE RATIONAL WAY TO FIGHT TUBER- 
CULOSIS. 



There is probably no topic in which the community 
in genera], is more interested than in the prevention 
and cure of pulmonary consumption. 

The general fatality of the disease is greater than 
any other, fully ten per cent of all deaths being at- 
tributable to it. Its prevalence is also in due pro- 
portion. 

When viewed from a matter of fact standpoint this 
is bad enough, but still there is no reason why 'we 
should not look at the actual situation fairly and 
squarely in order to meet more intelligently the issues 
at stake. Very encouraging efforts are being made 
in such directions, and the common sense basis of them 
as given by experts deserves the widest possible 
discussion. 

The grand principle aimed at is to place the possible 
cure within the reach of all. In keeping with such 
intention the public is being educated in the proper 
■direction of purely hygienic treatment. Fresh air, 
sunlight and plain, nutritious food are easily obtain- 
able even by the comparatively poor man. 

It is high time that the individual as such should 
have a show and the overdreaded bacillus come in on 
a second class ticket. Since the useless scare con- 
cerning the universal danger of infection by this 
veritably omnipresent microbe too little attention has 
been paid to the more fundamental doctrines of pre- 
vention and cure. 

The newly found bug is as much a part of creation 
as the human being, and has come to stay, in spite of 
the defiantly belligerent manifestoes of health boards. 
If it could speak in its own behalf it would say that, 
far from being an intruder in the animal economy, 



it is a specially invited j.;uest. The susceptible per- 
son is, after all, the only one that offers it a welcome. 

The bacillus is the theory, but evidently the patient 
himself must be the fact. The higher purpose should 
be to luake the man strong enough to throw off the 
disease, no matter what its source. The same rule 
should apply with equal force to the susceptible person, 
however exposed. In both instances the germ would 
be as seed on the rock. 

Dr.' L. Flick is one of the inost recent exponents 
of these advanced views. He even goes farther than 
most advocates of the new treatment by advising 
that the patient must get fresh air, irrespective of 
weather, night and day,_ even at the expense of numer- 
ous draughts in the bed chamber. Mere climate, he 
avers, is not always a necessary factor, provided the 
victim is well fed, leads an outdoor life and keeps 
up his pluck. 

The more such doctrines are preached the better for 
the army of sufferers who look for practical help. 
While the fear of catching consumption from the 
casual victim is greatly exaggerated by various over- 
zealous health boards, it is equally true that the 
errotieous belief that the disease is incurable has also 
gained altogether too much currency. In fact, if 
such opinions were well founded not only would doc- 
tors, nurses and friendly attendants be stricken by the 
thousands, but the poor tuberculous patient would be 
branded as a common leper. 

It is a good sign of the times that broad and rational 
methods of dealing with the" white plague " are so 
steadily gaining ground and mere bacteriological 
theories are wanting in their more direct application. 
Let us continue, then, to have less scare about the 
business and more rational and better directed aims. 
The main question is, which can hold the fort, the 
microbe or the patient? We confess that our sym- 
pathies are always with the latter. Fresh air, sun- 
light, good food and plenty of pluck may yet rob the 
bacillus of all its real terrors. — The Herald. 

■*■*■♦ 
Arrangements have been concluded for a trial of 
motors from Delhi to Bombay. The prizes which are 
the gifts of several Maharajas and others are for the 
" most reliable car ;" " the car in best condition after 
the trial ;" " the car best suited to district work in 
India ;" " the car making the best performance as re- 
gards reliability, and costing not more than £500 
landed in India " and a " consolation prize." The 
journey of 880 miles is to take eight days. 

*S* *f* V 

Delightful task! to rear the tender thought, to 
teach the young idea how to shoot. — Thomson. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
The sad survivors all are gone. — Scott. 



100 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



"THE JAPS" AS PIRATES OF LITERATURE. 
" The Venerable " Graham in Japan. 



BY FRANK WALDO^ PH. D., CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 



Perhaps not all of the readers of this article will 
at once recognize that this deferential sub-title refers 
to an eminent character in literature. In fact, " the 
Venerable " Graham is none other than " Old Gor- 
gon " the name applied to Mr. Graham of " Letters 
from a Self-Made Merchant to his Son " fame, writ- 
ten by George Horace Lorimer. That the Japanese 
took these letters seriously and considered them to 
be written by a real Mr. Graham, and the " Japs " 
were by no means alone in this, will be made plainly 
evident in the course of this article. 

The wholesome advice contained in these letters 
has been widely appreciated not only in this country, 
but in foreign parts as well. England, Canada, Ger- 
many, Denmark, France and Japan each had to have 
its editions, while the wit and wisdom of its business 
precepts have made it a desirable shorthand reading 
book and even the blind have been provided with an 
edition in raised letters for their edification. But 
the most interesting of all is the free translation of 
the book by the Japanese. It was not only freely 
adopted as a piece of literary piratism but the ad- 
aptation of the text to Japanese needs is one of the 
most clever literary feats of the day. 

The Japanese edition of the book bears a most com- 
prehensive advertising title-page, an explanatory Intro- 
duction and a wheedling Preface. These are so sug- 
gestive to even our own thoughtful advertising men 
that a translation into English by a young Japanese 
student in this country is given below without much 
comment, as the book has become so well known 
through its quarter of a million copies that have circu- 
lated through the various countries in which it has been 
brought out. Those who know the book will thor- 
oughly appreciate the mistakes as well as the ingenious- 
ness of the " faked " matter intended to boom the 
book among Japanese readers. It is perhaps need- 
less to remark that the American " original " contained 
neither Introduction nor Preface, so that both of these 
as well as the Dedication are entirely of Japanese 
manufacture. 

Japanese Preface. 

1. This book is a translation of the sixteen letters 
the translator thought most instructive to our gener- 
al public, selected out of the twenty letters written 
by Mr. John Graham noted for his deep thinking and 
originality, to his son Pierrepont, and compiled by 
Mr. Lorimer, editor of the Saturday Evening Post 
of New York. 

2. The original title of the book is : " Letters from 
a Self-Made Merchant to his Son." But its literal 



translation seems rather awkward as the title of a 
book in our country so we give a free rendering of 
it and put it as : " Letters of a Successful Man : Man- 
age-in-the World Teachings and Precepts." (Advice 
about how to get on in the World.) 

3. Mr. Graham is a meat merchant. And the canned 
goods he makes have good reputation in the markets 
of the world and supply specially the need of armies 
in every nation. He raised himself in poverty, start- 
ed on the race-course of live, empty-handed, and by 
dint of his ability and perseverance reached to the 
highest position of success. He massed great wealth 
but his object is not in mere money-making. He has 
always a high notion of life and thus commands more 
respect as a man of character than a man of wealth. 

4. As our title shows, this is a book of advice for 
anyone starting in the world. In his desire to make 
his dear son Mr. Pierrepont as a man of success as he 
is, Mr. Graham wrote these letters out of his valuable 
experiences and observations of thirty years, with 
zeal and love of a parent, and so they are most fitted 
for our time. If a young man will read this he will 
find a way to succeed in life : if parents read this, they 
will know how to instruct their children : if our edu- 
cators read this, they will be benefited to see how a 
man of character is made. And this is why we trans- 
late the book and offer it to our countrymen. 

5. The letters in this book were not written with 
any idea of being made public. [Ohj truthful Japanese 
editor!] So we omit such parts only dealing with 
the writer's household affairs and having no instruct- 
ive value to the general public. And then as the let- 
ters cover a long period from Pierrepont's still be- 
ing in Harvard till long after his entering in business, 
if the reader does not know the real circumstances un- 
der which each letter was written, the advice contained 
in it cannot be brought home. ' So the translator man- 
aged to give a brief note of the circumstances at the 
beginning of each letter, for what he knows. 

6. In America the original has already reached the 
iSth edition. And when reprinted in England 300,000 
copies were sold at once. 

7. Recently when a certain noted bookstore in New 
York took vote for the six most popular books in 
America at the present, this book stood at the head of 
the list. 

8. Large stores in America and England adopted 
the book as reader for their young employees. And 
one large house in London bought 10,000 copies to 
make Christmas presents of them to its clerks. 

9. At present it is a shame for a young man in 
America and England not to know about the book and 
a certain paper even went so far as to say that if 
one fails in business, its main cause must be sought 
in one's neglecting to read the book. 

10. The original being in the style of pure letter- 



THE INGLENOOK.— Jamiary 31, 1905. 



lOI 



writing, it is quite full of slangs in common usf in 
America, which are hardly to be understijod. The 
translator managed to get rid of this difiiculty by 
Japanizing expressions and at the same time, tried to 
retain the happy flavor of the original. He, however, 
greatly regrets that in many cases his endeavor has 
fallen short of his desire. The Translator. 

Japanese Introduction. 

At the beginning of the Chinese trotible, when the 
news of the uprising of the Boxers readied Europe, 
Russia, seeing at once the seriousness of the situation 
telegraphed to Chicago in America and sent orders to 
a certain firm in that city to immediately ship canned 
meats for military use. There are no great nations 
in the world. I believe, which can mobilize a large 
army in a short time without a supply of military 
provision from Chicago. Chicago is now the largest 
and most flourising manufacturing place for canned 
meat in the world. According to recent statistics, 
the number of cattle killed for that purpose in a year 
is 15,000,000 heads and the area of the warehouses 
for stowing meat covers over forty acres. And Mr. 
John Graham, the preceptor in this book, is indeed, 
one of the most influential manufacturers of canned 
meat in that city. 

The canned goods made in his firm are sold exten- 
sively in both hemispheres and the name of Graham 
is much spoken of among the Western people especial- 
ly since the publication of this book. But to most of 
our countrymen, it may sound rather new and so it 
will not be a vain task to give here a brief sketch of 
his life. 

Mr. Graham raised himself in life from a boy in a 
dry goods store. As he first went into the world 
he had no friend, no acquaintance, no one to render 
him help. And on his part, he had no fund, no edu- 
cation, no training, in short, no weapon needed for 
earning' livelihood. Indeed, he launched out bare- 
handed. He could not rely on others : so he had to 
rely on his independent self. He could not rely on 
a weapon : so he had to rely on his desperate strength. 
Such was the circumstances under which he struggled 
to build his fortune. 

But he had spirit of self-reliance, great ambition, 
unswerving perseverance, pure character and strong 
will. Especially he had determination not to shrink 
from any sort of trouble or labor. And at the start 
of his life he was miserable enough to receive a 
very low salary of only two dollars a week at a dry 
goods store, to work hard for eighteen hours a day, 
and by night to have a cold sleep in a corner of the 
office. Again he peddled far in Egypt [The Japanese 
have evidently never heard -of Cairo, Illinois.^ and 
wandering lonely in the hot country of pyramids, en- 



dured extreme hardship. But all the while he was in- 
dependent and self-helping, and mustering all his 
strength, he could raise himself to a high position he 
holds to-day. A man of such a life, whatever his rank 
or profession may he, is worthy of our utmost respect. 
The .Vmericans honor him by calling him the " Vener- 
able Graham." 

He has a " gem in his palm " (a very dear child) by 
the name of Pierrcpont. The father sent him to school 
and at last had him graduated from Harvard, the best 
university in America. 

When Pierrepont came cnit of the university, 
Graham placed him at once at the lowest position in 

his office He spared no trouble to make 

his son a man. And drawing from the inexhaustible 
store of his experience and observation, gained from 
his hard struggle, sat down to write these letters of ad- 
vice and precepts. 

There are many books of advice to young men, and 
books recording experiences of men of success. But 
most of them are not well fitted for the practical 
purpose, some being out of date, some too abstract, 
and some too monotonous. No other, indeed, contains 
such fire of zeal and love as we meet in this book of 
Mr. Graham. The sixteen pieces in this collection are 
not more than occasional letters but it is remarkable to 
find such variety in style ranging from mildness of 
spring wind to severeness of autumn frost, from hur- 
riedness of a cataract to the gentleness of a leisurely 
stream. Here we have words of reprimand, eulogy, 
satire and humor, and stories of the writer's youthful 
dreams or failures of his acquaintances. And the 
whole feeling being sincere and devoid of any frivo- 
lousness the pages are strong with words almost alive 
with fire. 

Let the book itself tell its worth. I have only given 
some sketch of Mr. Graham's life and told how he 
came to write these letters to his son. There is, how- 
ever, one thing of which I can not remain silent. It 
is that Mr. Pierrepont Graham who was instructed 
through the letters, is now grown to be a man of in- 
dependence and self-help and is one of the foremost 
young business men in Chicago. 

Isamu Ishii, 
" The Industrial Japan." 

Japanese Dedicatory Note. 

To make the thought of Gyo (the Chinese sage) as 
our thought and to act the acts of Gyo is to become as 
Gyo. The man we need most pressingly in our country 
to-day is a gentlemen useful and worthy of respect as 
the Venerable Graham. If our countrymen make the 
thought of the old man as their thought and act the 
acts of the old man, they will be all Grahams. The 
wealth of America or the power of England, what do 
we care for ? It is our great honor to translate such a 



102 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



good and useful book. On publication we thank for 
the kindness of our esteemed friend Mr. Hantaro 
Minegishi who sent us the valuable original from far 
America : we thank for the trouble of Mr. Morimer, 
editor of the New York Post, who compiled these 
valuable letters : and especially we thank for the will- 
ing consent of the Venerable Graham to make public 
his valuable advice, and for the invaluable benefit he 
contributed to us by doing so. We respectfully present 
the book one cop)' each to the three gentlemen. 

Giichi Masuda, 
Proprietor, the " Industrial Japan." 

There is space to call attention to only a few of the 
points dwelt upon by the Japanese editor in these intro- 
ductory pages. We are so glad to learn, what Mr. 
Lorimer had withheld from us, that the youthful and 
inexperienced Pierrepont has profited by the advice 
of his father " and is (now) one of the foremost 
young business men in Chicago." Doubtless this last 
information coming even from a Japanese source, al- 
though their recent war telegrams show that this 
source is not always reliable, will cause the still youth- 
ful Pierrepont to be deluged with begging letters as 
was his respected father upon the first appearance of 
the " Letters " in this country. 

It is as well perhaps that we should sufficiently re- 
cognize the abilities of the Japanese to enlarge state- 
ments. I have seen it authoritatively given that about 
fifty thousand copies of this book sold in England, 
which indicates the Japanese exaggeration of six-fold 
in this instance. And the department stores in Chi- 
cago and New York dwindle into insignificance when 
we learn from the Japanese that, a single house in 
London has ten thousand clerks on which to bestow 
copies of this book whose precepts they are all urged 
to adopt. It is true, however, that business men have 
bought the book to give to employees whom they 
thought could profit by the advice contained in the 
book. 

One thing is certain, the presentation copy of the 
Japanese edition sent to the Venerable Graham must 
be lying around somewhere in the " dead letter " office. 

So much for the skillful introduction of the book 
to its Japanese readers. But the ingenuity of the 
editing translator in adapting the text of an up-to- 
date, pungent, slangy, ultra American book to suit the 
reverential spirit of Japan is perhaps without a parallel 
in translation. The following examples of the orig- 
inal and the Japanese " Translation " are illuminating 
on this point and are placed side by side to avoid mis- 
■ indentification. Permission has been obtained from 
Small, Maynard, & Company, to reproduce these small 
sections of " Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to 
his Son," but as the publisher of the Japanese " ver- 
sion " has not withheld the right of translation a little 
of his matter is used without specific authorization. 



Extracts From Original Text and Japanese 
Translation. 



Original. 

Your letter of the seventh 
twists around the point a 
good deal like a setter pup 
chasing his tail. But I 
gather from it that you 
want to spend a couple of 
months in Europe before 
coming on here and getting 
your nose into the bull- 
ring. 



What every man does 
need once a year is a 
change of work — that is, if 
he has been curved up over 
a desk for fifty weeks and 
subsisting on birds and bur- 
gundy, he ought to take to 
fishing for a living and try 
bacon and eggs, with a lit- 
tle spring water, for dinner. 



It is never easy to get a 
job except when you don't 
want it; but when you have 
to get work, and go after 
it with a gun, you'll find it 
as shy as an old crow that 
every farmer in the country 
has had a shot at. ■ 



There is no excuse for 
every mistake a man can 
make, but only one. When 
a fellow makes the same 
mistake twice he's got to 
throw up both hands and 
own up to carelessness or 
'cussedness. 



Japanese Translation. 
On reading through your 
letter of the 7th's date, its 
minute-closeness made me 
almost agonize to get its 
main ideas. After reading 
carefully over and over I 
came to find slowly where 
the desire of your honor- 
able self lay. In short, 
your honorable self wants 
to make a tour in Europe 
for two months before tak- 
ing business up at my hand- 
place (-side,) I guess. 
***** 

Any person must change 
his work once a year. If 
he is following (engaged 
in) the work of leaning' 
over the desk for fifty 
weeks and is eating fowls' 
flesh and drinking wine, he 
needs to take up fishing 
next and make food of mut- 
ton, eggs and well-water. 

Outside the time when 

your honorable self does 

not need it, it is not easy to 

get a job. On facing the 

time when your honorable 

self must find a job, if your 

honorable self tries to 

shoot and take it with a 

small gun in hand, the job, 

just like an old bird often 

escapes to be shot, cannot 

be approached easily. 
***** 

Man is not a being who 
never falls into a mistake. 
Mistakes are not always to 
blame deeply; but when 
one does again the same 
mistake, one has no word 
to give reason for it. One 
has only to apologize for 
one's carelessness with 
one's body flat and head 
low. 



■* * ♦ 
THE RACE PROBLEM. 



BY MILLARD R. MYERS. 



We had scarcely taken our seats in the coach, until a 
noticeable board attracted our attention which read : 
" This compartment for white passengers." We had 
never seen such a sign before. We were in Northern 
Illinois. White folks ! -Black folks ! The race prob- 
lem ! Why should the signboard be there ? The rea- 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



103 



son for it was, this was a north and south road which 
extended across the hne, south of which the races do 
not mix. 

We were on the North and South division of the 
lUinois Central Railway, aiming to intercept their 
through passenger service from Chicago to Omaha, be- 
cause of their superb service, rapid transit and good 
connections. 

The Southern part of our great Commonwealth have 
a race struggle of increasing gravity. What must we 
do with the negro or what will he do with us must be 
asked constantly and answered properly and practical- 
ly. The suggestions to " ship him to an island " is 
about as practical as the other suggestion to " eat-him- 
up." In reply to the latter suggestion I heard a prom- 
inent colored bishop say on the platform that if the 
person who made the suggestion would carry it out he 
would have more brains in his belly than he had in his 
head. This statement no doubt contains about as much 
truth as humor, for the Negro race of our day repre- 
sents a reasonable amount of brains. 

Considering that but two generations ago he was 
only a beast of burden his enlightenment and culture 
is to-day little less than marvelous. I do not overlook 
the fact that there is a multitude of ignorant, shiftless, 
black trash which generations of culture only can re- 
move, and that these people must be kept socially in 
their places, yet I have no sympathy with any plan of 
extinction, persecution, or injustice. 

Years hence the world will recognize the great 
work now being accomplished by the large-hearted, de- 
voted educator, Booker T. Washington, on the old 
■' Squeers " method of learning to do by doing. At 
the same time all men will honor the president of the 
United States for daring to eat a meal with a black 
man, thereby recognizing that color should be no bar' 
to reward of merit, and that " A man's a man for a' 
that." 

The lily-handed dude, the aristocratic boss, the 
worthless white trash or any other creature who seeks 
advancement on the strength of family history or 
wealth, or tries to live on charity without labor, should 
fill the mind of every patriot with genuine disgust. I 
believe in giving honor to whom honor is due, and 
tribute to whom tribute is due. 

I am frank to confess that among my friends are 
several real southern born and bred ladies and gentle- 
men who love the negro servants more genuinely than 
I can ever hope to. They speak of the dear old negro 
mammys almost as tenderly as their own mothers, 
yet they would not ride in the same coach 
or eat at the same table with her or her son. They 
also tell me that we northerners know nothing 
about the negro problem. Well, may be we don't 
know as much as we should, but the principle 
of justice to all, under the constitution of free 



America is a simple legal principle as well as a reli 
gious obligation. 

♦ * * 
TRAINED TO CROW. 



Great preparations are being made in the northern 
districts of France for a cock-crowing competition, 
which is to take place in Paris next month. 

The French Bantam Club has made the discovery 
that the best crowing cocks are those whose hens are 
the best layers, and for the time being cockcrowing 
seems likely to oust cockfighting as a popular pas- 
time. 

Owners take immense pains to make their cocks 
crow well. One gentleman, who is hoping to take a 
prize at the competition, has two very fine birds, which 
he keeps in cages in his stable. The cages are so cov- 
ered over that, though there is plenty of air, no light 
can penetrate. 

Every day the cages are taken out into the open air, 
and the covering suddenly removed, when the cocks 
immediately begin to crow loudly under the evident 
impression that they have overslept themselves and 
that the dawn is far advanced. 

After a quarter of an hour of this exercise the birds, 
who must consider the days extremely short and the 
nights extremely long, are taken back to the stable 
and covered over again. This goes on for several 
weeks before the competition, and increases the bird's 
desire to crow long and loudly every time he sees the 
light. 

The birds are fed in a special manner peculiar to 
each owner, the secret of which is jealously guarded. 
For three weeks prior to the competition the food is 
carefully dosed, and made as stimulating and exciting 
as possible. The bird is then sent to the show. Dur- 
ing the crowing contest a timekeeper with a chronom- 
eter stands in front of each bird, and marks the 
number of crows and the variations of notes in a 
given time, generally 15 minutes. 

♦ ■♦ ♦ 
TOBACCO AND HEARING. 



A PAPER read at the recent Congress of Otalgy, 
held at Bordeaux, France, by M. Delie, dealt with 
the effect of tobacco on the auditory sense, and in it 
was described the injurious effect on the patient's 
hearing. There is a direct action, due to tobacco, on 
the auditory nerve, and the stimulating effect of the 
nicotine on other nerves is likely to add further 
complications, so that tobacco should always be used 
in moderation and especially where trouble with hear- 
ing is being experienced, and patients should be 
warned at an early date. In fact, there are certain 
conditions of the tissue when all smoking should be 
forbidden^ and especially where the patient is com- 
paratively young. 



I04 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



THE RELATION OF PHRENOLOGY TO 
EDUCATION.— Part II. 



BY H. B. MOHLER, F. A. P. I. 



The efficient teacher, whether in reform, missionary 
or educational work, should be acquainted with relative 
conditions of body and brain and many modifications 
of temperament and cerebral development, he then will 
know which faculties are too active and which 
are too weak, and where stimulus should be applied or 
withdrawn as is necessary, and thus bring the mind up 
to a higher standard and better balance of power. 

Nowadays it becomes an absolute necessity for the 
teacher to know what course of study is adapted to the 
peculiar needs of the child — what subjects, topics or 
illustrations are naturally calculated to excite the vari- 
ous faculties to action. Herein, however, many teach- 
ers are not adapted, as their partial development can 
produce only partial skill. Our Creator has endowed 
us with faculties each for a special function and they 
all have a definite location, both relative and absolute, 
in the cerebral mass. Those however, who are igno- 
rant of phrenological principles, deny the localization 
of brain organs which is as inconsistent as to deny the 
location of the stomach, heart or lungs as fixed centers. 

We must admit that development does take some 
form, and it's a " law of development " that every ani- 
mal (man admitted) showing peculiar " traits of char- 
acter " has a corresponding peculiar contour of brain 
and cast of head. Admitting that the growth of brain 
organs evolve from a fixed center (the medulla oblon- 
gata), the skull necessarily must adjust its contour to 
the variations of development within. Sir Charles 
Bell in his anatomy truly says : " The bones of the head 
are moulded to the brain and their peculiar shapes are 
determined by the peculiarity in the shape of the brain." 
But from this my dear reader dare not concede the 
idea of " bumps." The " bump theory " has been ex- 
ploded years ago and now the " laiv of development," 
the " lazv of localized centers are immutably fixed so 
that the power of any given faculty is determined by 
its length to any given point from the " auditory mea- 
tus " ascertained by measurement. 

The simple arrangement of the executive, social, in- 
tellectual and moral groups, and as independent facul- 
ties, make this science easy in application and surely 
shows the perfection of divine workmanship. The pe- 
culiar fitness and harmony of location and function is 
marked. In the animal economy of nature we see- 
those faculties, intended to serve our physical wants, 
clustered within the base of the brain which corre- 
spondi;igly has the lowest function in the scale of 
mentality. In all carnivorous animals like the lion, 
tiger, wolf, dog,' etc., there is a marked development 
giving width above and about the ears, this being a 



striking proof of an established law that also holds 
good in the herbivorous and omnivorous kingdom. 

A little higher up in the scale of mentality and func- 
tion we find the social faculties clustered within the 
occipital brain. While some of the carnivorous ani- 
mals can be tamed and subdued in a way, yet we con- 
cede that the social forces in their primary relations 
in man, have a distinct higher function which is de- 
signed to modify and subdue his lower physical facul- 
ties and imbue him with friendship, attachment, filial 
love, patriotism and all the ennobling elements of an ex- 
alted social nature. As we approach the intellect we 
reach still a higher domain of power. These faculties 
being located within the anterior brain lobe are func- 
tionally vested with activities that bring man in touch 
with the " higher laws " of his being relating to his 
natural and spiritual interests. In the realm of art, 
science, philosophy, invention, legislation, and civiliza- 
tion these forces give man pre-eminent power and with 
his will and spiritual forces give him his " free moral 
agency." 

Not long since in a discussion (entertained before 
the Star Science Qub,) with a doctor of our town, 
the principal of the high school took issue on the three 
"grand divisions" of faculties the doctor made but it 
proves to be strikingly correct. 

Hell, earth and heaven were the terms applied to the 

base, central and top-head — and it must be admitted 

that man's spiritual nature emanates from his spiritual 

faculties located in the top-head — these indeed involve 

the highest function of his being because their activities 

are the embodiment of his "divine nature." These 

" spiritual faculties "■ God has ordained for his glory 

and honor which identify us as his children, when 

we live obediently to their dictates. 

(To be continued.) 

* 4* * 

THE POOR OF BERLIN. 



" What/' I exclaimed in Berlin, " are there no poor 
in this city? Are you altogether without rags and 
wretchedness ? " 

" My dear friend," said the German, winking a 
heavy eyelid, " we are very clever people. We do not 
show our dust bins." 

Berlin is ruled by municipal experts. It has its 
wretchedness and its despair, but these things are not 
permitted to increase. To be out of work in Berlin is 
a crime, even as it is in London, but with the differ- 
ence—in Berlin the municipality legislates for labor in 
a fashion which makes idleness all but indefensible. 

The laws to this end may not commend themselves to 
English minds, for the Germans are not soft hearted 
in such matters, but they have this engaging recom- 
mendation, they succeed. Let a ragged man make 
his appearance in Friedrichstrasse or the Lindens or in 



THE INGLEXUOK.— January 31, ujo-,. 



10: 



any of the numerous open spaces, and a policeman is 
at him in a minute. " Your papers ! " demands the 
man of law. The beggar produces his documents. If 
it is proved that he has slept in the asylum for the 
homeless more than a certain number of nights he is 
forthwith conducted, willynilly, to the workhouse and 
made to labor for his board and lodging. 

Now, the workhouse in Germany is not a prison, 
but the vagrant would as lief go to the one as the 
other. The administration of the workhouse is con- 
ducted with iron severity. Every ounce of bread 
and every drop of thin soup consumed by the work- 
house man is paid for a thousandfold by the sweat of 
his brow. So it comes about that the man least dis- 
posed to work, the born vagabond, finds it more agree- 
able to toil for his bread in the market than to fall into 
the hands of a paternal government. 

Berlin takes advantage of the system in Germany 
which numbers and tickets every child born in the 
fatherland. No man can roam from district to district, 
changing his name and his life's story with every flit- 
ting. He is known to the police from the hour of his 
birth to the hour of his death. For a few pfennigs I 
can read the history of every person in Berlin. There- 
fore the municipality has an easy task. Every citi- 
zen's life story is known to them, and every vagrant is 
punished for hi-, crime against the community. 

Moreover, every person of humble means is insured 
by the state. Even clerks, shop assistants and servants 
are compelled to insure against sickness and against 
old age. This insurance is effected by the pasting into 
a book of certain stamps every week, and it is the duty 
of each employer to see that this contract is faithfully 
obeyed. And the state has at Beelitz an enormous 
sanitarium costing 10,000,000 marks (£500,000), 
where the invalid citizen is sent with his pension in 
order to expedite his valuable return to the ranks of 
the wage earners. It pays the city of Berlin to nurse 
its sick and cherish its invalids. The whole object of 
the municipality is to secure the physical and intellec- 
tual well being of its citizens, and on this task it con- 
centrates its labors with amazing energ}\ 

Berlin has a huge building resembling a factory 
where the unemployed, whole families, are received 
and provided for, but no one must take advantage of 
this hospitality more than five times in three months. 
Consider this point of view. If you are homeless five 
times in three months you are dubbed a reckless 
creature and packed ofif to the workhouse. Private en- 
terprise has provided another asylum where the home- 
less may come five times in one month and where the 
police are not allowed to enter at night. I have visited 
this place and seen the people who attend it, some de- 
cent enough, others criminal in every line of their faces. 
There are many of these desperate men in Berlin, many 
of these dirty, ragged and unhappy wretches, doomed 



from the day of their birlli, but they flare not show 
themselves in the decent world as they do in London. 
They slink into these asylums at 5 o'clock ; they have 
their clothes disinfected ; they cleanse themselves under 
shower baths ; they eat bread and drink soup, and then 
they go to bed at 8 o'clock like prisoners to their 
cells. 

Now, this system is a hard one, for when once a 
man gets down in Berlin it is almost impossible for him 
to rise. But it has this clear advantage — everybody 
feels that it is better to work than to fall into the hands 
of the law. 

Rags and misery dare not lie about in the parks or 
scatter disease through the crowded streets. If there is 
any virtue in the unemployed the state will certainly 
develop it as well as it is possible to do so. There is a 
central bureau for providing men with work, and 
when a man knows that not to work means the work- 
house he solicits employment here and elsewhere with 
such a will as almost compels wages. In one year 
the state has secured employment for 50,000 men. 

The citizen is provided with sanitary dwellings, with 
unadulterated food, with schools and technical col- 
leges and with insurance for sickness and old age. For 
a penny he can travel almost from one end of Berlin to 
the other by electric tramway or electric railway. His 
streets are clean, brilliantly lighted and noiseless ; his 
cafes and music halls are innumerable. He lives in a 
palace. And all this is the result of municipal govern- 
ment by experts instead of by amateurs. — London 

Mail. 

'^ ^ '•S/t 

A BRITISH PHANTOM. 



The project of digging under the English Channel 
has raised a storm of objection in Great Britain. 
Every time the scheme crops up the same criticisms 
are leveled at it. Mathieu's proposal, made in 1802, 
which received Parliamentary sanction both in France 
and in England, came nearest to realization. The plan 
has again been proposed, and seems no nearer reali- 
zation than before. M. Peltereau in an elaborate report 
shows how commercially advantageous it would be to 
England and France. Englishmen, however, have re- 
ceived the French advances with anything but cordial- 
ity. Admitting the economic advantages which would 
result, and the comparative ease with which modern 
engineers could build the tunnel, they deplore the mor- 
al effect on the British nation, whatever that moral 
effect may be. Fears are expressed that a powerful 
army would steal through the tunnel and invade Eng- 
land with the utmost ease. The absurdity of the ob- 
jection hardly deserves comment. 
* * * 

Sloth makes all things difficult, but industry all 
easv. — Franklin. 



io6 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



ROUNDUP OF CATTLE. 



In that part of Colfax county, New Mexico, where 
the foothills of the Raton mountains border along 
the rolling prairies is the ranching community of 
Chico Springs, which derives its name from the lit- 
tle springs that flow from these rocky foothills. Chi- 
co is the Indian word for little, says a correspondent 
of the Neiv Haven Register. The general store and 
post office is a small log building connected with the 
house of Mountain Spring ranch. The next house 
is a mile away, and the rest follow in the order of 
two, four, eight and sixteen miles, and, therefore, it 
is easy to be seen that great events do not follow on 
each other's heels in very quick order, and the sight 
of a team going along the prairie road generally is 
enough to call forth the field glasses to find out who the 
travelers are. For weeks we had been looking for- 
ward to the big roundup. A great amount of the land 
in this country is government land, and is used only 
for cattle and sheep raising. Once a year the cattle- 
men round up their cattle, sort them, brand the calves 
and, after counting all 'their stock, turn them out 
again on the government land. Naturally the cat- 
tle get scattered over some extent of ground, and the 
ranchers and cowpunchers may be away five or six 
weeks. When they return each ranchman sorts his 
cattle from the rest and takes them home, but they all 
turn in and help each other brand, with no thought 
of pay. 

How Branding is Done. 

Most of the branding is done in corrals, but this 
year the largest herd was to be done out on the prairie 
in the old-fashioned way. Of cows and calves there 
were in all about 1,200. All night long the mounted 
cowpunchers had been taking turns of four hours' 
watch to keep the herd together. 

A cowpuncher's day is from sunup to sunset, and 
after an early breakfast they began to get the fires 
and irons ready for the branding. We started for the 
scene about 8 : 30 in the morning. The branding 
was to be done at what was called the big lake. 
East it would have been called a pond, but you mustn't 
tell a westerner so. We had a fine ride of eight miles 
on the prairie following the base of the foothills. 
What the country lacks in inhabitants it makes up in 
scenery, and I don't suppose there is a finer climate 
in the world. No matter how hot the day there is 
always a breeze, and the atmosphere is entirely free 
from any depressing humidity. To our left were the 
foothills as high as any mountain in Connecticut, and 
among the hills is a crater with a big part of one side 
torn out, and all over the country are pieces of black 
lava. The hills are of sandstone and the rock crops 
up in curious peaks, ledges and regular palisades. 

Like the Sphinx. 
Standing like twin sentinels, their peaks, 3,000 feet 



above the prairie and as near alike in appearance as 
ever bluffs can be, are the Temples peaks. From their 
peaks a third down they are of sandstone, all seamed 
and cricked in perpendicular crevices, the earth then 
slanting away to the prairie, and they made me think 
of the sphinx keeping watch, their faces turned to 
the east. A mile farther on was another bluff of 
exactly the same formation but facing the south. I 
looked at these grand formations and then at the little 
prairie flowers at the roadside and thought of the in- 
finite detail of the creation. 

A low hum like that of a trolley car in the distance 
told us that we were near the roundup. Then soon we 
came in sight of it. There were the cows and calves 
herded together in one big, round group, all moving 
round and round, looking for freedom that seemed 
so near, all lowing and bleating, that of the cows 
seeming more like moaning than lowing. Round 
and round they went, always moving, and around them 
keeping vigilant watch went the mounted cowpunchers 
keeping the herd together in a compact form. Once 
in a while a cow would make a desperate break for 
freedom, and then after her would go a cowpuncher 
to persuade her to return, and one was apt to see some 
fine riding. I never knew what horseback riding was 
until I came west. Ease, grace, strength and the horse 
and rider one in every motion. 

Chase for Runaways. 

Sometimes it would be a calf that broke for — he 
knew not where. With a bleat of derision and kinked 
tail he started, often giving the horse a hard chase, 
and it wasn't easy to persuade him to go back, for 
a calf is as perverse as a burro. He often proved to 
be an " artful dodger " and it was interesting to watch 
the cowmen turn and wheel their horses while going 
full speeed in following him. 

Into that herd of excited cattle went the mounted 
roper, swinging the noose end of the lariat round and 
round by his right hand holding the coil in his left. 
Then out the rope would go. He seldom missed and 
then out of the herd toward the fire he came dragging 
his victim. Pitiful as it was, it was laughable, for 
if the rope caught the calf around the neck as it should 
and generally did, he came hopping along, pulling 
back on the rope with all his strength, bleating, twist- 
ing and kicking, but making good time, for the horses 
carne in on the run. Then two men seized him, lifted 
him up from the ground and, each throwing a knee 
under his side, his feet flew up in the air and down he 
came, thump ! on the ground, with a man kneeling on 
his neck, holding his forelegs back, another pulling his 
hind legs back and then he was earmarked, for in 
this country cattlemen have to have a registered ear- 
mark as well as a brand. It generally consists of a 
piece cut out of the ear. Then came the branding. 
When the iron struck the calf it bleated pitifully. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



107 



Sometimes Break a Leg. 

There is an art in hrandinj;-. The burn must not 
be too light or -too deep, and all I can say of it is, 
it is over in a minute, and then the calf jumps up 
and runs for the herd to find its mother and tell 
her all about it. As soon as they throw a dalf they 
take the rope ofT its neck, and the roper goes back to 
the herd for another. He is not always successful 
in roping the animal around the neck-. Sometimes 
the rope goes around the neck and one fore leg, and 
in he comes on three legs. Sometimes the rope would 
go around the body or the calf would trip and fall, 
and in either case the poor thing would be dragged 
in on his side from the herd to the fire, a distance of 
150 yards, the horse going at a good speed, a sort of 
slow lope, for there is no time to lose. Once I saw a 
■poor calf sliding in with his head under him. I surely 
thought his neck was broken, but the only accidents 
that day was two calves with broken legs, and as 
thev branded nearly 600 it was a small number, consid- 
ering how they were handled. The cattle were of the 
long-horned Texan variety, known as the Hereford 
breed and were beef cattle. Such roundups as that are 
becoming more and more scarce, and, like the cowboy, 
will soon disappear altogether, for as the ranchers 
come in and take up the land in claims, or buy and 
lease, they keep their cattle on their own ground and 
do their branding in corrals. 

The old-time cowboy is fast becoming a character 
of history. There were only a few men there that 
day who could rope with accuracy. These were a few 
of the old-timers, not all of them old men, either. 

* * * 

A PLEA FOR THE SCHOOL BOARDS. 



BY MAUD HAWKINS. 



A GREAT cry is frequently heard from teachers, that 
they cannot do efficient work in the schoolroom be- 
cause they have no apparatus ; or the query is. How 
can we induce school boards to become sufficiently 
interested in the schools, that they may provide tools 
with which to do the work required. 

My experience has been that they are always ready 
and willing to buy everything and anything, if they 
can be made to understand or believe that they will 
be a benefit to the school, or that they will be used 
and cared for when procured. 

But their generosity has so many times been im- 
posed upon, that they are often at a loss to know what 
really is a benefit. 

A teacher recently entered a school for the first time. 
She had received numerous reports from former teach- 
ers, that the board in this town was very reluctant to 
furnish the necessary appliances for the school. At 
the first glance of the rooms, she received the impres- 



sion that the school was very much neglected by those 
in charge of it, as it affpeared to be very barren of 
appliances. There were two or three curtains hanging 
at the windows, partly torn from the rollers. To be 
sure there were good walls and ceiling and an ample 
supply of bookcases, which, on further investigation 
were found to be packed with text books, and the doors 
were bulging out on account of the promiscuous way 
in which the books had been stowed away. 

On those shelves were found two large maps 
rolled up and stored away, somewhat torn from fre- 
quent shifting, not by use. A good globe was dug 
out of a collection of debris, among which were two 
lengths of stove-pipe, some broken stove grates, win- 
dow glass, broken slates, and seven window shades 
in various degrees of preservation, many of them 
good except being torn from their rollers, which a 
few minutes' work made presentable enough to be 
hung at the windows. 

When the globe was set upon the desk, more than 
one-half of the pupils inquired what it was. The 
others merely knew that it was a globe, further than 
that they had no idea of its usefulness. An excellent 
chart was rolled up and laid on the top shelf ; although 
it had been there several years, none of the children 
had ever seen it before. It brought forth numerous 
questions by the pupils, as to what it was for, and the 
different pictures and exercises on it were the theme of 
conversation for many days. There was always a 
bevy of children around it during each rest period, 
for many weeks ; this alone was the means of them 
gaining much information, without any effort on the 
part of the teacher whatever. 

She also found many queer looking little blocks, 
triangles, squares and prisms of highly polished hard 
wood, lying around in different corners of book 
shelves, closets, desks, etc. Thinking that they might 
possibly be of some use to her in her class work, she 
collected them ; and when all together, she found them 
to be an excellent set of blocks for illustrating the 
subjects of mensuration and geometry. 

In another place was a neat little case which was 
designed as a receptacle for these blocks when not in 
use. And on the wall was a case containing all the 
maps of the world; but these were as fresh as when 
put there, showing plainly that they had never been 
used. There was what once had been an expensive 
dictionary, but the pupils had evidently used it for 
a drawing tablet, as it was covered with all kinds 
of hieroglyphics. There was a Bible with both covers 
torn off, which was repaired with very little trouble; 
a few books of reference to which the children never 
had access. Indeed they did not know they were 
there, having never had their attention called to this 
fact. There was also a large bell on the desk, wash- 
basin, towels, comb, soap, mirror, wastebasket, three 



io8 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



chairs, a good stove, a floor sprinkler and a large flag, 
somewhat in need of repair, a report book with the 
covers partly torn off. 

And still these very teachers had been complain- 
ing of a lack of apparatus. If they could find no 
use for what they already had, v^fould they have seen 
the use for more elaborate appliances, had they been 
furnished them? 

Teachers, if you can do no more, leave those things 
out v/hei'e the pupils may have the pleasure- of knowing 
that they are there and the privilege of looking at 
them, if yoii do not give any instruction with them, 
and above all take good care of them ! 

Toivanda, Pa. 

* ♦ ♦ 

TARDINESS IN SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



BY WALTER TROUP. 



If the superintendent is tardy does not that more or 
less detract from the interest and progress of the cause 
of Christ in this the nursery of the church of God ? I 
say it does ! 

Tardiness causes much disturbance. In all voca- 
tions of life we find this true, but more especially do 
we emphasize it in the Sunday-school work because 
this is God's work. We all know what a confusion it 
causes in Sunday school when three or four are late 
and all come in at the same time. It is a bad 
habit for either the old or young to form, and 
no one receives credit for sowing such seed. 
For instance, some of our people, members, do 
not have so very much to do in the way of the 
cares of this life, and yet often they do not get 
around in time for Sunday school. It should be re- 
membered that older people are looked upon as guides, 
examples, and that they are to some extent moulding 
the lives of the young. When they come late to Sun- 
day school, it is natural for the young to become dila- 
tory and unconcerned and oftentimes we hear them say, 
" Well, there is Brother A. and Sister B., they have 
nothing much to do, and yet they come late, I don't 
see why, with all my duties I should make such an ef- 
fort to be. on time ; I guess I'll not try so hard every 
time, as it will not make much difiference if I am not 
prompt." 

What do such people miss by being tardy ? First of 
all they miss the song service, then the devotional ex- 
ercises, and in many cases the best part of the lesson. 
There is an old saying, " Better late than never," but 
the Christian should apply it " Better never late." 

As a rule when a pupil is late, or tardy, at day school 
the same is recerded by a " black mark," and I am 
afraid if this same rule were applied in our Sunday- 
school work it would count up pretty fast. 

I know of an instance, not more than ten miles from 



home, where tardiness v/as the means of killing a Sun- 
day school ; no one was there on time to begin the work 
rnd of course tlje school died. Who. was to blame? 
The members, of course, of that church were to 
blame. Did you ever ask anyone why they were not 
at Sunday school? and do you remember what kind of 
excuses were given? "I didn't get up in time, some 
one came and hindered me in my work, I was lopking 
for company, it looked as though it would rain, or I 
'.vent visiting, etc., etc.," none of which will bear out 
anyone in that great day of judgment, when in the 
presence of the Almighty God. 

Tardiness causes a cold and indifferent feeling to- 
wards the work. If we yield to this habit once it is no 
difficult matter to do the same thing again, uncon- 
sciously hardening our conscience. Who is to blame? 
Only the person who has committed the crime. May 
God help us all to be more prompt to the work he has 
left us to do. 

Maxwell, Iowa. 

4> ♦ ♦ 
A BUTCHER BLOCK FACTORY. 



BY D. Z. ANGLE. 



One of these factories is situated in Wayne City, 
Illinois. 

The building in which the work is done is about 
forty feet wide by sixty-five feet long, and made 
similar to a barn with a driveway running lengthwise 
twelve feet wide. 

On each side of this driveway are elevated platforms 
of plank two feet from the ground. 

There is also an office and tool room in the build- 
ing. 

The structure is not very high (about ten feet at 
eaves), as space is not needed above. 

Three men do all the work of the establishment. 

They buy logs (mostly sycamore), from two and 
one-half feet on up as thick as obtainable in that lo- 
cality. We saw one log four feet eleven inches in 
diameter at the largest end. 

From these logs the men cut blocks about eighteen 
inches thick with a common crosscut saw. 

The block is then rolled through the building to the 
dressing machine, which is run by an upright engine 
of six or eight horse power. 

Here a man plugs up with wedges all small holes 
or crevices in the block, finds its center and it is then 
placed on the machine where the engine turns it slowly 
around and another man carves it by holding against 
its surface several different tools, till the proper shape 
is obtained. 

When that is done the block is rolled on to one of 
the platforms, is taken charge of by another workman 
who dresses it some, and bores three holes in it where 
the legs are intended to be. 



ILIK liNGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



109 



Tho auger which does this boring is run by the 
engine, l)ut is easily controlled by the operator. 

The block is now painted red, three legs are cut the 
proper k'ngth and turned to the right size, and it is 
ready for sale. 

These blocks are sold and shipped to butchers in 
many States, at good prices, some of them bringing as 
high as twenty dollars. For a butcher block is a neces- 
sary article in every good meat shop, .and you know 
timber is not very plenlifid in some states of our great 
L^nion. 

.1//. I'cnioii. f'l. 

♦ * ♦ 

THE HINDU HOLY LAND. 



A SIGHT of this mighty engineering feat should be 
enough to stop the mouth of any of those cantankerous 
spirits who doubt the benefits conferred on India bv 
British rule. A little above Rurki a massive aqueduct 
carries the whole volume of the canal high above a 
river flowing beneath, and yet higher up two river 
beds are conducted over the canal which passes be- 
neath them. The uniqueness of this piece of engineer- 
ing is dependent on two other factors, the crystalline 
limpidity of the blue water, and the glorious scenery 
which forms a setting to all. I no longer needed to 
enquire wh}' the common consent of countless genera- 
tions had made this neighborhood their Holy Land, the 
appropriateness of it all flashed on my mind the mo- 
ment the glorious vista opened to me. There beyond 
me were the majestic Himalayas, the higher ranges 
clothed in the purest dazzling white, emblem of the 
Great Eternal Purity, looking down impassive on all 
the vicissitudes of pitny man, enacting his drama of 
hfe with a selfish meanness so sordid in contrast to that 
spotless purity ; and yet not unmoved, for is there not 
a stream of life-giving water ever issuing from those 
silent solitudes without which the very springs of man's 
existence would dry up and wither at their primordium 
just as the Eternal Spirit is the fountain light of all 
our day, the postulate of our very existence. And then 
in the nearer distance the lower ranges clothed in the 
richest verdure of the primeval forest, vast tracts not 
yet subdued by the plough of man where religious de- 
votees can strive to rise from Nature to Nature's God 
amid those solitudes and recesses where no handiwork of 
man distracts the soul from the contemplation of the il- 
limitable and mysterious First Cause. Wliile looking 
down from the elevation of the canal there spread out 
at our feet a bucolic scene of peace and plenty where 
villages and hamlets surrounded by green fields and 
cultivation lay scattered among sylvan glades, drink- 
ing in vivifying streams which had journeyed down by 
chasm and defile through valley and through meadow 
from those distant solitudes. How natural it seemed 
that in those early Vedic ages, when the reverence for 



the forces of nature was still unsullied by the man 
worship engendered by the development of his inven- 
tive genius, this vast cathedral of God's own architcc- 
lurc should have been made the chosen place of wor- 
ship of the race where the more devout spirits strove 
not only to worship and adore, but to shake off the 
trammels of a mere mundane corporeal existence till 
the spirit was as free as the birds in the air, as clean 
from earthly dross as the limpid waters below, and as 
integral a part of the great eternal whole as nature 
around, so diverse in its manifestations, yet knitted 
together in one congruous whole by a pervading and 
uniform natural law. But. facile descensus Averni! 
how often the most glorious inspirations are dragged 
down and down till they subserve the basest instincts 
(if man. So here a. little further .on at Hardwar we 
were to have the spiritual elation engendered by the 
natural scene cruelly shattered by a sight of the vile- 
ness and sordidity of the most repulsive aspects of 
humanity, and by realizing how the most divine con- 
ceptions can be dragged and abased to pander to all 
that is brutal and evil in man. — By T. L. PeiuieU, 
M. D. 

<♦ * ♦ 

A BIRTHDAY GIFT FROM THE BIBLE SO- 
CIETY TO THE EMPRESS OF CHINA. 



As the greatest work of the American Bible Society 
has been done in China, it seems fitting that the most 
remarkable copy of the Bible the Society has yet pro- 
duced should be in that tongue. I refer to the sump- 
tuous edition de luxe presented to the Dowager Em- 
press of China on her sixtieth birthday by the British 
and American Ministers, on behalf of the Christian 
women of that country. 

The book was manufactured by the Presbyterian 
Press in conjunction with the silversmiths of Canton, 
and had silver covers embossed with bamboo and bird 
designs. It was printed on the very finest paper ob- 
tainable with the biggest type, and a border of gold en- 
circled every page. It was incased in a casket of solid 
silver, the whole weighing ten and a half pounds, and 
there was a gold inscription-plate on the cover of the 
casket. 

No sooner was this superb volume presented to the 
Dowager Empress than she sent her eunuchs from the 
palace to the book-store of the Bible Society to ask 
for a common copy, so that she and her ladies might 
compare the two texts. Her Majesty evidently thought 
the Christians had one version for the palace and an- 
other for the hovel ! — "Sewing the Bible." Every- 
body's Magazine for January. 

* * 4* 

If you would lift me you must be on higher ground. 
— Emerson. 



no 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



THE JNQLENOOK 

A Weekly Magazine 

PUBLISHED BY 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription price, $1.00 per Annum, in Advance. 

E. M. Cobl), Editor. 

The Inglenook contains twenty-four pages weekly, devoted 
to the intellectual, moral and spiritual interests of the young. 
Each department is especially designed to fill its particular 
sphere in the home. 

Contributions are solicited. Articles submitted are adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine. A strong effort will 
be made to develop the latent talent of the constituency. 

Sample copies will be furnished upon application. Agents 
are wanted everywhere, and will be awarded a liberal com- 
mission. Change of address can only be made when the old 
address, as well as the new, is given. Club rates for Sunday 
schools and other religious organizations. Address as above. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 
OUR YOUNG PEOPLE. 



In the accompanying photograph you have one of 
more than eight thousand who read the Inglenook. 
Some one kindly sent us this photograph, but did not 
tell us who this Nooker is. And while it would prob- 
ably be a comfort to some of us to know, yet the more 
important thing is to know that he is doing the right 
thing. As we look at the photograph it makes the 
editor think that when he is talking to eight thousand 
of this sort, he must remember that they are weighing 
every word and every sentence very carefully. The 
statement has been emphasized that 

A Dollar 

is the most productive thing in the world. Now some 
people may believe that doctrine but we do not, be- 
cause we can't think of the dollar being greater than 
all things visible or invisible, immeasurable in quantity 
of result, infinite in accomplishment. 

In the omnipotence of a dollar there is a fatal de- 
fect. It is material, and, being so, is subject to the 
physical law of action and reaction. A dollar may 
make a fortune to-day and lose one to-morrow ; it may 
make happiness for one man and misery for another. 
The most productive thing in the world is not a dol- 
lar, nor a hundred dollars, nor 

A Million Dollars; 

but it is necessarily something which is not material. 
It is that invisible essence, germ, or spirit, which moves 
vessels and trains of commerce, armies and navies of 
warfare, mows down the forests before the phalanx of 
civilization, makes prairies of the wilderness, and 
builds empires and populates continents ; it is that 
secret power which moulds and fashions the clay of the 
earth into temples, palaces and edifices; that erects 
monstrous structures from the marble and granite 
taken from the rock-ribbed hills ; that elevates our sup- 
ply of fuel from the bowels of the earth ; that snatches 
our illumination from the sky; that makes the earth 



twinkle and sparkle with glorious enterprise, achieve- 
ment and splendor. 

This illimitable force, immeasurable energy and un- 
fathomable prestige, God Almighty has seen proper 
to place in care of 

Our Young People. 
The vast agricultural, manufacturing and financial 
interests of the world to-day depend not upon the de- 
velopment of a dollar ; it is what it is ; but these in- 
terests depend upon the development of our young 
people. The undertakings and the development of 
every important question, whether it be civic, state 
or national, await the sentence of the rising generation. 

It follows, then, that the greatest work of the nation, 
of the pulpit, of the lecture platform, of the school- 
room, of the home, is the proper care, instruction 
and training of the coming man and the coming wom- 
an. Perhaps the first step, or rather an outline for 
all the steps in the process of development, is to aim 
at a harmonious symmetry in the physical, intellectual 
and spiritual culture of the youth. We may well thank 
heaven for the free government, the English language, 
the cosmopolitan character of our nation, the natural 
resources of our country, the diversity of climate, and 
the manifold avocations, amid which, we have op- 
portunity to rear our offsprings. 

In the training of this 

Image of God 

we must use great care and be exceedingly watchful 
that we do not warp individual power and character. 
The child's physical development should be vigorous 
and strong in order that the; intellectual and the spir- 
itual may be well taken care of. The child should 
be taught in infancy to have an insatiable love for 
nature as a wholesome and refreshing tonic educator 
for future work. The country boy or girl has decidedly 
the advantage of those who live in the cities. In a 
peculiar degree these country children are taught, by 
necessity, to utilize the resources at their command. 
They are also in a great degree exempt from the noise, 
dust, glare, confusion, vice, and temptation of the 
crowded cities. On the other hand their companions, 
from birth are the unadulterated sunshine, which is 
never darkened with the black clouds of smoke; the 
blue canopy above, which is not hidden from view by 
the sky-scraper ; the music of the songsters of the sky, 
which is never drowned by the rattle and din of thou- 
sands of vehicles going hither and thither; the rip- 
pling brooks that make the meadows green, whose 
sweet waters have never been polluted with sewer- 
age and offal ; the myriads of beautiful flowers, which 
have not been circumscribed by filthy alley or narrow 
sidewalk. 

Since it is impossible for all of our children to live 
and be educated in the country, it is evident that some 
must be educated in our great centers of 



rill-: I NGLl'INOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



II I 



Congested Population. 

The American systems of public scliools arc makinti' 
wonderful strides towards success. With our modern 
text-books, illustrating, the fundamental principles 
of education, the youth is very well informed at an 
early age as to what he nia\- expect in the lit- 
erary and philosophical world. But it is evident that 
one of the greatest auxiliaries that could be added 
to the American schools for the young, man is a 
department of manual training, and for the 
young woman, a department of domestic science. 
each of these to be 
well equipped with 
shops and laborato- 
ries. It is all right to 
beautify our lovely 
parks, pave our shady 
streets, decorate our 
well-kept lawns, or 
enrich the beauty of 
our homes ; but cer- 
tainly no grander 
monument, no great- 
er blessing, no nobler 
accomplishment could 
be left to our posteri- 
ty than the establish- 
ment, within the 
reach of our children, 
of a school where the 
opportunity, coupled 
with the necessity, is 
to be found where 
they may acquire a 
useful, working foun- 
dation and educa- 
tion. It is all right 
for a boy to know 
his 

A B C's, 
which are the funda- 
mental principles un- 
derlying his future written language ; it is also all 
right for him to be taught the fundamental principles 
of civic, state and national government, along with 
brick-making, stone-masonry, carpentry, blacksmith- 
ing, pharmacy, dentistry, and numerous other profes- 
sions. A truly educated man is one that knows some- 
thing of e-oerything, a/nd everything of something. 
That is, he should have a general education first in 
all lines of life, and then specialize in some profession 
or handicraft. The average boy finishes high school, 
from sixteen to nineteen years of age, and usually 
with a single equipment for bread-winning and his 
sister without any equipment for bread-making. The- 
ory and practice should go hand in hand. 



Many a case might be referred to where men of 
more than ordinary ability, so far as text-book knowl- 
edge goes, have fallen far below their brothers, who 
possessed a smaller degree of knowledge but a broader 
field of experience. The school would be vastly more 
popular with both parents and pupils, provided the 
education of brain and l)rawn could be equally divided. 
We have before us, as 

The People of the Nation, 

this great problem to solve, along with many others, 
but the Inclknook thinks this is one of the greatest 

importance. We are 




We Don't Know His Name, but He's Doing the Right Thing, 



making history every 
day ; and in so doing 
we must conclude 
that the solution of 
all great problems in- 
volves pain, change, 
peril, deprivations and 
hardships ; and yet in 
the outcome, as al- 
ways has been, the 
world is always better 
for the conflict. Don't 
be a coward. Don't 
back out. Don't 
change your plan. 
" Fight it out on this 
line if it takes all 
summer." Christians 
have sprung up where 
the ground was fer- 
tilized with the blood 
of martyrs. Bridges 
are built upon the 
stones which lie low 
beneath the mud. Re- 
formers often seal 
their message with 
their lifeblood. How 
many of our Ingle- 
nook boys and girls 
will say to themselves and to the world, " I will be 
one that stands for good literature, purity of thought, 
freedom of speech and press, manual training, domes- 
tic science, free American life, and the highest type 
and plane of Christianity " ? This young Nooker is 
only one of the great family who will read this edi- 
torial. Shall we not have some good resolutions 
made? If such an army start out for success, what 
short of success can be the result? Let us educate. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

" Thoxj preparest a table before me in the presence 
of mine enemies," means such a feast as no king ever 
sit down to, unless God led him to it. 



112 



THE INGLENOOK.— Tanuary 31, 1905. 



Cia.rre3nLt lE^a^^pjeziLiriLg-s 



RUSSIAN REVOLUTION. 



No crisis since the time of Peter the Great has con- 
fronted the Russian government like the present one. 
Nicholas and his loyal allies have tried to carry out 
the last will and testament of Peter the Great, but 
have most signally failed. The monarchial demands 
and injustices have been too severe. The populace is 
up in arms. The life of the nation is at stake. Civil 
war is on. '' Liberty or death for the czar," is the 
battle cry. Half a million starving men and women 
are in the desperation of despair. Their demands are 
very reasonable and very conservative and their cries 
are something very pitiful, but the czar ignores it all 
with a shower of lead. Twenty-five thousand troops 
have orders to disperse all congregations of peasantry. 

The common people were reluctant to be disloyal 
to the czar, but necessity has driven them to arms and 
a bloody revolution is in sight. Twenty-five hundred 
have been killed already and thirty-five hundred wound- 
ed, and hostilities have only begun. Fields of carnage 
await the oppressed who dare defy the hand of tyr- 
anny. The czar demonstrates his moral cowardice 
by fleeing to his summer resort, both for safety and 
to shun responsibility. All newspapers have been 
stopped and the foreign ministers are leaving Russia 
as fast as possible. Wealthy people are planning va- 
cations in France. The weather is bitter cold and 
there is a heavy fall of snow. 

4> + * 

The city of Schenectady, N. Y., has been experi- 
encing a revival of unusual fervor ; it is a movement 
on the part of all the Protestant churches, the Y. M. 
C. A. and other semi-religious bodies. Meetings are 
neld in all sorts of places, groups of converts march 
to saloons and other places of evil resort, and thou- 
sands of converts are reported. Might not religious 
bodies elsewhere be inspired with the fact that in 
" union there is strength," and with a purpose in view 
some good will be accomplished. 

* * * 

One of the largest buildings of the Farr and Hailey 
oilcloth company, of Camden, N. J., was destroyed 
by fire a few days ago. Loss, $175,000. 

* * * 

An attempt is being made to drive all United States 
currency out of Canada. Robert Bickerdike, member 
of parliament, of Montreal, who is a prominent rep- 
resentative of the business, proposes to make the cir- 
culation of American silver money, in Canada, a crim- 
inal offense, .^t the coming session of the dominion 



parliament a bill is to be introduced to this effeci. ei- 
ther as a government measure or a private bill. This 
movement also recommends an amendment to the 
Canadian criminal code providing that any one utter- 
ing or offering in payment any copper or silver coin, 
other than Canadian, shall become liable to the pen- 
alty of .double the nominal value thereof. 

♦ * ♦ 

Authorities have located more than $50,000 worth 
of diamonds and jewels owned by Mrs. Chadwick, upon 
which no duty was paid when they were brought to this 
country from Europe. Most of the jewels are being 
held by residents of Cleveland, Ohio. These Mrs. 
Chadwick gave as security for loans which she re- 
ceived to aid her in her downfall. 

* 4> * 

William B. Wait, principal of the New York In- 
stitute, has perfected two new inventions for the blind. 
One is the stereograph, which produces plates for the 
printing of literature for the blind. It does the work 
of six hand compositors and obviates the use of new 
type. The other invention is that of the kleidograph, 
which is a typewriter using the Braille characters, or 
points. 

^ 4^ ^ 

The crossing of an electric light and a telephone 
wire at St. Louis brought about serious results. 
George Betz was instantly killed and two other men 
burned and shocked seriously in using the phone while 
the wires were in this condition. 
^ ^* ^ 

The heart of the city of Chelsea, Mass., including 
the Academy of Music and the Hotel Savoy, was de- 
stroyed by fire Jan. 12. Loss, $200,000. 

♦ * ♦ 

In a monthly meeting of the board of directors of 
the St. Louis Exposition, Jan. 10, a report was read 
showing that the company now has a surplus of $998,- 
000 and that $350,000 is due from wrecking com- 
panies for fair buildings. 

♦ * ♦ 

K. H. Sarasohn, the founder of the first Jewish 
newspaper in the United States, died at his home in 
New York, Jan. 12, aged 70 years. 

♦ "$* ♦ 

Four persons were injured in a collision near Riv- 
erside Junction, N. Y. The passenger locomotive was 
derailed and overturned, diverting the course of the 
onrushing coaches and averted great loss of life. The 
trains were under full headwav. 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



"3 



Two Chicago men, John Kenneth MacKenzie and 
Dr. Robert Coy, were murdered by Indians in north- 
ern Mexico recently. They were on their way to 
inspect a mine, and it is supposed they were ambushed. 
The Indians massacred them and. it is understood, 
their escort of five men. 

* * ♦ 

United States may be compelled to use force 
against President Castro, of Venezuela, in order to 
hold the claims properly due her. 

* * * 

The St. Lawrence University, of Canton, N. Y., 
under the direction of the Universalists, has received 
a liberal gift of $50,000 from Andrew Carnegie, in 
view of the fact that his wife was a member of the 
Universalist church and that they were married by a 

Universalist minister. 

* * ♦ 

Booker T. Washington gave an address before the 
Kansas legislative assembly Jan. 18. Governor Hoch 
entered the House with Washington arm in arm, and 
sat upon the platform during the address. Mr. Wash- 
ington stated that the negro race always had been 
grateful to Kansas for its aid and sympathy. He 
recommended an educational qualification for all vot- 
ers. 

♦ -Jt * 

Count Tolstoi, who is supposed to be upon his 
dying bed, has written a letter to the czar, warning 
him that his tyranny is driving his subjects to dissipa- 
tion and his nation to ruin. 

* ♦ * 

Fifteen children were drowned at Zlafbings, in 
northern Hungary, Jan. 21. They were standing in 
a group upon a large piece of ice which had been cut 
round by their fathers, who were carting it away ; the 
piece gave way and they all disappeared. Desperate 
efforts were made to rescue the children, but without 
success. 

* * * 

In order to make times better, as they seem to 
think, people in some parts of Texas have entered 
into an agreement to burn their share of surplus cot- 
ton. In other parts of the South similar agreements 
have been formed. There is a shortage in the Egypt- 
ian cotton crop, and these people who have such an 
abundance should not be too hasty in the destruction 
of that which may make for them a fortune. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Dr. James B. Angell recently tendered his resigna- 
tion as president of the Ann Arbor University, Mich- 
igan, to take effect Oct. i next. He is seventy-six 
years old and has been the head of this institution 
since 1871. He was impressed with the belief that 



it would be advantageous to the university if a young- 
er man would be called to fill his place. The board 
of regents refused to accept the proposition, feeling 
that no other person, young or old, could take Presi- 
dent Angell's place either in the value of his service 
to the university and to the State, or in the love of 
the people. 

* ♦ * 

It will be of some information to the Inglenook 
family to learn that the oldest ship in the world is 
not running as a ferryboat on one of our New York 
ferries, but is the Italian ship " Anita," registered at 
the port of Genoa. It resembles "Christopher Colum- 
bus' ship, the " Santa Maria.'" and was built in Genoa 
in 1548. She made her last vo}'age .at the end of 
March, 1902, from Naples to Teneriffe, and there she 
rests, to be broken up. The " Anita " is of tremen- 
dously stout build, and has weathered countless storms 
and tornadoes in all parts of the world, but she is the ■ 
slowest ship afloat. 

* ♦ ♦ 

It is estimated that the area of the American coal 
fields at present opened to mining is more than five 
times as great as that of the coal fields of England, 
France, Germany or Belgium, the great coal producing 
countries of Europe. 

, "I" * * 

It was recently discovered that in one room of a 
Connecticut high school there were nineteen girls who 
smoked cigarettes. The people of Connecticut con- 
tinue to regard Chicago as the center of earthly de- 
pravity. ;! 

* 4> * 

Wu Ting Fang, former Chinese minister to the 
United States, is reported to be hiding in England, 
he having incurred the displeasure of the highbinders. 
Perhaps he asked the highbinders some of the ques- 
tions it was his habit to put to Americans who were 
introduced to him when he was in this country. 

* ♦ ♦> 

At Ashland, Wis., a barn was set on fire, and while 
trying to extinguish the flames, four firemen were 
badly injured. Some dynamite had been stored in the 
barn and this exploded, blowing the building to frag- 
ments. Nearly every window in the vicinity was bro- 
ken. 

* ♦ ♦ 

An old chest containing more than $150,000 in Eng- 
lish, German and American gold, was found in a se- 
cret alcove on the last parcel of the old Theodore ;\I. 
Macey estate to be sold in the Bronx. The land is 
owned by James F. Meehan and consequently he is 
the possessor of the gold. It is supposed by some 
that the former owner of the property hoarded this 
money. 



114 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




BEST OF ALL. 



In my youth, I longed to hear 
Trumpet measures breathing clear 

To the theme my heart should read; 
In my youth, I longed to see 
Shades Pierian ope for me — 

Laurel boughs float down my meed! 

In my mid-age, nought I care 
For the trumpet's hollow blare — 

Nesting wrens its throat may stop! 
In my mid-age, I require 
Peace and shelter, household fire, 

Ere their leaves the forest drop! 

In my winter, shall I still 
Seek abroad with fretful will. 

Wanting all that I have not? 
Let me swift that chance forestall. 
Say " What's mine is best of all. 

Else it were not in my lot! " 

— Edith M. Thomas, in Lippincott's. 
•:- ♦ ♦ 
POLITENESS. 



BY MRS. M. M. BOLLINGER. 



No one admires courtesy, good breeding, or polite- 
ness more than I and yet I often think too much stress 
is often laid upon the mere outward tokens of polite- 
ness and that it is not the education or promptings of 
the innate kindness of the heart as it should be; but 
is merely a worded repetition or a habit acquired 
through constant drilling and lacks the love, kindness, 
gratefulness and charity of which it should be the 
manifestation. 

The reason for such a belief is, that there is a 
strange inconsistency or impoliteness noticeable in 
some very polite people, that if looked at in the true 
sense of politeness, would stamp them as either un- 
educated, ill-bred, or willfully blind and lacking good 
common sense of the fitness of things. This applies 
to even some church members or Christians ; they are 
too forgetful of true politeness; for instance, people 
who are very particular about teaching their children 
to say " thank you," " excuse me," or " beg pardon," 
do not set them the proper example, that is, they insist 
upon their children being polite to them and to stran- 
gers, but forget to be just as polite themselves to their 
children; then again, when mealtime has arrived and 
the repast is ready ofttimes the whole family gathers, 
one at a time, and commences eating until finally all 
are at the table, which reminds one of a yard full of 



hungry animals each trying to get there first so that 
one may not get more than his share. They do not 
tarry one for the other or thank their heavenly Father 
for the food, or the privilege of eating it, and yet 
during the course of the meal they are very particular 
to thank each other when a dish is passed. 

I have known parents who did not return thanks to 
be so particular on this matter as to send their children 
away from the table for this failure of being polite. 
What if your heavenly Father would refuse to let you 
obtain food or having once obtained it, to let you eat 
it, what would you think ? Would it be any more un- 
just to you than you were to your child? Parents, 
we should ponder these things well, for how can we 
expect our children to be truly polite or thankful un- 
less we allow them the force of our example and be 
thankful to our Father in heaven? 

Sometimes we mothers are slightly to blame for the 
failure in returning thanks by not having our meals 
punctual and every thing upon the table and insisting 
upon every child having clean hands and faces and be- 
ing at the table when father is ready. If it is, let 
us endeavor to remedy the growing evil by being very 
punctual even if we have to let some other work go. 
If the father is to blame he cannot truly be the head of 
the family because there is no head in a Christian 
sense. 

Then again the children are taught to bow to each 
other as a greeting, say " good morning," or good 
evening as the case may be every time they meet, but 
are they taught to be thus courteous to God? How 
often, parents, do you bow to God, say " good morn- 
ing, or good evening," once a day, once a week, once 
a month, once a year, seldom or never? 

If we commit some slight error of good breeding we 
say " excuse me " or " beg pardon " to our acquain- 
tances. And as we are all weak human creatures sub- 
ject to errors, I dare say the best of us commit many 
mistakes during a single hour or day and yet do we 
stop and say " beg pardon " to our Father in heaven ? - 
Some do, but others never. 

Of course some say there is no God, but it is those 
that do not read their Bible or observe nature, or else 
have become blinded by their own willfulness, for how 
can they account for the indescribable changes occur- 
ring in nature, or the mysteries enveloping almost 
everything, if there is not some all-powerful Supreme 
Being at work. 

So, parents, let us awaken to our duty, and not al- 
low politeness to be a mere routine of cold, unfeeling 
meaningless words, but let it be an overflow of that 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



"5 



unboundless love, kindness, and good feeling direct 
from the heart. 

I pray that all may awaken to a true understanding 
of true politeness and be polite to their Father in 
heaven and teach their children to be so, also. 

Vestaburg, Mich. 

*J* ^ ^* 

JOY IN LITTLE. 



BY WE/\LTHY A. BURKHOLDEE. 



" The world is so full of blessings. 
Life is so sweet: 
And I bend my soul in rapture, 
Low at his feet." 

We often deprive ourselves, of happiness by over- 
looking little things. We want great blessings, and 
are not thankful for the commoner ones which are 
constantly ours to enjoy. Water is one of the com- 
mon blessings of mankind, but since the great drouth 
is prevailing people only fully realize the blessing it 
was to them. There are joys in our everyday life, 
but we think they are too little, and grasp after wealth, 
fame, learning, — in our estimation of greater value. 
We forget that the very air we breathe, the warm sun- 
shine and the gentle showers, are all rich blessings 
and should call forth thankfulness. We pass along 
the dusty highway and notice a tiny wild flower, but 
it is only common blossom, and we pass on without 
stopping to examine how beautifully it is formed. Thus 
we fail to enjoy the beauty theie is in the world by 
looking for something greater and not appreciating 
what is strewn in our pathway. 

We should learn to love and seek out these little 
joys and then we can more fully enjoy greater bless- 
ings. We have been endowed with minds that are 
capable of enjoying the handiwork of God that is al- 
ways before us, and if we pass along heedlessly we be- 
come dwarfed and miss rnuch that is calculated to 
awaken real joy in the heart. 

No matter how lowly and obscure the situation in 
life, the common blessings of heaven are strewn in 
the pathway. Everything in nature is instructive to 
the reflective mind, and from even the gentler dew, 
which performs its mission so quietly and impercep- 
tively, we can learn a grand lesson. The snowflakes 
fall noiselessly and are mingled with the dust of the 
earth, and yet who can fail to see beauty in them 
as they descend in their purity? After a drouth how 
refreshing is a gentle shower and yei: we often fail 
to appreciate it, and so with all the blessings that are 
daily showered upon us. 

Life is what we make it, and were we to pay more 
attention to the little duties and joys, and try in every 
way possible to extract the happiness from all that 
is pure and good there would be more " singing hearts," 
— ^^those who go through life scattering beams of sun- 



shine are reflecting the genial rays of their own pure 
lives upon all around them. Then 

" Let us gather up the sunbeams 

That are lying round our path, 
Let us keep the wheat and roses, 

Casting out the thorns and chaflf. 
Let us find our sweetest comfort 

In the blessings of to-day: 
With a patient hand removing 

All the briars from the way." 



Newburg, Pa. 



*i* *2* ^^ 



NEGLECTED CHILDREN. 



What bothers me is the maternal carelessness or in- 
difference that results in helpless children lying around 
loose every day of the year. Ask any policeman, any 
elevated guard, any park employee, and he will tell 
you that the number of children of tender years left 
around in this way is astonishing. To a considerable 
extent, not taken into account by the public, mothers 
are responsible for the extraordinary fatalities from 
street cars, trucks, etc. No motorman or driver is mor- 
ally responsible for driving over accidentally and kill- 
ing a child 2 to 5 years old. The mother of the child 
is responsible. Whenever I read in the daily prints of 
a toddling infant being crushed to death beneath the 
wheels of a street car, I do not think of the motorman 
or driver, but of the agony of remorse that must pur- 
sue the mother of the victim. 

The maternal indifference which permits mere in- 
fants to play unprotected in the open streets is akin to 
infanticide. Yet We see this every day in the city. 
Almost every day children are forgotten in the cars and 
carried to the end of the route or put off at some sta- 
tion to be turned over to the police. The lost child is 
a common sight in the shopping districts. Small chil- 
dren unattended by elders get bewildered in the park 
and are found by the attendants of the city. For- 
tunately the city humanely takes the place of parents 
for the time being and usually manages to restore the 
frightened fledgelings to the home nest. — Pittsburg 
Dispatch. 

•* * 4* 

Break, break, break, 

On thy cold gray stones, O sea! 

— Tennyson. 

♦ ♦ * 

Where liberty dwells there is my country. — Benj. 
Franklin. 

* 4» ♦ 

The post of honor is the private station. — Thomas 
Jefferson. 

• ♦ * ♦ 

The Union must and shall be preserved. — Andrew 
Jackson. 



n6 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



»>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»»»»»»»**»»»*»»»»*****»»»»»»»t» ♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

t 

Reading Circle and Christian Workers' Topics ij 



By EIiIZABETH D. BOSENBEBGEB 

•»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t*»»*»»» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦ 



THE NEED OF CONFESSION.— Rom. 10:9, 10. 



For Sunday Evening, February 12. 

I. The Hardened Sinner. 

Pharaoh— I Have Sinned, Ex. 9: 27 

II. The Insincere Man. 

Saul— I Have Sinned, 1 Sam. 15 : 24 

III. The Doubtful Penitent. 

Achan— I Have Sinned, Josh. 7: 20, 25 

IV. The Repentance of Despair. 

Judas— I Have Sinned, Matt. 27:4 

V. The Blessed Confession. 

The Prodigal, Luke 15:18 

Text. — For if thou shalt confess with thy mouth, the 
Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath 
raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. Romans 
10:9, 10. 

References.— Mark 5:20; Luke 12:8, 9; 1 Cor. 1:5, 6; 
Rev. 12: 11; Psa. 35:28; Psa. 66: 16; John 12:42, 43; 1 John 
1:6; 1 John 4:15; Matt. 10:32, 33; Acts 8:35-37. 

Confessing Christ. 

Why should we confess Christ? Is it not enough to 
believe on him, and reverence him? I am afraid that 
won't do ; he says somewhere that if we do not confess 
him before men he will not own us to the Father, but 
if we confess him before men, he will gladly tell the 
Father that we are his children. Christ was one day 
going out of the city, when a young man came run- 
ning to him with the question, " Good Master, what 
shall I do to inherit eternal life ? " Then Jesus made 
him a great offer. What did he offer him? This 
first. A strange thing, too ! He offered' him a cross. 
I wonder why? Did you ever think of it, boys and 
girls, why it is that the cross comes first ? 

Once, when another young man came to him, earnest 
and zealous, and said, " Lord, I will follow thee 
whithersoever thou goest," Jesus said, I am a home- 
less man, I am sleeping on the mountain side, where 
the wild things find shelter. He told him at once of 
the poverty and discomfort which were his lot. Why 
does the cross come first? Tissot has made it all 
clear for me in one of his wonderful pictures, the one 
that shows the pilgrimage of Jesus through the land. 
On this side there come to meet him the poor blind 
people, the lame, the sick and deformed; but when 
they get past him they are all strong, straight-limbed 
and glad. There is your answer. The cross first ; fol- 
low me. You cannot live for yourself in this world of 
sinful, sorrowing, broken-hearted people. Come con- 
fess me before men, I will bring you where there is 
•work to do ; follow me to where men are struggling up 



under the burden of sin and temptation, help them. 
Lose sight of self, follow me. 

An only child, about sixteen, was sent away to 
school. The first night at the tea table the Christian 
landlady requested him to ask a blessing. There were 
a number of older boys at the table but they were not 
Christians. He blushed, for he was a timid boy, but 
he bowed his head and reverently prayed though his 
voice trembled. That night he could not sleep for 
thinking of how all the term, he would have to ask 
the blessing, and how one young skeptic was likely to 
sneer at him. But he said to himself, " It wouldn't be 
manly to refuse. A Christian who won't stand by his 
colors isn't half a Christian." And so he did perform 
this service all through the year. About the middle 
of the term the sceptic was baptized. He said to this 
boy, " The first night you were here, you were called 
on to give thanks, I could see it was awfully hard for 
you and cost you a struggle. I said to myself a reli- 
gion that would give a shy little fellow like you, pluck 
enough for a thing of that kind was worth having." 
Remember that Jesus wants men who will face the 
thing that is wrong and fight it until it is down. He 
wants men that will love the thing that is good and 
pure and follow it until it is won. What a grand ca- 
reer he gives you. 

Living up to Our Best Intentions. 

" We hope, we aspire, we resolve, we trust, 
When the morning calls to life and light; 
But our hearts grow weary and ere the night 
Our lives are trailing in sordid dust." 

We mean to live well, at least there are times when 
we make resolves to do better ; every New Year's day 
v/e resolve to improve. Some weeks have past in this 
year of 1905, have we kept our resolutions? What are 
our faults? What old mistakes have we avoided? 
Just here is the time and place for some confession. 
You were unkind, but you did not ask your sister's 
forgiveness. You were unjust in talking of your 
neighbor's faults ; indeed you were not quite truthful, 
you colored statements until that ugly word 1-i-e would 
very near fit them. And you know you were wrong. 
But you did not confess to him. Be brave, take up 
your cross and say, " I am sorry." 

David's Confessions of Sin. 

They were many. When David sinned, he prayed, 
" Wash me and I shall be whiter than snow. I ac- 
knovv ledge my trangression and my sin is ever before 
thee. Against thee, thee only have I sinned and done 
this evil in thy sight." And when we pray to God to 



Till': 1.\(;L1-:N00K.— January 31, 1905. 



117 



forgive our sins, the answer comes back, " Thougii they 
be as scarlet they shall be as white as wool." 

Confess Christ in these Meetings. 

Some of you have been afraid to confess him in 
vhes'' irieetings. You have said that you cannot ex- 
press yourself as well as some others. And unless 
you can make a fervent appeal like Brother Smith or 
read as distinctly as Sister Jones, you prefer not to 
make the attempt. By some strange oversight, the 
Lord says nothing about our confessing him eloquent- 
ly. The Pharisee who prayed in the temple had a 
beautiful flow of language, while the poor publican 
spoke only in halting, broken sentences, but Jesus 
listened to the poor publican, and he was justified. 
Your first attempt may not be what you want it to be, 
first efforts seldom are. Try again. Jesus will help 
you, and he will bless your message. 

Topics for Discussion. 

1. Not all who confess him shall see him. Matthew 
7:21-23. 

2. Men do not confess him for fear they may lose 
some position. John 12 : 42, 43. 

3. The Holy Spirit will lead us to confess him. 
I Cor. 12 : 3 ; i John 4: 2. 

4. We are his witnesses. Luke 24 : 48 ; John 1 5 : 27 ; 
Isaiah 43 : 10. 

♦ * 4> 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 



The Missionary Reading Circle at West Milton, 
Ohio, will give the following program on next 
Sunday : 

Devotional Exercises. 

Song. 

The First Bible Missionaries as Examples,. .G. W. Teeter 

Growth of Christian Character, ... .Martha V. Brumbaugh 

Reading, Hettie Pfeifer 

Song. ' 

Denying Ourselves, Charles Flory 

Unseen Influences, Alva Nehr 

Each speaker limited to eight minutes. 

We have copied this programme entire, for the 
benefit of some who are inexperienced, and anxious 
to learn how to form programs. The meetings at 
West Milton are always interesting and we know that 
much good has been done there. When you form a 
program, try to put on a few speakers, who are will- 
ing and able to do their work well. Then put on the 
names of a few others who are unaccustomed to such 
work, and help them to do their part. If you have 
books on missions you can find 'subjects for them that 
will be easy to write on ; at first you should help them 
in every way possible. After while, they can help 
themselves. 

" We have in our community a large body of young 
people, but few of them have accepted Christ. There 



does not' seem to be very much done to interest them 
in the church. We have neither Christian Workers' 
meetings nor a Missionary Reading Circle. Last sum- 
mer an attempt was made to organize a Christian 
Workers' meeting, but it was in vain. Some thought 
we could find nobody to take part, others said that 
it would not be a success, and so the plan was aban- 
doned. Please tell us how we can make our church 
members see the necessity of looking after our young 
people ; they are not interested in missions either. 
Pray for us." — An Humble Worker. 

As we read the above letter we wondered whether 
the " Humble Worker " lives in the only church of 
that kind. We know of some others where the sheep 
are well fed, but the lambs go hungry. Why is it 
that we cannot understand, that the care of our chil- 
dren is all-important ? If you want your church to be 
made up of active wide-awake members whose lives 
are telling for Christ, you must train young people to 
work for Jesus. In the above church, two or three 
members whose hearts are burning within them to do 
some service for Jesus, should go to the officials and 
to the Sunday-school teachers and talk this matter 
over. Get their consent to hold a meeting, then find 
some who are willing to take a part. Form the best 
program you possibly can, invite your church members 
personally to come to this meeting. Work early and 
late to have a good meeting, pray about it earnestly 
and rest assured it will be a success. 

If you want to start a Missionary Reading Circle, 
write to us for circulars, and then distribute them. 
Tell your people that they will enjoy reading some 
books on missions. A missionary sermon should move 
some to see their duty. And by keeping at it, you 
will surely persuade some to join. From the many 
members who belong to our Missionary Circle, we 
have had many words of commendation and apprecia- 
tion for the good done, and the blessings it brought 
to them. Young people who are not appreciated in 
our own church always find a hearty welcome in 
some other church. We cannot afi'ord to disregard 
their welfare. The grass is growing in the little path 
leading, up to more than one church because the chil- 
dren were neglected, and when the older members had 
passed away, there were no young people to take their 
places. The elder and the other ministers should do 
all in their power to help the young people, the future 
existence of the church depends on them. 



Sister Mary E. Shickel, of Broadway, Virginia, 
says, " I have secured eight new names for the Circle. 
I think the books in the course are well selected, and I 
hope to continue the reading, even if I do hold a 
certificate. God is with this movement to bless and 
keep our young people." 



ii8 



THE I NGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



'i| 



OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 



f 



THE GEOGRAPHY CLASS.— Chapter XIII. 



Dublin, Ireland. 
Dear Mr. Maxwell: — 

Near to the south end of the subterranean passage 
where I left you among the rats last week, is the re- 
mains of the well-known Dean Swift, who was the Dean 
of St. Patrick's Cathedral for years, and whose memory 
is still perpetuated by a tablet. 

On the, opposite square we visited the original palace 
of the Dean which is in a remarkably good state of pres- 
ervation, with a modern annex in which lives the present 
Dean, whom we heard read to-day, from the book of 
2 Kings, to a church full of people. 

It was with more than ordinary interest that our party 
visited the capital building, or Castle yards, as they are 
called in Dublin. These buildings date from the thir- 
teenth century, especially the residence of Lord Lieuten- 
ant. Here are also to be found St. Patrick's Hall, Pres- 
ence Chamber, Council Chamber, Chapel Royal, and Bir- 
mingham tower. A large soldiers' barracks is here and 
mounted guards keep their beat continually. In the same 
manner the soldiers watch " The bank of Ireland." We 
were fairly delighted with the history of this building. 
It was formerly the Irish house of Parliament, and the 
old court rooms are still preserved by the strong arm of 
England. A portion of this building is now occupied 
by the bank of Ireland. When King Edward VII as- 
cended the throne of his mother, it was here that he re- 
ceived the resignation of Lord Cordigon, who was the 
royal governor of Ireland, and his successor, Lord Dud- 
ley, took his oath of office. On such occasions about a 
thousand troops pass in state to remind the poor, help- 
less Irish peasant that his hopeless condition is still be- 
ing perpetuated. 

Miss Merritt insists that I do not forget to tell you 
about our visit to Old Dublin, which name is given to the 
hlthy and poorer district of the city. Shortly after we 
left St. Patrick's Cathedral, in passing down a dismal, 
crooked street, we beheld a frightful-looking crowd of 
humanity, as distressed as filth, dirt and poverty can 
picture, assorting old shoes, hats, blankets, garments of 
every description, which they have gathered here and 
there in their canvass during the week, and have selected 
from them such things as their individual families were 
able to utilize, and the remainder of which they had 
brought here to this particular spot to hold what they 
call, " The Sunday morning auction of the poor." These 
auctions occur every Sunday morning; the poor women 
trade, barter and swap until they have accommodated 
each other as much as possible in mating shoes and other 
articles of necessity; and when they come to an end 
with their matching they endeavor to sell the remainder 
for a " tuppens-hapeny," " six pence," or, at most, a 
" shilling." With these pieces of coin they either buy 
from one of their mates a scanty piece of clothing, or buy 
a few loaves of bread to satisfy the hunger of their little 
ones at home. 

By talking with them Roscoe found out that they were 



greatly encouraged by the plans of one Otto Ginnis, 
upon whom the English laws have conferred the title 
of "Sir." Mr. Ginnis has one of the largest, if not the 
largest, breweries in the world. He has grown immensely 
wealthy. He has donated seventy-five or eighty thou- 
sand dollars which is to be used in the construction of a 
large building where these poor people may conduct 
their Sunday morning auctions. These poor Irish fairly 
worship his name, when, if they only knew it, if his old 
brewery was cast into the middle of the sea, they would 
have no use for his donation nor his almshouse. He 
takes all their earnings from them, along with their 
husbands and sons, whom he consigns to drunkards' 
graves, leaves them widows and orphans, and donates 
them a small pittance so they will revere his name and 
that he can hold their trade. 

We pass from this dark picture of misery and woe to 
a beautiful artificial park, called " Stephens Green," which 
was bought and preserved by Lord Ardillann, in order 
that poor children might have a fresh-air exercise at 
their convenience and will. 

The boys at last persuaded us girls to visit the police 
headquarters. At first we thought we didn't want to 
go, but we are glad now that we did. Here we saw many 
young men training for police service; many fine horses 
used by the police department, and many vans and am- 
bulances. One of these ambulances was the identical one 
upon which O'Connel, the liberator of Ireland, was taken 
to prison where he was afterwards beheaded, his head 
being preserved in glass and his body taken to Rome. 

Dublin is full of statuary; some of the statues are of 
Irish noblemen, whom the people loved and almost wor- 
ship, while many of them are statues of kings of Eng- 
land, which are thrust upon them and they submit to 
having them put in their streets, through compulsion. 

A magnificent institution is Trinity College, founded 
by Queen Elizabeth in 1592. Its degrees and fellowships 
are open to every section of the community; its library 
contains a quarter of a million volumes. 

Phoenix Park, which is adjacent, is a beautiful plot of 
ground of eighteen hundred acres in its natural state, 
excepting the beautiful drives and the zoological gardens, 
which are very like our zoological gardens in Cincinnati, 
Lincoln Park, Chicago, or Central Park, New York. It 
was at this place that Lord Cavendish and Mr. Burke 
were murdered on the 6th of May, 1890, and their six 
murderers were executed on the same spot. In the gar- 
dens here are about two hundred lions and several beauti- 
ful droves of deer. As we pass in and out of the park 
we can see the beautiful stock yards with their macadam- 
ized floors, iron fences and a stone wall, made of varie- 
gated stones, encircling the whole yards. They certainly 
put to shame the stock yards of Chicago and many other 
western cities. We had a regular downpour of rain this 
forenoon which, instead of making the yards a miser- 
able slough of mud, only washed them nice and clean. 
We certainly have had a fine time in Dublin. Mr. Cullen 
has certainly been a great friend of ours, and we would 
(Continued on Page 120.) 



1 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



119 



a>v^ 



n 



3 Tfie Q* & (3i^ X^epartment^ t 



\^u^ 



How did the titles of D. D. and LL. D. originate? 

They originated in the twelfth century at the first 
establishment of the universities. The title LL. D. 
was created by Emperor Lothario II at the request 
of his Chancellor, a learned professor of law at the 
University of Bologna, and who was the first recip- 
ient of it. Later the title was borrowed by the faculty 
of theology, and was first conferred by the Univer- 
sity of Paris on Peter Lombard, the celebrated schol- 
astic theologian. The first person to receive the de- 
gree " Doctor of Medicine " was Wm. Gordenio, upon 
whom it was bestowed by the College of Asti in 1320. 

* 

Please give a short sketch of John Davis, who discov- 
ered the Davis Strait. 

His name was John Davis or Davys. He was born 
at Sandridge, Devonshire, England, about 1530 and 
was killed by Japanese pirates in the Strait of Malacca, 
December 27, 1605. He was a navigator and com- 
manded expeditions in search of the Northwestern 
passage, on the first of which, in 1585, he discovered 
Davis Strait. He also discovered the Falkland 
Islands in 1592. 

* 

Can any person apply for a patent, or must he do so 
through a lawyer? What is the cost of a patent? 

Any person can apply" in writing to the Commis- 
sioner of Patents, Washington, D. C, but it might be 
best to consult a lawyer. You must send with the 
application a written description of the invention or 
discovery, with an explanation of how it operates, with 
drawings and a model if possible. The fees are $15.00 
on filing the application and $29.00 on securing the 
patent. 

♦ 

Who wrote The Last Days of Pompeii? 

Edward Bulwer Lytton. It is a history of Roman 
manners, habits and times, concluded with the great 
catastrophe which destroyed the city in 79. 

In No. 47 of the Inglenook I noticed the " Celtic " 
carries both the English and American flag. .Why is this? 

Simply because she sails between English and Amer- 
ican ports, and must of necessity sail under the flags 
of these two nations. 

* 

Is it true that Andrew Carnegie gave $600,000 to Booker 
T. Washington for the Tuskegee Institute in 1903? 

Yes ; he gave that amount in five per cent gold bonds 
of the United States Steel Company. 



Is it true that the frog has two hearts? 

Yes. There are three of them. One to force the 
blood to all parts and two small pumps to keep the 
lymph in motion. 

* 

Who is the editor of the Farmer's Voice? 

A gentleman from Chicago by the name of Burke. 
The Brethren Publishing House only print the paper 
for him and have nothing to do with the owning or 
editing. 

What is the "franking privilege"? 

The franking privilege is granted to all congressmen 
and a few other government officials. It is the right 
to send letters and books through the mails without 
paying postage. 

Is there an old age limit to the Presidential office? 

No, there is no old age limit, but no person is 
eligible to become President who is not at least thirty- 
five years and who has not been fourteen years a resi- 
dent within the United States. 



Who fired the first gun of the rebellion, the Confederates 
or the Unionists? 

The first gun of the Civil War was fired at 4 : 30 
A. M., Friday, April 12, 1861 on James Island, upon 
Fort Sumpter, by a Confederate. 



When did Li Hung Chang die and how old was he? 
Could he speak English? 

He died in Peking, November 7, 1901, at the age 
of seventy-eight years. The Annual Enclyclopedia for 
1901 says that he know no European language. 

* 

In what Judicial Circuit of the United States is West 
Virginia? 

The Fourth Circuit, which includes Maryland, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia. 

How long is the Ohio river, and what is its total drain- 
age area? 

About 1,000 miles, and has two htuidred and ten 
thousand square miles drainage area. 

What is John D. Rockefeller's address? 
Residence, 4 West Fifty-fourth street, New York 
City. Office, 26 Broadway, New York City. 



120- 



THE INGLENOOK.— January 31, 1905. 



-* .♦. 



I! 









THE GEOGRAPHY CLASS.— Chapter XIII. 



(Continued from Page 118.) 
not have seen half what we have had it not been for. him. 
We received our first mail from home yesterday. We 
were very much grieved at the news that Verne Wil- 
liams had his arm broken. Poor Mrs. Williams! It 
seems like she has had so much trouble, anyway, and 
now to think that Verne must be laid up for awhile. It 
makes us all happy to know that the subscription list 
to the " Mayville Times " has increased so much since 
we are sending our letters home. We received a nice 
letter from the editor of the "Inglenook" saying that 
the " Inglenook " family is gradually increasing. Thanks 
to him for the bunch of special " Inglenooks " which 
he sent us. We think that it was a splendid issue. We 
are going to start for Belfast to-morrow. 

Yours respectfully, 

Marie. 
(To be continued.) 

* * * 

How are state flowers chosen, and what are their 
names? 

They are adopted by the pubHc school children in 
most instances, although in some States the legisla- 
tures or women's clubs choose them. They are as fol- 
lows : 

Alabama — Sunflower. 

Arkansas — Apple Blossom. 

California — Golden poppy. 

Colorado — Colorado Columbine. 

Delaware — Peach blossom. 

Idaho — Syringa. 

Indiana — Corn. 

Iowa — Wild rose. 

Kansas — Sunflower. 

Louisiana — Magnolia. 

Maine — Pine cone and tassel. 

Michigan — Apple blossom. 

Minnesota — Moccasin. 

Mississippi — Magnolia. 

Missouri — Golden rod. 

Montana — Bitter root. 

Nebraska — Golden rod. 

New York — Rose. 

North Dakota — Golden rod. 

Oklahoma Territory— Mistletoe. 

Oregon — Oregon grape. 

Rhode Island — Violet. 

Texas — Blue bonnet. 

Utah — Sego lily. 

Vermont — Red clover. 

Washington — Rhododendron. 

West Virginia — Rhododendron maximum. 

Wyoming — Gentian. 



A NEW fuel has been invented by Jacob Smith, 
a glass worker, and it has passed a satisfactory test. 
Speaking of this article, a writer in the Philadelphia 
Record says : " It is said to possess more heat units 
per potmd than either coal or wood; it can be manu- 
factured and sold at a profit for half the cost of coal 
and it does not smoke except when a strong draft is 
used. Its success as a fuel for domestic uses was de- 
termined several weeks ago, but not until this week, 
when it was used beneath an engine boiler, was its 
value for manufacturing demonstrated. The fuel is 
made largely from the refuse of the pulp mills, of 
which there are a number about Muncie. Each mill 
turns out thousands of tons of refuse annually. The 
refuse, a combination of soda and lime, is mixed with 
crude oil, and the finished product resembles putty. 
It may be cut with a spade and thrown into a furnace 
or beneath a boiler. No kindling is necessary, for 
a match touched to it will light readily, the material 
burning with an intense heat. There are no clinkers, 
and the ashes remaining after the fire has burned 
down may be made into a new compound, for which 
Mr. Smith has another use. A bushel basketful of the 
fuel beneath a 6-horse power engine, at a local factory, 
kept steam up for eight hours. It is manufactured 
as a plasterer makes his mortar. The government 
patent office has called it the ' Smith fuel.' " 

♦ ♦ * 

Union, now and forever, one and inseparable. — 

Daniel Webster. 

♦ * * 

The sober second thought is always essential, and 
seldom wrong. — Martin Van Buren. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Me miserable! which way shall I fly 

Infinite wrath and infinite despair? — Milton. 

♦ * * 

He lives ! ftg lives ! a father's curse can never die. — 

Coleridge. 

■*• ♦ ♦ 

Wherever God leads there is victory. — E. P. 

Brown. 

♦ ♦ ♦> 

Whate\-er doing what can we suffer more, what can 
we suffer worse? — Milton. 



Good Land Cheap 



Let us sell you farming land where the soil is pro- 
ductive and the crops dependable ; where we have no 
drouths or failures; where grasshoppers are not; where 
we have few storms and no destructive winds; where 
products are greatly diversified; where the markets are 
as good as they are easily reached; where the climate 
is uniform and salubrious; where you will be cordially 
welcomed and helped along. We state without fear of 
contradiction that we have the best land at the least 
money, possessing more advantages and fewer draw- 
backs, than can be found in this country to-day. A few 
years' time is all that is necessary to prove that we are 
in one of the most productive areas for fruit, root crops 
and live stock. The possibilities are here, largely un- 
developed as yet; all that we want is the people. Those 
we are getting are the right kind, your own kind, and 
the country will soon be dotted with green fields and 
cosy homes. Don't get the idea that you are going to a 
wilderness; not at all; on the contrary, we have sold 
lands in our BRETHREN COLONY to over 120 fam- 
ilies, nearly half of whom are already on the ground, 
In the vicinity of BRETHREN, MICHIGAN, we have 
thousands of acres of productive soil, splendidly adapted for fruit, root and vegetable 
crops and live stock, at prices from $7 per acre upwards, on easy terms. Our lands are 
sold to actual settlers. 




The basis of my business is absolute and 
unvarying integrity. 

SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Founder of the Brethren Colony, Brethren, Mich. 



others coming next spring. 



BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, BRETHREN, MICH., 

is Resident Agent in charge of the work at our Brethren Colony. It will only cost you a 
postal card to drop him a line for our illustrated booklet, entitled " The Brethren Colony 
in the Fruit Belt of Michigan." This will give you an accurate idea of the lands and all 
conditions surrounding them The booklet contains letters giving the opinion of many 
Brethren in regard to our lands and work, ©very statement can be borne out by facts. 

Reduced rates will be furnished homeseekers desiring to look our country over and 
every opportunity will be accorded them to conduct their investigations satisfactorily 
by Bro. Miller on their arrival at Brethren, Michigan. 

For booklet, information as to rates and all details address: 



SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Cadillac, Mich., 

DISTRICT AQENT 



OX" 



Tjetxx<SL 



BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, 
Brethren, Mich., 

RESIDENT AQENT 

.^ssooia.'tloxi.. 



THE ITALIAN GOVERNMENT 

Seeks to Place an Embargo On 

Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer 

THE A/VIERICAN SECRETARY OF STATE 

Secures its Removal. Rev. Martinetti's Shipment Qoes Through Without 

Further Hindrance. 

Owing to the natural prejudice of physicians and druggists in many foreign 
countries, very strict and arbitrary regulations have been enacted covering the im- 
portation of medicine. A short time ago the Italian government, through its officials, 
tried to place an embargo on DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER, the well-known 
and popular herb-remedy. A shipment of Vitalizer to Rev. S. Marticetti, of Rivarole, 
Italy, was detained and delivery refused by the Italian custom officers. A pathetic 
letter was received from Rev. Martinetti by Dr. Fahrney, the manufacturer, telling of 
his great need of the medicine and urging that something be done so he could get it. 

An appeal was accordingly made to the American Secretary of State at Wash- 
ington, with the desired result — the shipment was delivered. 

Department op State, 

Washington, August 15. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: —Referring to previous correspondence, I beg to 

inform you that I am notified by the Charge d 'Affairs ad interim 

at Rome that the shipment of medicine sent by you to the Rev. S. 

Martinetti, of Rivarol, Italy, has been delivered. I am, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

ALVFY A. ADFF, 

Acting Secretary of State. 

DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER can be obtained the world over. 
Knowledge of its health-giving powers has reached to all countries and all climes. 
Every one who has used it spreads the information of its curative powers. Unlike 
other medicines, you cannot get it in drug stores. It is supplied to the people direct 
or through local agents, appointed by the sole proprietor, 

DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 

112=114 ^' Hoyne Ave. CHICAGO, ILL. 



he: tNQL-EINOOK. 



PIANOS, ORGANS AND SEWING MACHINES ON FREE TRIAL!!! 

ELEGANT CENTURY UPRIGHT PIANO, $125. WarrMted 25 years ; Bent on free trid, 
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ELEGANT CENTURY SEWING MACHINES, BALL-BEARING, $13. Warranted 25 years; 
■ent on fieetriaL CASH OR EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS. 




We Irnst 

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the woild. 




Direct from 
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factory 
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WRITE FOR FREE CATALOGUE. 



CENTURY MF'G CO. dep-t 



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East St. Louis, III. 




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ELEGANT CENTURY STEEL RANGES 

With large reservoirs, from $8.00 up. Warranted 
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We trust honest people located in all parts of 
the world. Write for FREE catalogue. 

CENTURY MANUFACTURING CO.. 
Department 325. East St. Louis, III. 




Burlington 




The Big Horn Basin 

is an opportunity 
of to=day 

The man who is wise will investigate it while land 
is cheap and opportunities for investment are numerous. 
He will begin by sending for our descriptive folder 
(twenty-four pages, illustrated), which is mailed free to 
any address, and which gives a reliable, comprehensive 
report of the conditions there, and the prospects of 
future advancement. 



^ 



A postal card request will bring a copy. 

J. FRANCIS, General Passenger Agent, 
209 Adams St., Chicago. 



N609 



i> 



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Now is the time to renew your subscription for the INGLENOOK. If 
you have not already done so, hand your subscription to one of our regular 
appointed agents. If it is not convenient for you to do this send your sub- 
scription direct to us. 



"COLLAR BUTTON" 

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You will bo tlollKhtod. Sunipl".*, 10 conth; 
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WE MAKE PURE, HOME-MADE 

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None better made, Safely sliippcd nnywliere. 
Write to-day for particulars to 



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500 Agents Wanted 

To Sell Books. Good Books; 
Good Commissions. Write at 
once for particulars. Address, 

EBIZTEREN FTTBI^ISHINa HOUSE, 

Elgriu, Illinois. 



FDRNITU^PI 




[g^^a* 





WRITE 
TO ■ DAY 



lor our biff 
free furni- 
ture catalog. 
It represents 
the largest 
and most 
complete assort- 
ment In the ■world of 
riNEMADEFllt. 
MTl'UEforparior, 
dining room, bed 
room, library, hall, veranda, 
kitchen, store, office or any part 
of a house. "We sell furniture in 
single pieces at snine prices deal* 
ers pay for turnltute in wholesale 
quantities. We sell 
Library TablcxntSSaSOtip 

Itookcases nt 4.75 up 

l*reMserB nt 4.95up 

Chiffoniers at 3.80 up 

IronJIcds at 2.05 up 

8idcboard9 at 9,75up 

A^'ood Kockers nt ,75 up 
Parlor Suites. .ot 8.70up 
and every style and kind of re- 
liable furnittire at con-espond- 
, Ingly low prices. From this 

kj catalog you can select any article of fur* 
niture with best judgmcntand greatest 
j eccnomy. WE FURNISH HOMES 
COMPLETE at factory prices with 
furniture, carpels, curtains, 
Btovest tableware, and every- 
thing needed to furnish and 
adorn a home from top to bot- 
tom. Write to-day slating 
goods wanted and we will send 
a catalog of the goods desii^^by 
return mail, free with postage 
paid. Address 

EQUITY- MFG. CO. 

CH I CAGO. I LL 



r 'W. v^iiA«i5ij!i;jSi»< 



''(IRIIRIIIkI 



EARN YOUR SUBSCRIPTION. 



. For only four new subscriptions to the INGLKNOOK at $1.00 each we will 
forward your time on the paper for one year. 

For only five new subscribers at $1.00 each we will forward your time on 
the INGLFNOOK for one year, and send you the FARMERS VOICF for one year. 

How Many Want to Earn their Subscription ? 

YOU WILL FIND IT AN EASY TASK. 

Sample Copies Free. -^m%^ TRY IT ONCE. 

Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, Illinois. 



THE QOSPEL MESSENGER FOR 
MISSIONARY PURPOSES. 

"The General Missionary and Tract Committee have a plan to use the GOSPFL 
MESSFNGFR as a missionary in a very effective way. They propose to help pay for 
10,000 SUBSCRIPTIONS outside the Brethren Church. 

THE PLAN. 

The plan for securing these 10,000 names is to alJow any one not a member of the 
Brethren Church, and not living in a family where there are members, to have 
the Gospel Messenger from now until Jan. 1, 1906, ior only 50 cents. 

Or anyone interested in this plan of doing mission work may donate the paper to those 
not members and not living in families where there are members for only 50 cents 
for the year. 

This 50 cents does not by any means pay the first cost of the paper, but the General 
Missionary Committee have so great faith in the Messenger as a missionary factor that 
they are willing to expend considerable money on making up the deficiency in order to 
have the paper read by those not members of our fraternity. 

Send your order at once and the names will go on our list without delay. Cash must 
accompany each order. Always mention the fact that your order complies with the rules 
governing such subscriptions. Remember it is only 50 cents. 

Address BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois; 



THE FINAL WIND-UP 

of our year's business will be Jan. 31, 1905. We are exceedingly glad to announce ihat mir busines.s has much 
more than doubled this past year and prospects point to an equally large increase the coming year. This growth is 
due to the confidence placed in the Company by our cusloniors and friends and we take this opportunity of ex- 
tending to one and all our sincere thanks. 

Our Working Plans 

(1) We have been successfully refunding freight and expcess charges on goods shipped from our Company for 
one year. No other Mail Order House has ever done this. Full explanation given in new catalog. 

(2) Cooperation has proven a powerful factor in the development of our business. Over 1,000 Christian peo- 
ple have already joined hands in this great enterprise and have contracted for nearly $1,000,000.00 worth of stock. 
Our original plan of "Scientific Cooperation" is protected by the Registry laws of the States and cannot be used 
by others without license. 

The Mail Order Business is something that interests every household and is destined to be the greatest busi- 
ness of the age. The influence and assistance of over 1,000 people cannot be easily overestimated. Are you in- 
terested in the plan? Write for particulars. 

Our New Year Announcements 

(1) The same guarantee goes with each sale in the future as in the past. We only solicit your orders on 
the basis of giving absolute satisfaction. 

(2) Our yearly financial statement will be printed and ready for distribution by the latter part of February. 
Our business is a public corporation in which thousands are interested, therefore, a statement will be mailed to 
anyone on request. _ '- 

(3) A dividend of 10 per cent will be declared out of last year's earnings. 

(4) The policy for the future will be to continue on the same safe lines and use all legitimate means for 
the increase and success of the business. Experience teaches us " Be sure you are right, then, go ahead." 

(5) During the year we will be in need of a number of additional workers. Correspondence solicited from 
Christian men and women proficient in stenography, or willing to learn office work. No person of questionable 
habits need apply. 

(6) Our permanent Business Home is now being planned and we expect to have our location selected in the 
near future. A new, modern and commodious building will be erected so as to meet the demands of the Busi- 
ness. 

(7) The Annual Meeting of Stockholders will be held on the last Tuesday in April. A very enthusiastic and 
interesting meeting is assured. 

(8) Any one wishing to know anything about the business and our plan of cooperation vfiU be given full 
information on request. Correspondence of any nature will be held sacred. We publish no testimonials or names 
of any one without written permission to do so. 

(9) Our No. 64 Catalog will be ready for distribution by the first of March and will contain 872 pages filled 
with attractive and competitive prices. Drop a card for a copy and see for yourself. It's free. 

(10) Albaugh Bros. Dover & Co. is the name of our corporation and we have no connection with any other 
Mail Order House. Our name has never been changed since the Corporation was organized, and we call attention 
to this fact to avoid confusion. Personality in a name instills confidence. The Board of Directors is composed of 
the following persons: H. P. Albaugh, G. S. Albaugh, O. T. Dover, M. R. Myers and Charles E. Eckerle. 

(11) We desire to be of service and earnestly solicit your patronage with the strict understanding that the 
Golden Rule principle shall apply at all times. Give us a trial. 

Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co., 

'FlcLG mail Ox*cl.ex* ^Xo-u-se^, 



341 Franklin St. | ^-tbcat>s the fji.ace" | CHICAGO, ILL- 



Fine lArt Pictures 



■ 


L^^^BJ^" ..•»-•■ 


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IBk^ 


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I^SP^ 


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^ft^^''*- ':^%£^tei 



Here is Your 

Opportunity 

to Get a 

Fine Lot of 

Pictures 

CHEAP 




No. 2079.— The Guardian Angel. 



No. 850. — Simply to Thy Cross I Cling. 



ARE HIGHLY PLEASED. 

These pictures are all colored and are exceedingly fine. 
They would be an ornament to any home. They are very 
."Tuggestive and all who see them are highly pleased. 

THOUSANDS SOLD. 

In the past two or three weeks we have sold more than 
2,000 of them. These pictures sold last year for 25 cents 
each. 

OUR SPECIAL PRICE. 

We have secured a large -number of these pictures and 
are therefore able to give our patrons' a very low price 
on them. 

Size of Pictures, 15 by 20 inches. 

For Orre or more, and less than Six, IS cents each. 

Half-dozen, 75 cents. 

One dozen or more, $1.32 per dozen. 

Order by Number. 

We can furnish you with anj' of the following subjects: 

No. 24 Pharaoh's Horses. 

No. 25 Can't You Talk? 



No. 278 Rock of Ages. 

No. 2079 The Guardian Angel. 

No, 850 Simply to Thy Cross I Cling. 

No. 2366 The Lord's Supper. 

No. 41.... The Lord's Prayer and Ten Commandments. 

No. 43 The Crucifixion. 

No. 45 Soul's Awakening. 

No. 47 Madonna and Child. 

No. 78 Evening. 

No. ■ 27 Defiance. 

No. 52 Theodore Roosevelt. 

No. n Nature's Beauties. 

No. 742 Spring. 

No. 748 Breakfast Time. 

No. 4002 Assorted Fruits. 

No. 750. .'. Flowers and Fruit. 

No. 734. . ■. The Old Mill. 

No. 752 Slimmer in the Far West. 

I FREE.--Our Large Illustrated Circu- % 
I lar of these 20 Subjects Sent Free % 



-^^ X> X> 3FX. X: S J5 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 



ESUiCS-IKT, IXjI_.I3NrOIS. 



^iksl-cksok: 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 



T ^ 



■»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



t 



t 
I 



I- 

I; 



I 
I 



t 



t 



POEM. 

DON'T RUN IN DEBT. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

LIFE AMONG THE EARLY SETTLERS.— By J. G. Figley. 
IMPORTANT ATTRIBUTES IN THE ACQUIREMENT 

OF DISTINCTION.— By Etha A. Evans. 
HOW ANIMALS MINISTER TO OUR COMFORT.— 

By H. M. Barwick. 
THE TEACHERS OUTSIDE OF THE SUNDAY SCHOOL 

CLASS.— By Lottie M. Bollinger. 
OLD BILL.— By Maud Hawkins. 

THE STORY OF AN ARROW-HEAD.— By Emerson Cobb. 
MUSICAL NOTES.— By Marguerite Bixler. 

EDITORIALS. 

A SECOND-CLASS' MAN. 

GREATNESS. 

THE TALENT OF INDIVIDUALITY. 

MUNITIONS OF WAR. 



* ! ' * X * ' ♦* * ^ 



t^t^M^M^t^t^t^i >ti 1*1 1^1 p|i i{>^. ■;« ■;■ i»i ■!■ 1*1 ii, ■{, i|. '{►^^^t^Hi*^ 
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ftf*-*-* ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



February 7, 1905 



$ 1 .00 per Year 



Number 6, Volume VH 



THE rNQLENOOK. 



30,000 ACRES 



IRRIGATED 



Government Land 

In Nevada 

NOW OPEN FOR 

HOMESTEAD 



UNDER THE NEW 

IRRIGATION LAW 

The United States Qovern- 
nent Constructs the Canals, 
Reservoirs and Lateral Ditch- 
es to the Land, and Maintains 
them for lo Years at a cost of 

ONLY $2.50 AN ACRE 



TM* Includo Water. After ■• Years Water 
and Canals Belong to Homesteader. 



ONE-WAY COLONIST'S RATES 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, March 
I to May 15. 

From Chicago $33 co 

From St. Louis, 30 00 

From Missouri River 25 00 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 



Stop Off at Reno, Nevada, 

And investigate the irrigated Govern- 
ment land. Call on Mr. H. B. Maxson, 
U. S. Engineer, for information. 



Printed Hatter FREE. Write to 

GEO. L. McDONAUQH, 

COLONIZATION AGENT 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Omaha, Neb. 



...THE... 

Union Pacific Railroad 

In Connection With 

San Pedro, Les Angeles & Salt 
Lake Railroad 

EXPECT TO BE RUNNING 
THROUGH TRAINS BETWEEN 
CHICAGO AND LOS ANGELES 
VIA SALT LAKE CITY EARLY 
NEXT SPRING. 



ONE-WAY COLONIST'S RATES 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, March 
I to May 15. 

From Chicago, $33 00 

From St. Louis, 30 00 

From Missouri River 25 00 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 

There are opportunities in Southern 
Utah and Nevada where homes can 
be had at little expense, where no 
heavy clothing and but little fuel is 
needed, where garden truck can be 
raised in abundance nearly the whole 
year, and where the people can live 
in tents throughout the year without 
suffering from heat or cold. The new 
line of the Salt Lake Route, now 
building through to California, will 
pass through several well watered 
valleys in these states, in which can 
be grown apples, grain, potatoes, figs, 
cotton, sugar cane, tobacco, peanuts 
and many of the semi-tropical fruits. 
These valleys are surrounded by hills 
and lofty snow-capped rnountains, 
which furnish an inspiring back- 
ground to the scene which greets 
the traveler who finds his way into 
the favored region. The climate is 
mild and delightful, and excessive 
heat and extreme cold is unknown. 
This is a good place for a poor man 
to get a home, the sick to find health 
and the capitalist to make good in- 
vestments. 

If you are interested in mining, 
manufacturing or agriculture, or seek- 
ing a new home in a new land, and 
desire to know more about the great 
resources of Utah, Nevada and Cali- 
fornia, write to Geo. L. McDonaugh, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Neb. 

And then stop off at CALIENTES 
and LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, to in- 
vestigate for yourself. Be sure to buy 
your ticket over 

The Union Pacific Railroad 

known as the "OVERLAND ROUTE," 
and is the only direct line from 
Chicago and the Missouri River to 
all principal points West. Business 
men and others can save many 
hours via this line. 

K L. LOMAX, G. P. ft T. A.. 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



CHEAP RATES 

(To Sterling, Colorado,) 

South 
Platte 
Valley 

AND RETURN 



First and Third Tuesday 
jFebruary and March 

From Chicago, $20.00 

From Peoria, $18.00 

From St. Louis, $15.00 

From Missouri River, $15.00 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 

Where you will see thousands of 
stacks of hay, thousands of fat cattle, 
thousands of fat sheep, thousands of 
acres of irrigated land that can be 
bought at from $25.00 to $45.00 per 
acre. 

Only 24 hours' run to Chicago; otUy 
12 hours' run to the Missouri River; 
only 4 hours' run to Denver. The on* 
ly country that can make a good 
showing to the homeseeker in mid- 
winter. Go and see for yourself — it 
need only take four or five days' time 
and you will be well repaid by what 
you see. Buy your ticket over 

The Union Pacific 
Railroad 

Which is known as "The Over- 
land Route." and is the only direct 
line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West 
Business men and others can save 
many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal to your nearest ticket 
agent, or GEa L, McDONAUQH, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Nebr. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A, 
Omaha, Nebr. 



i 



THE INQLEINOOK. 



■^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦tf»»»»»»»« ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Safe and Convenient 

ir you want a good safe, conservative investment, write tha Peo- 
ples State Bnnic, McPlierson, Kans., about tlioir " First Mortgage 
Bonds." 

Ten Interest Coupons witli eacli Bond. Tlie Interest Is payable 
SemI-Ann\iaUy. All you need do is to clip oft the Coupon and send 
to them, and they will collect and remit to you " Free " ol charge. 

Have had eleven years experience in making First Mortgage Loans 
in McPherson County, Ivans., and have never lost one dollar Interest 
or Principal on any of these loans. 

Customers are well pleased. .; 

References : 

Eld. D. L. Miller, Mt. Morris, 111. 
Eld. J. J. Yoder, McPherson, Kans. 
Galen B. Royer, Elgin, 111. 
J. P. Reiman, Pugh, Pa. 

PEOPLES STATE BANK, 

p. A. Vaniman, President, McPHERSON, KANSAS. 

6t5 
♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



• t > ' 1 ' ' t ' > t> ' t * ' t ' ' t ' ' t ' ' t ' ' t ' ' t ' > t ' < t < > t ' ' t ' < t ' ' t ' ' t ' ' t ' ' t ' ' t ' ' t ' ' t ' ' t > ' l < ' If 

Weak Stomach 
Indigestion 
Dyspepsia 

To any sufferer of the above named 
diseases will be sent a 30 days Treat- 
ment of BRAWNTAWNS (50 cents) 
on the following conditions: Use ac- 
cording to directions, one tablet aft- 
er each meal and one before retiring 
for 30 days, and if you can truthfully 
say you have not received any benefit 
and do not feel any better from the 
use of BRAWNTAWNS, your mon- 
ey will be cheerfully refunded. 

Victor Remedies Company, 

FREDERICK, MD. 

» i t . ■ ! < ■! ■ » » i - » ■ : ■ ■ ! . { ■ ■ : ■ ■ : ■ - i - > t > i> ■ : ■ > t < >t < » » t < » : ■ » t -^^ 

FREE SAMPLE 

t Sendletterorpostal for tree SAMPLE 

HIIDOOTOBAeCO HABIT CURE 

We core yon of chewing and smoking 
for 60c., or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
harmleas. Address Milford Drag Co., Milfon^ 
Indiana. We answer all letters. 

37tl^ Mention the INRI FVnOK *npT «r,Hr,£ 

IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
PLEASE MENTION THE INGLE- 
NOOK. 




Job Printing 



The Kind that Brings Re- 
sults, the Kind you needn't 
be ashamed of, the Kind 
that is Cheapest in the End 
because Just as You Want 
it, — Furnished by 



Brethren Publishing House 

Elgin, Illinois. 



fiOSPEL SONGS and HYMNS 

No. I. 

Has a wonderful sale, and the book 
still LIVES. We are receiving or- 
ders daily for this book and have 
sold more than 40,000 copies since it 
has been published. There is onlv 
one reason for this. It is simply be- 
cause 



THE SONGS AND HYMNS IT 
CONTAINS STILL LIVE. 

This book is used by thousands in 
the Sunday school, young people's 
meeting and general song service. It 
contains 208 pages and sells at 30 
cents each, or four for $1. Send 
your orders to 

BBETHBEir FUBKISHIVO HOUSE, 

Elffln, minote. 




CUT THIS OUT 

Of every Nook for 
six months, send 
us the 26 LION 
HEADS and we 

will send you any 
one of (iiirsixtcen 
"HOME TRE»THENI" 
I'leniedies FREE. 
Send for descriptive list and make your 
selection. Live agents wanted. Profit- 
able business. 

RHEUMATISM CURED 

Our latest and finest remedy for 
Rheumatism, Sciatica, Gout, Stifi and 
Painful Joints, etc., is TONGA Tablets, 
which removes the uric acid from the 
blood and cures Rheumatism perma- 
nently. A trial box only 50 cents. 

VICTOR MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, 



S. F. Samger, Secy. 



SOUTH BEND, IND. 



E. C. WARD. 



HARRY W. JOHNSON. 



HOMES IN SUNNY AND RAINY CALIFORNIA 
WARD & JOHNSON, 

RACKERBY, CAIFORNIA. 

Within Bounds of the Bangor Church. 

2tl3 Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 

The HOME GEM WASHER 

AGENTS can make from 
S600.00 to $1,000.00 in 
one year selling this ma- 
chine. Special introductory 
price where I have no agent. 
Address, Wm. S. Miller, 
Meyersdale, Pa. 

2tl3 Mention the mcLENOOK wtien writing. 



WANTED! 




Local agents to sell first-class 
Fruit Trees, Berries, Roses, etc. 
Liberal terms. 

E. MOHLER, Plattsburg, Mo. 



Our New 



BOOK ANO BIBLE CATALOGUE 

Is Yours for the 
Asking. 



BBETHBBN FUBAISHIITO HOUSE, 

Elgrln, lUlnolB. 



THE JNGL-ENOOK. 




P 



DOUBLE UMPKIN 
DOUBLE I 
DOUBLE UMPKIN 
UMPKIN PIE 



WHY NOT COME TO THE 

LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 

FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 

Where Pumpkins, Corn and common crops grow, as well as every kiitd 
c4 California fruit? 

Come and visit the Brethren who are living here and see what they have 
done in the past two years. 

Nearly 600 sales made since we put this land on the market and over 2,000 
people now living on the grant where there were but about sixty a little orer 
five years ago. 

This does not look like a temporary boom, does it? Must be something 
solid behind all this. If not, five years ought to show up the weakness, bot 
instead of weakening the Laguna and its various interests are growing stronger 
all the time. 

If you are thinking of coming to California to make a home you cannot 
afford to overlook this place. 

We still have plenty of good land with abundant water for irrigation. 
The price is from $30.00 to $60.00 per acre, terms, one-fourth cash, balance 
in eight annual payments. 

COLONISTS' RATES 

will again be in force March 1 to IS, 1905. 

From Chicago to Laton $33.00 

From Mississippi River to Laton $30.00 

From Missouri River to Laton, $25.00 

Make your plans to start for California March 1st and you will be in time 
to buy land and put in a crop. 

Write us for free printed matter and local newspaper. Address 

NARES & SAUNDERS, = Laton, California. 

33113 «eniion the INOUENOOK when wrttmS' 



WE MAKE PURE, HOME-MADE 

Apple Butter 

None better made. Safely shipped anywhere. 
Write to-day for particulars to 



C. J. MILLER & CO., 



Smiihville, Ohio. 



CANCER 

Cared without 
Surgery or 
Pain. 
O n r latest 
book which 
we will send 
free of charge 
tells tllaboui 
Cancer and 
all chronic 
and malig- 
nant >4iseas- 
es , and how 
they can be 
cured at home quickly and at small ex- 
pense, reference, patients cured in every 
State and Territory, ministers & bankers 

iddreit, Sn. Biitliirt & Co., lock Box O, Eckow, hd. 




FREE 

To introduce my great Antiseptic 
Aeriform Medication and to prove be- 
yond doubt that it will cure consump- 
tion, bronchitis, asthma, catarrh and 
weak lungs, I will for a sliort time give 
One Monffi's Treatment Free, including 
Inspirator and all medicines complete, 
exactly as sliown in illustration. 



THE 
COMPIETE" 

CURE 




One Month's Treatment Free, 

Do not delay, but write at once, and tell 
me the nature of your lung, throat or 
head trouble, and how long the disease 
has had a hold on you. The Month's 
Free Course is intended to prove the 
genuine merits of the cure, and costs 
nothing to afflicted ones, who enter 
upon a course of treatment. 

I will keep in close touch with my pa- 
tients during the progress of the treat- 
ment and will make no charge whatever 
for my professional services, consulta- 
tion and all correspondence. J^ddreBS 
Dr. Marshal Beaty, Specialist, 359 West 
Ninth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
PLEASE MENTION THE INaLE- 
NOOK. 



•t-he: imolenook.. 



$^■95 




QC for this large 
■V V handsome 
stool range 

nithoiTr )>i?h closet or reservoir. With 
lni(;e, high, roomy, wirmiDK' closet and 
rc;>ervolT.Jiist OS shown lo cut. SI 1.B0. 
Rttaorvoir Is porcelain oo Inside, (ubestus 
covered on outside. Heavy cast top with 6 
full sii-e cooking holes. Larpe roumy oven, 
regular ft- 18 size. <We h.ive9stylcs ofste*! 
and cast raDgcswlthmucIiIftTRcr and small- 
er oveos, sizes to suit all.) 
Tho body is mnde of cold 
rolled steel, top and all cast- 



$0.95 gaV"* 

fc HoatOP 

)ust as Illustrated, Bums 
hard or soft coal or wood. 
Has drawn center grate,, 
corrueated tiro pot, cold 
rolled sheet steel body, 
heavy cast base, lartre cast 
f eeJ door, ash pit door and 
ash pan, swing top. screw 
draft-rcEiiIator, Polished 
urn, nickel top ring, name 
plate, foot rails, etc. 
We have heating 
es of every kind,' 



Hot hlost. ftlr tijrhts. tho 
kind that ret/>ilsror$3.00» 
for 80o. Base burners 
at J4 tho rcf^ilai price 



OUR TERMS 




Itng^ of best pip Iron. Gfalo} 
i we use Improved duplex (Trate, 
Ibums wood or coal. NIokol 
'band oa front of main top; 
brackets and tea shelves on 
r closet; band andorniiment on reservoir; 

oven door, etc. Are htghly polislicd,J 
1 mnkinR the r ang e an ornament to any home, 

•ra tho moal llbaral^ 
avormado. We wilt ship you 

. anyrangoorstove.ouaranlaek 

it to be perfect In coustructJoa and material and we guarantee It to' 

rench you inperfect condition. You can pay for it after you receive it. Vouoanfakalt 
Into your own homo and use It 30fu}|davs. If you do not tind It to be exactly as represented and perfectly satisfactory 
In every way. and the bi^,'>,'cst bar^jninln a stove you ever saw or heard of and equal to stoves that retail for doublo our prlce» 
you can return it to us and we will pay frcifjtlC both ways. SO you wnn'tbeoutone single cent, 

mTIIIC **An" nilT '^"'Isendittousand wowfll mailyouour freeStoveCatolog. It explains ourterni5funy« 
I niv nV UU I tells you how to order. Don*l buv a stove of any kind until you flcl our new large 
Slovo Celaloguefor 1004 and 1006 and see our 
liberal tcnns and the lowest srlces over made* 

EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY CO., Chicago, III. 






HISTORY OF THE BRETHREN j; „ , 



BRUMBAUGH. 







This book has been sold by the thousands, yet there is 
a demand for same because it gives the most authentic 
history of the Brethren of any yet published. It is pro- 
fusely illustrated and is printed on good paper. Bound 
in cloth, $2.00; half morocco, $2.50; full morocco, $3.00. 

Address : 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 



s sms §3 ss gs gs §s gs gs gsss 



ornia 

Oregon ai^^ 

Washington 

Fast Through Trains Daily 

over the only double -track railway between Chicago and 
the Missouri River. Direct route and excellent train ser 
ice. Two trains a day to 

San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland 

Through service of Pullman compartment, drawing-room and 

tourists sleeping cars, dining cars, library and observation 

cars, buffet smoking cars and free reclining chair cars. 

Daily and Personally Conducted Excursions 4 

For tickets and information apply to agents of 

The North=Western Line 

or address 

W. B. KNISKERN 

Passenrer Traffic Manager 

CHICAGO 



m 






THE 

REEDLEY 
TRACT 



Tlie Gem of tlie San 
Joaquin Valley 

Embraces tlie Mount Campbell, 
Columbia, Carmelita, Springfield, 
Producers, Level Orchard, Kings 
River and other Colonies. These 
are among the best lands in the 
State for all kinds of fruit and 
alfalfa. Good soil, low prices, 
abundant water, healthful climate, 
perfect natural drainage. 

Special inducements made to 
Brethren. Colony now {orming. 
Write for booklet, and full infoim*- 
tion. Address, 

O. D. LYON, 

Reedley, Fresno Co., California. 




Via Dubuque, Waterloo and Albert Lea. 
Fast Vestibule Night train with through 
Sleeping Car, Buffet-Library Car and Free 
Reclining Chair Car. Dining Car Service 
en route. Tickets of agents of I. C. R. R. 
and connecting lines. 

I A. H. HANSON, G. P. A., CHICAOO. 



IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
PLEASE MENTION THE INGLE- 
NOOK. 



i/\i/ilif\li 



^ 
^ 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



¥1^ A 1-^/^ is the best-watered arid State in America. Brethren are moving there because hot 
lUx\.M. m.\J winds, destructive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- 
mate it makes life bright and worth living. 
We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a 
change for the general improvement in your condition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on 
account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise 
and sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions to an- 
swer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad 
fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see 
for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. 



100,000 Acres Now Open for Settlement at 
Twin Falls, Idaho, under the Carey Act. 

Unlimited supply of water for irrigation and for power. A grand opportunity for the Home- 
seeker who locates on these lands. 10 years time given for payment for land and water after lands 
are sold. The canals and water belong to the settlers who will own and control the same. 



1| Homeseekers' Roand=Trip Excursion Tickets 

!^ will be sold to points in Idaho on the first and third Tuesday of February, March and April, 1905. 

.^ The rate will apply from Missouri river points and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloomington, Peoria and 

•^ St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific from stations on their line 

^ in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip, plus $2.00, with 

r§ limit of IS days going. Return passage may commence any day within final limit of 21 days from 

:A date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting point. 

■$ COLONISTS' ONE WAY SECOND CLASS tickets will be sold to above points from March 

fS first to May 15th inclusive. 

If Alfalfa, Fruits, and Veg^etables, Grow in Abundance. Fine 
jS Grazing: Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 



'.^ Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 

[^ Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 

•^ to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 

9 or March the yield would have been much larger. 

:^ Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 

•^ oats. 

■^ Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 

19 the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 

•<* 

■^ D. E. BURLEY, 

'^ S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

J. K HOOPE^R, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. Salt Lake City. Utah. 

Mention the INOLENOOK when wriHB«. 40tl3 



mlKSLt-KnOK 



Vol. VII. 



• February 7, 1905. 



No. 6. 



DON'T RUN IN DEBT. 



SELECTED T.Y LOTTIE noLLINGER 



Don't run in debt; never mind, never mind, 

If your clothes are all faded and torn; 
Fix them up, make them do; 'tis better by far. 

Than to have your heart weary and worn. 
Who'll love you the more for the set of your hat, 

The rouge, or the tie of your shoe, 
The style of your vest, your boots, or cravat, 

If they know you're in debt for the new? 
Tlicre's no comfort, I tell you, in walking the streets 

In fine clothes if you know you're in debt; 
And fear that perchance you some tradesman will meet 

Who'll sneer, "They're not paid for yet"! 

Kind friends, let me beg of you, don't run in debt; 

If the chairs and the sofa are old; 
They'll fit your backs better than any new set, 

Unless they are paid for, and with gold. 
If the house be too small, draw the closer together, 

Keep it warm with a hearty good will; 
A big one, unpaid for, in all kinds of weather 

Will send to your warm hearts a chill. 
Kind husbands, don't run in debt any more 

'Twill fill your wife's cup with sorrow. 
To know that a neighbor may call at your door 

With a bill you must settle to-morrow. 

Oh, take my advice, it is good, it is true; 

But lest some of you doubt it 
I'll whisper a secret, now seeing 'tis you; 

I've tried it and know all about it. 
The chain of the debtor is heavy and cold. 

Its links all corrosion with rust; 
Gild it o'er as you will, 'tis never of gold 

Then spurn it aside with disgust. 

. — Author Unknown. 
♦ ♦ 4> 

SNAPSHOTS. 



Invest money, don't merely spend it. 

/;; battles zvith the devil everything depends on ivho 
strikes the first lick. 



The sermon that most pleases you may not be the 
one that most helps yoit. 



Sin is the most e.vpensivc thing on earth. 

It zvill pay better to go liungry than to feast by 
means of a dishonest dollajr. 

.* 
The biggest coward you can find anywhere is the 
man zvho is afraid to do right. 

♦ 

There seem to be more lies told for politeness' sake 
than truth for conscience' sake. 

Don't smoke a poor cigar, but remember that good 
ones have not yet been invented. 

* 

The criminal can hide from- the officer zvho is on his 
track, but no sinner can hide from God. 

* 

If some people zvould read their Bibles more they 
wouldn't be so an.vious to make money. 

Postpone your prayers for the poor %mtil you, have 
done something to relieve their necessities. 

<» 
When yoit, begin to grozv cold in religion, open your 
Bible and go to mm-king its precious promises. 

* 
You can generally tell about Irozv much religion 
a man has by the kind of company he keeps. 



Every sin has an avenger on the track of the man 
zvho commits it, and if not confessed or forsaken it 
will kill him-. 

* 

A jnan never needs the grace of God any more than 
he does when he begins to find a good deal of satis- 
faction in looking at himself. 



There is not a church on earth but that may have 
a rcz'ival as soon as it zvill comply zmth God's con- 
ditions — " Bring all the tithes into the storehouse." 



122 



THE IN GLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



LIFE AMONG OUR EARLY SETTLERS. 



BY J. GRANT FIGLEY. 



The advance of this country was necessarily slow 
for the forests were gigantic. Almost the whole sur- 
face was covered with trees of the largest size. The 
labor and patience that have been expended in felling 
these trees and preparing the fields for the plow, the 
reaper and mower, will never be appreciated except 
by those who have performed the labor, or seen its 
slow progress. Years of this toil have been already 
expended, and the work is far from being completed. 

The first habitations of the people were log cabins ; 
not such a log cabin as has stood on the Centennial 
grounds where the roof was of pine shingles nailed on, 
the gutter of pine boards, the door neatly made, and 
the windows filled with sash full of glass. The cabins 
of our pioneers were made of round logs, cut only 
at the corners, their roofs of clapboards as they were 
split from the trees, held to their places by poles built 
into the end logs. The opening for doors and win- 
dows were not closed except at night, and then by a 
quilt or skin. 

The Fireplace 

was built of logs and the chimney of sticks, all lined 
with clay, the whole chinked, that is, the cracks were 
filled in with wood and daubed with clay. Such a house 
was built by the neighbors gathering together and was 
often finished in a day. The floors were of puncheons 
split from the trees. When all was done a puncheon 
scouring took place. The young people and old gath- 
ered at the house for a dance, if a fiddle could be 
procured, and if not, then the men took turns in 
whistling the music, and with more relish than a 
modern ball they danced all night in the new cabin. 

A wedding engaged then the attention of the whole 
neighborhood, and the frolic was anticipated by old 
and young with eager anticipation. In the morning 
the groom and his attendants started from his father's 
house to reach the bride's before noon, for the wed- 
ding, by the inexorable law of fashion, must take place 
before dinner. There were not many tailors in those 
days. 

The men dressed much in shoepacks, moccasins and 

Leather Breeches, 

leggins, linsey-woolsey or buckskin hunting shirts, all 
home-made. The women were dressed in linsey petti- 
coats, and linsey or linen gowns, coarse shoes, stock- 
iiigs, handkerchiefs and buckskin gloves, if any. If 
there was jewelry it was the relic of the old times. 
The horses, for all came on horseback, were 
caparisoned with saddles, bridles or halters, pack sad- 
dles, with blankets thrown over them, and a rope or 
a string for a girth or reins as often as leather. They 
formed a procession as well as they could along the 



narrow roads. Sometimes an ambuscade of mischiev- 
ous young men was formed who fired off their guns 
and frightened the horses, causing the girls to emit 
loud shrieks. Sometimes " a race for the bottle " took 
place by two or more of the young men racing over the 
rough road to the bride's house, the victor to receive 
a bottle of whiskey, which he bore back in triumph 
and passed it along the procession for each one to take 
a drink in turn. Then came the arrival at the bride's 
house, the ceremony, the dinner and the dance, all 
conducted with the greatest fun and frolic till morn- 
ing. Sometimes those who were not invited would 
revenge themselves by cutting off the mane, foretop 
and tails of the horses of the wedding party. 

The Log-RoUing 

harvesting and husking-bees for the men, and the 
quilting and apple-butter making, etc., for the women, 
furnished frequent occasions for social intercourse and 
gave ample opportunity for any neighborhood to know 
and appreciate the good and bad qualities of each 
other. 

The rifle shooting was a pastime which men loved, 
as it gave an opportunity of testing their skill with 
the necessary weapons of defense, and means often of 
subsistence. 

Wild game of all kinds was ever plenty. Pioneers 
out of meat could quite often stand on the door- 
step and shoot enough squirrels, turkeys, etc., to last 
all day, and even sometimes shoot a deer or bear in 
that way. Some of the early settlers in warm weather 
had a blanket or quilt hung up for a door, and often 
prowling wolves would poke their heads past the 
hanging to see what was inside. If there was a light 
in the room or a fire in the - fire place, the wolf 
would dodge out, otherwise he might come in and 
perhaps cause some trouble. Windows were scarce, 
in fact for a long time all the windows used were 
large sheets of greased paper fastened to the wall over 
an opening, to let in light. Some houses had no 
windows at all. A cow could have fallen through 
their large chimneys. Beds were often made with 

Only One Leg. 

Now don't laugh, I am giving nothing but the plain 
old-fashioned truth. A forked stick cut the proper 
height for a bed was inserted in a hole bored in a 
corner of the room probably six or seven feet from one 
side and three or four from the other. Then a stout 
pole was pushed into the crack between two logs and 
the other end across the fork on the stick. The same 
way another stick was placed for the foot of the bed. 
Then clapboards, hand split, were fitted into the crack 
along the side of the house and pinned to the pole 
with wooden pins driven into holes bored through the 
board into the pole. The poles were fastened to the 
forked stick with bark withes or leather strings. And 



THE I NGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



123 



there was your bed. Tables were made by pinning 
slabs together with wooden pins, like the modern ex- 
tension table tops join, or by pinning a cleat on the 
under side. The legs were made of poles driven in 
holes bored in the corners of the table top. Chairs 
were made of puncheon slabs cut in squares with legs 
put in the same as in the tables ; some were three- 
legged. 

Girls were tauglit how to spin and 

Weave Flax and Wool, 
to make clothing, and all about every branch of house- 
work, and often girls took delight in seeing how ex- 
pert they could be in turning pancakes baked on a fire 
place, not in iron skillets, but on griddles hung on a 
hook over the fire. A broadbladed knife would be 
slid under the cake ; a dextrous twist of the wrist 
would turn the cake completely over with the raw side 
next the griddle ; some even succeeding in making a 
double turn of the cake. These gifts were usually 
sho\vii off the very best before company or chance 
lodgers passing through the country. But the girl who 
unluckily flipped her cake into the fire in turning it, 
or broke it, or scorched it, was unmercifully " guyed " 
by the others. 

Included under this head will be considered other 
phases of matters connected with farm life. In the 
first place, there are probably many who do not know 
that in the " good old days " of wild-cat banks and 

" Shin-Plaster " Currency, 
there was no settled post-office system, and as there 
were no postage stamps used in the United States 
before 1847, postage was either paid by the sender or 
collected from the receiver. Envelopes came into use 
in 1830, but for a long time after that letters were 
forwarded without envelopes, being interlapped and 
fastened with red sealing wax. 

Steel pens came into use in 1830 and for years be- 
fore and after that people laboriously scrawled their 
letters and other documents with pens made from 
quills or large feathers, yanked from the bodies of 
geese. I have made quill pens that did fair work, but 
I do not fancy them. Ink was made of the boiled 
down juice of walnuts or oak bark set with a liberal 
supply of copperas. Paper was made of a very stout 
and durable make and one sheet fifty years ago was 
worth more than a whole handful of our modern 
paper. 

Matches for striking fire came into use in 1829, and 
were a Godsend to the people, though they were a great 
deal more expensive than now. People were in the 
habit of making fire with flint and steel ; many carried 
a little box enclosing a flint, a piece of steel, and 

A Piece of Punk, 
which is a fair quality of rotten wood, to light 
their fires. Some even rubbed two dry sticks together 



and produced fire. When people were without these 
things they had to go to a neighbor after fire when 
their fire would go out. 

Kerosene oil came into use for illuminating pur- 
poses in 1826 though for quite a while after that tallow 
candles as before were used for lighting the houses. 
The candles were made in moulds holding from six 
to a dozen candles. Cotton wicks were doubled and 
inserted through the mould and fastened at each end 
by small sticks or rods. The melted tallow was then 
poured in and left to cool. Some kinds of lights used 
were dishes or tin or pewter vessels holding a quan- 
tity of tallow or lard in which a piece of cloth 
was placed allowing one end to rest on the edge of the 
vessel, which was the end lit. 

Farmers cut their grain with sickles for a long time, 
then scythes and grain cradles came into use, then the 
mower and reaper and now the grandfather can lean 
on the fence and watch his grandson with the latest 
improved binder which cuts and binds the grain and 
drops off a whole shock at a time for the help to shock 
up. In those good old days farmers threshed out their 
grain by trampling their yoked oxen over it until the 
grain was all tramped out. Then flails came into use 
and after seeing how many times they could bang their 
heads off with these flails, they became so expert that 
they could bring the business end of a flail within 

One-Sixteenth of an Inch 

of their respective noses nine times out of a pos- 
sible ten, without any stars being projected into the 
firmament. After a while the first threshing machines 
called " crow picks " came into use. The grain, chaif 
and straw all come out together and had to be pitch- 
forked into the air and thus the grain was gradually 
cleaned. Now the self-feeding, self-stacking thresher 
does the work of from six to ten men. From loading 
and unloading hay by hand, some persons now have 
hayloader and hayrakes and mow the hay away with 
the old-fashioned swing and pulley hay fork or the 
more improved hay harpoons. When the farmer 
wants to communicate with some one in A or B or 
some other place, he telephones or runs over on a bi- 
cycle, whereas not so very many years ago he wrote a 
letter that reached its destination in a week or so, and 
had to pay a shilling postage, or drove his team of 
oxen over a muddy 

Corduroy Road, 

or went horseback and took a general farewell of his 
family and friends before starting out on his labori- 
ous trip. And though the railroads were only for the 
rich and fortunate, many probably never thinking that 
they would likely see a steam car in their neighbor- 
hood, much less have their threshing done by steam 
power, in the probably not far distant future the elec- 
tric railroad may connect him more and more with 
the busy world about him. 



124 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



Farmers plowed their land with wooden plows 
drawn by oxen, plodding methodically along, finally 
to give way to the self-adjusting riding plow drawn 
by a fine team of horses caparisoned in up-to-date 
harness. Heav_v, lumbering wagons were used in 
transportation and riding often going many miles be- 
fore reaching market. To-day the bicycle and the 
automobile, the pink-wheeled barouche, surrey and 
phaeton take the lead on getting there with neatness 
and dispatch. 

When farmers were out of money, which was the 
rule and not the exception, they paid their- debts with 
deer hides, coon skins, bear hides, etc., often paying 
for their farms and paying their taxes in that way. 

Corn Bread and Pork 

fattened on mast (fruit of forest trees, as acorns, etc., ) 
was a very general diet. Farmers generally raised 
flax or sheep which gave them the material for their 
clothes, generally woven by the wives and daughters, 
and their shoes were made from skins tanned and 
prepared from the first to the last by the sturdy farm- 
ers and their sons. And who shall say that these old 
pioneers, makers of their own clothes and fortunes, 
were not as happy or perhaps happier than are their 
descendants? Who knows? 

I am afraid that the common-schooling of our early 
settlers was rather meager, and was confined mostly 
to a thorough knowledge of the " three Rs," — 

Reading, 'Riting and 'Rithmetic. 

The teachers of those days were sometimes kind and 
good men and women, but too often they were people 
who taught school because disease or physical disa- 
bility of some kind prevented them from doing any- 
thing else. They were glad to get their board and 
clothes if nothing more, by making the rounds of the 
district with the patrons in turn, and like Ichabod 
Crane, were often quite welcome. Their book knowl- 
edge would often easily shame a ten-year-old boy of 
this progressive age, but the teacher generally made up 
his deficiency in education in his ability to thrash 
the pupils under his care, on the least provocation. 

Some of those early teachers must have taken les- 
sons of the Indians, for I have heard tell of the pun- 
ishment inflicted by them that would have done credit 
to an Indian. Such teachers usually carried a stout 
cane or long whip called a " gad," which when vigor- 
ously used would cover a pupil with black and blue 
marks and leave them sore and lame for days ; and in- 
deed. 

Cripples for Life 
were sometimes caused by these educational Sullivans, 
and sometimes the punishment would be so cruel as to 
cause death, or what would be almost as bad, life-long 
debility from the shock received by the nervous sys- 
tem by prolonged punishment of an aggravating if not 
really severe corporal nature. One mode of punish- 



ment was to gather the pupil's fingers on one hand' 
closely together and slap and pound the* ends with a 
heav}' rule or ferule, which caused great pain as well as 
crushing the nails and often deforming the fingers. 
Another way was to violently slap the palm of the 
hand with a heavy ferule, while the fingers were tight- 
ly bent backward. The pain was intense, and the 
hand would be bruised and swollen for weeks, and 
sometimes the hand would be permanently lamed or_ 
crippled. And the worst of it was, that little children 
were as liable to severe punishment for trifles as older 
ones were for other offenses. 

Teachers in those days were not required to pass an 
examination or have a certificate in order to teach, and 
did the best they could according to what they knew. 
In fact, in isolated instances, the teacher had to de- 
pend upon himself in the preparation of lessons for 
class use, if no books were at hand. Alphabets were 
printed and written with the proverbial quill pen made 
by the teacher, with ink made of the juices of roots and 
barks, on paper gotten no one knows where or how, 
and pasted on 

Shingles and Slabs 

made like unto paddles which could be studied from 
both sides at once, and in case of need, was used upon 
the person of the refractory pupil. For reading, the 
New Testament was much used, even after reading- 
books were brought into use. 

I have in my library a United States history, by C. 
B. Taylor, bound in leather, and issued in 1830; also 
Daniel Adams' school arithmetic ; also James H. Con- 
nolly's arithmetic, "the Ohio Accomptant," published 
at Pittsburg, Pa., in 1829. These are fine samples of 
the early school books. I also take pleasure occasion- 
ally, in examining the copy-and-sum book of my uncle, 
Jason Figley, made in the winter of 1835-36, when he 
was a lad of thirteen, in Columbiana county, Ohio ; 
also the sum-book of my grandfather, Simon Figley, 
made in the winter of 1808-9, '" Columbiana county, 
Ohio, when he was fourteen years old. 

The school-houses our early settlers used were at 
first rooms in the private house of some patron. I 
know one school-teacher who was, when an 
infant, rocked in a 

Sugar-Water Trough 
used for a cradle, while his mother taught the neigh- 
borhood children. School-houses were built without 
nails, glass, or blackboards. Wooden pins fastened the 
benches and desks together, greasea paper was used 
for windows, and enormous fire-places took the place 
of stoves. Of course the hinges were of wood, and the 
door was fastened by the good old latch-string. Backs 
to the seats were not always to be had, and the seats 
and other furniture were made of split slabs and pun- 
cheons, and naturally not free from splinters. In the 
spring of 1889 I chanced upon one of these school- 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



12: 



houses yet in use, in ATichigan, but alas! there were 
glass windows, a blackboard, a stove and an organ 
added to the fixtures. The fireplace was boarded 
about on three sides and overhead, and held the or- 
gan, and the stove-pipe entered the chimney above and 
near tlie ceiling. 

The reading matter of the old pioneer days was lim- 
ited very naturally, yet, even if newspapers were 
scarce, those I have seen compare very favorably in- 
deed with those of our own day. I have twenty-two 
copies of " The Historical Family Library," published 
by David Christy, at Cadiz, Ohio, from 1834 to 1836, a 
16-page sheet, about the size of the Gospel Messenger, 
and which contained such solid reading matter as 
Hallam's " Europe in the Middle Ages," Chambers' 
" Rebellion in Scotland,"' etc. I presume the usual 
family book list was about the same as the set that was 
handed down to me; viz: The Bible (the small Bible 
I have was printed somewhere about 1652-82,) " The 
Life of God in the Soul of Man," (my copy was print- 
ed in 1813), Bunyan's works, Doddridge's "Rise and 
Progress of Religion in the Soul," Mason's " Self- 
Knowledge," and " A Pastor's Gift to the Awakened 
Sinner." Of one thing we may be assured, there was 

no 

Blood-and-Thunder, 

sensational, yellow-backed literature to poison the 
minds and morals of the rising generation, to say noth- 
ing of their elders. 

Church-going people in the early days depended to 
a great extent upon the traveling or wandering preach- 
ers, quite often holding services in private houses, but 
more often schoolhouses, and often in the woods. It 
seems to me that Methodist and Brethren (they were 
Dunkards in those days) preachers predominated in 
some localities, though other denominations, more 
generally Baptists, came next. My mother says that 
when she was a child more than fifty years ago, the 
Brethren preachers were about the only kind she ever 
heard, and that love feasts were held in private houses 
by the faithful few. 

Sunday schools were practically unknown and 
whenever held, were conducted much on the same 
plan as they now are, with the natural exceptions of 
stated lessons not being given, no papers or lesson- 
leaves were to be had, the Bible and hymn book ( usu- 
ally Watts') being the only books used. I am afraid 
that the religious services were not always interesting 
to the little children, who were obliged 

To Sit for Hours, 
sometimes, and listen to long sermons and exhorta- 
tions too profound for their comprehension, some- 
times in cold or badly ventilated rooms, and without 
the proper appreciation by their elders of their child- 
ish wants and requirements. 

The children of to-day ought to be doubly grateful 



that the public schools of our fair land are so carefully 
conducted, and every new method of instruction tested 
for their especial benefit. They ought also to be 
doubly grateful for the church and Sunday-school 
privileges they possess, so many hundred per cent 
better than their grandparents had. I am quite sure 
If they realized the pleasure their ancestors derived 
from church services, few and far between as they 
often were, and the inconveniences they often under- 
went in order to have them, even though the little 
children were not always properly looked after in that 
respect, they would gladly do all in their power to help 
along the good work, and not carelessly or thought- 
lessly let precious moments pass wherein they might 
be sowing good seed IN HIS NAME. 
Bryan, Ohio. 

♦J* ^ ^* 

A WOMAN ENGINEER. 



The town of Scituate, Mass., has a fullfledged wom- 
an engineer. She is Mrs. J. W. Truworthy, daugh- 
ter of John Smith, a retired sea Captain of Scituate. 
Her husband is a marine engineer employed by the 
Long Island Railroad Company. 

" I never had a bit of trouble and they all used me 
first rate," said Mrs. Truworthy when asked how men 
regarded her invasion in that field of labor. 

Mrs. Truworthy has an engineer's license and has 
traveled considerably with her husband. At times 
her knowledge of his work has made her very useful. 
She has had many adventures which would not have 
been relished by other women. 

" I was always interested in machinery," said Mrs. 
Truworthy, " but should not have • learned so much 
about it had it not been for my husband. We were 
living in Island Falls, Maine, and my husband was 
working on a little craft on Silver Lake. Only one 
other man was helping him and they found I could be 
of assistance to them occasionally. I learned all about 
the machinery very readily and soon could run the 
steamer. 

" Eight years ago I applied for and received an 
engineer's license to run a boat on the fresh waters 
in the state of Maine. A short time afterward my 
husband secured a place as engineer of the steamer, 
Francis J. Murphy, and I was aboard that craft for 
nine months. 

" The men treated me fairly. They did not swear 
very much and the Captain said that was a good thing 
for them. I used to do mending for the men and they 
appreciated that. If any treat was ever brought 
aboard the crew was sure to see to it that I had my 
share." 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

An oat straw will suction up a sherry cobbler in 
four minutes and a half by the watch. — Josh Billings. 



126 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



IMPORTANT ATTRIBUTES IN THE ACQUIRE- 
MENT OF DISTINCTION. 



BY ETHA A. EVANS. 



Some may become great, in one sense of the word, 
appearing as brilliant meteors with the indications of 
being greatness personified but like- all aerolites they 
suddenly lose their brilliancy and their true characters 
are disclosed. " All the clamor over the laurels the 
unworthy wear is needless." 

Enduring greatness requires a backing of many 
things. I think that the cardinal requisites of great- 
ness are a definite aim in life, a pure heart, honesty, 
sincerity, unselfishness, moral courage and self-con- 
trol. 

Without a definite aim one can accomplish naught. 
Once having aimed at a thing then the quality of 
stick-to-it-ive-ness should be cultivated and brought 
into play. One cannot hope to succeed if one's heart 
becomes faint at every obstacle that is encountered 
along the way. Only by bravely surmounting the 
petty trials and temptations can one become efficient 
to meet the greater difficulties that frequently arise. 

Christ in his sermon on the Mount said : " Blessed 
are the pure in heart, for they shall see God." Matt. 
5:8. A pure heart is a necessity and is the well- 
spring from which all noble aspirations arise. If the 
heart is impure the mind becomes contaminated and 
naturally inclined to wicked and abhorrent thoughts. 
In this passage from the Bible do we find proof of 
this. " Unto the pure are all things pure, but unto 
them that are defiled and unbelieving is nothing pure ; 
but even their mind and conscience is defiled." Titus 
1:15. " One's deeds portray their character in the 
strongest colors." If one's heart is filled with wicked 
impulses then one's deeds are and continue evil and 
one is a curse to mankind. 

Then honesty is always the safest and best policy 
to pursue. It is best to be sincere also for people are 
not so blind as some think and insincerity deceives 
no one. It does not take long to tell the spurious 
from the genuine coin. Tenderness is a sign of a 
good heart and does not denote weakness as some 
would have it appear. How quickly any one wins 
one's confidence by their tender manner and unself- 
ish deeds. Unselfishness is the noblest quality of the 
human mind and stands preeminent above all other 
virtues. 

Then again one can not be great in the true sense 
of the word unless they depend on themselves and 
not lean on someone else for support. Self-reliance 
is the secret of all individual growth and vigor, the 
magic key which unlocks the door of every profession 
or calling in life. Only ceaseless activity can promote 
progress and maturity. Food easily acquired means 
food without that accompaniment of discipline which 



is infinitely more valuable than the food itself. " An 
idle Hfe " says Goethe " is death anticipated." " The 
world owes me a living " is the saying common to the 
shiftless and indolent. The loafer who never does 
a useful thing in his life belongs to this class. God 
never intended that strong independent beings should 
be reared by clinging to others like the ivy to the oak. 

One of the best victories man can win is the vic- 
tory he gains over himself. One must learn to con- 
trol one's proneness to evil and those propensities 
which, if uncurbed, would eliminate all the noble traits 
with which one may be endowed. I do not believe 
there is a single soul, it matters not how degraded, how 
depraved their morals may be, but what has a spark 
of good in them. Perhaps their hearts may be like 
a garden overrun with weeds, but tucked away in some 
unexpected place is a flower born to blush unseen. 

Buford, N. Dak. 

♦ 4> ♦ 

HOW ANIMALS MINISTER TO OUR COMFORT. 



BY H. M. BARWICK. 



A Kansas blizzard brings our woolen clothes into 
use and a little meditation as we proceed brings this 
article into its present form. The wool industry is 
one of the first magnitude to-day. How we could get 
along without this comfortable commodity I do not 
know and yet it is very seldom that we refer these 
common everyday luxuries back to their origin. How 
the wild goat and sheep have been developed from the 
wild, short-furred animal of the mountains up to their 
present domestic state with such abundant fleeces of 
the finest wool annually is well known to him who 
chooses to know. Fortunes are made with these ani- 
mals every year both from their wool and their flesh 
as food. After wool comes the fine silk of the silk 
worm. The home of this industry is in the Orient. 
Again, millions are invested in this little cocoon 
which yields much satisfaction to our bodily needs. 
In addition to the wool and silk I want to speak of 
the more important condition that exists in northern 
countries. In the temperate and tropical countries 
substitutes could be found for wool and silk but not 
so in the far north. Here the fur clothing which 
nature has given to the animals is absolutely necessary 
for man's life. Nothing else can take its place. No 
one but he, who has rolled up in a fur coat, knows of 
the extreme warming qualities which it possesses over 
any other texture. It is also in the north countries 
that nature has placed the fur bearing animals so that 
man's needs may be fully met. Southern people little 
think of the immensity of the fur trade in the world. 
Statistics are not available but just the seal trade 
off the coast of Alaska pays for that country several 
times over in each decade. 

The skin of an extra good otter often sells for 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



127 



$1,000, while that of the silver fox of Canada sells for 
$150. The broad prairies of Northwest Canada 
abound in fur bearing animals but these will soon be- 
come extinct. This does not mean that the fur trade 
will then fail for the many rivers and numerous inland 
lakes will still continue to be the home of millions of 
the smaller fur bearing animals that yield rich returns 
to the trapper. Besides these are the unexplored re- 
gions between Lake Superior and Hudson Bay where 
the native red man lives as he did before the white 
man knew of this country, and where wild game of 
many varieties propagate their species in great abun- 
dance. 

All through this north country, the Hudson Bay Co., 
organized in 1670, still flourishes in its monopoly of 
the fur trade with the natives. It is said that the 
poor Indian gets but a meager sum for all his hazard 
and exposures to hunger and cold in trapping in these 
bleak regions. As a rule he exchanges his furs, 
whether few or many, for some trinket that strikes 
his fancy, and then before he gathers another winter 
crop he runs a bill at the station store of the Hudson 
Bay Co. who takes a claim on his next year's work 
so that his furs are bartered away before he has them 
and he is always bankrupt and at the mercy of his 
superiors in business. 

Waterproof clothes are also made from the skins 
and intestines of some animals, so that with the 
warmth their furs afford us, the food their flesh gives 
us, the labor their stout bodies perform for us let us 
again think kindly of our animal friends for such 
they are. 

We have said nothing of the influence that animals 
have upon our moral nature. Touching incidents 
prove the affection which some trained animals have 
for a kind master; then the beautiful birds and their 
sweet songs enrich our aesthetic nature every day. 
Some animals even teach men and women some good 
lessons on purity of life and parental deportment. 

McPherson, Kansas. 

* * * 

WILL THE GREAT SALT LAKE SOON 
DISAPPEAR? 



That the Great Salt Lake is certain in the near 
future to disappear from the map has long been the 
belief of scientists. That its disappearance will come 
much sooner than has been expected, and possibly 
within a quarter of a century, is the conclusion that 
has been reached by certain investigators who have 
recently made careful studies of its fluctuations. 

In an article in a recent number of the Scientific 
American an account is given of some of these in- 
vestigations. One calculation is made from an exami- 
nation of the surface level of the lake, which for 
thirty years has been steadily lowering, with only a 



single period of rising tendency. In the last sixteen 
years the net fall has been eleven and a half feet, and 
in the last three years it has been three feet. Inasmuch 
as the rate of fall is increasing, and as the deepest part 
of the lake has only forty feet of water, this form of 
calculation indicates that the lake will be dry within 
forty years at the outside. 

Another calculation is based on the cubic contents 
of the lake at the present time as compared with the 
contents in 1886, when adequate measurements on 
which to base an estimate were made. By this method 
the disappearance of the lake is scheduled to occur 
within twenty-five years. 

Three theories have been suggested to account for 
this tendency. One is evaporation, another irriga- 
tion, and the third that there exists a subterranean out- 
let. The last mentioned theory is little better than a 
guess, but the first theory is unquestionably true to 
a certain extent, though whether it will account for 
the rapidity with which the level has been lowered 
in recent years is doubtful. As for irrigation more 
evidence can be produced to show its effects in de- 
creasing the water supply of the lake. Irrigation was 
commenced by Brigham Young in the forties, but it 
was not till 1880 that it was adopted on a large scale, 
and it is within the period since then that the lowering 
of the level has been most swift. 

There are indications on the mountain sides, and 
also on the nine mountainous islands in the lake, that 
the depth of the water was once 600 feet greater than 
at present. We are therefore witnessing now the 
speedy completion of a physical change that has been 
in progress for many centuries. Most great physical 
transformations of the surface of the globe move so 
slowly that they will give evidence of themselves on 
the map only after many generations. This one bids 
fair to make a material difference in the geographies 
which our children's children will study. 

* * ♦ 
TRAINS WEIGHED IN MOTION. 



Railway men in Great Britain have a device for 
weighing a freight train in motion which will save 
much time in shunting. It is the invention of W. and 
T. Avery, of Birmingham. The train is drawn over 
the weighbridge at the rate of about three miles an 
hour, and as each car passes over the weight is in- 
stantly recorded on a dial or clock face with accuracy. 
This result is attained by cutting away a portion of 
the permanent way at each end of the weighing plat- 
form and substituting short lengths of rail, which 
rest at one end on pedestals upon the permanent . way 
and at the other upon the girders of the weighbridge. 
This gradually transmits the load to the levers of the 
weighbridge. The device allows a great many more 
trains to be dealt with a day. 



128 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



THE TEACHERS OUTSIDE OF THE SUNDAY 
SCHOOL CLASS. 



BY LOTTIE M. BOLLINGER. 



As the Sunday school is the only place where hun- 
dreds, yes, thousands of poor and ignorant children 
hear the Bible read, or are taught how to become joint- 
heirs with Christ, and inherit eternal life, it may prop- 
erly be called the Bible school. 

It is through this Bible school that we receive most 
of our members into the church ; hence the church may 
be called the granary of the soul, and the Bible school 
the harvest field from which she gathers the grain. 

Now, let us notice the size of this field; may we 
measure it in rods and acres ; class or tribes ? I hear 
all say, " No," and yet that is what too many of us are 
doing: but we should say that it includes the entire 
world, and every race, every tongue, kings on the 
throne, beggars on the highway, rich and poor, sick 
and afflicted, those near by and far off, constitute the 

Grain to be Grathered; 

and until we have drawn all or nearly all of these into 
our Bible schools for instruction, we have not fulfilled 
the Savior's wish or command as given to his disciples, 
" Go ye therefore, and teach all nations," etc., (Matt. 
28: 19), and we have set at naught the ideas expressed 
in Rom. 14: 11, and Philpp. 2: 10, 11. 

And when are we to gather this grain? Now is the 
time (2 Cor. 6:2), and unless we avail ourselves of 
the opportunity given us, we will be forever too late 
for we know not what a day will bring forth, or how 
soon God will call us to come home ; so let us all be up 
and doing, for we may all become reapers of this grain 
if we will and Christ would wish it to be so. 

He evidently realized a 

Scarcity of Laborers 
in his Father's vineyard for in instructing the seven- 
ty chosen disciples which he sent out two by two, he 
says, " The harvest truly is great, but the labourers 
are few : pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that 
he would send forth labourers unto his harvest " 
(Luke 10: 2). So if we are truly his disciples or 
reapers, if from any cause we cannot do more, we can 
at least do this much for the cause of Christ. 

Perhaps the reason for this instruction in the time 
of Christ was the same as it is to-day ; a lack of con- 
sistency on the part of many labourers ; for while we 
cannot shift the responsibility of our life upon an- 
other's shoulders (Rom. 14: 12), we are responsible 
for the influence which our lives have over others ; 
for we are admonished to put no 

Stumbling-block 

in another's way (Rom. 14 : 13), but unless we are very 
careful as teachers that is what we will do. 



It is not only the ones who are active workers in 
the Sunday schools who are teachers, but in a sense all 
are teachers, especially those who have the means 
for their own instruction at their command Gal. 
6:6), teachers, and reapers either in the vineyard of 
Christ, or the vineyard of the devil ; because we can- 
not serve two masters. (Matt. 6: 24.) Which is it to 
be? 

Are we going to waste the few years which God has 
given us, in selfish and indulgent living, living only for 
ourselves and our own selfish pleasures ; pleasures, 
designed and originated by the devil ; or are we going; 
to resolve to tread 

The Rugged Path 

which Christ trod before us in order to gain a crown of 
everlasting life, a life of joy, peace and happiness ? 

This question each one of us should consider care- 
fully and pra)-erfully and answer for ourselves. 

Of the teachers outside of the Sunday-school class 
there are two classes, viz : Christian professors and 
nonprofessors. The first class may be subdivided 
into 

Four Classes. 

First, ministers of the Gospel. To them we all more 
or less look for example, guidance and instruction,, 
hence they should study to prepare themselves for such 
by constantly studying and searching the Scriptures;; 
by praying for strength and power to do right, and 
only right in their everyday intercourse with their 
fellowmen ; for no matter how eloquent or powerful, 
their discourse is, if their life does not correspond to- 
it, their work has been all for naught, for sooner or 
later they are caught in their hypocrisy and ofttimes. 
have done more harm than good. 

Here is a little incident which came under my own 
personal observation, which proves this to be so. 

When about eighteen years of age, I went to teach 
in a district in which there were a good many young 
people who were constant attendants at the little coun- 
try church at that place, where there was a young 
minister whom everybody liked and in fact 

He Was Gentlemanly, 

polished and educated and his discourses were always 
plain and in the right direction. Nearly all of the 
young people were on the point of joining the church, 
when one evening his sermon was on dancing, revel- 
ries, gambling, etc., and he dwelt very strongly upon 
the great sin it was to indulge in any of those things ; 
and although at that place these things were carried 
on to quite an extent, most of the young people went 
home humbled and subdued, and feeling that he was 
right and they wrong. But during the following week, 
one evening several of the young men went to a small 
village about three miles away to attend a political 
speech and going into the saloon they 



THE INGLENOOK.— Fcl)i-uary 7, 1905. 



129 



Found Their Minister 

playing pool, and he had even gone so far as to stake 
money on the result of the game. Of course this soon 
spread among the church members and inhabitants of 
the district, but the members could do nothing for he 
was hired for a given length of time, and having no 
church government to deal with such cases, could not 
remove him, so he was allowed to stay, but what was 
the effect upon the young people? Some stopped at- 
tending church altogether, those who already be- 
longed backslid, while those that did attend went to 
visit or to make disturbance, and to my knowledge, 
to-day only three or four out of fifteen or twenty be- 
long to any church ; so you see in this instance he did 
more harm than good, and that is nearly always the 
case. 

The minister who can preach an eloquent sermon 
upon temperance, and yet dare not go to the polls and 
vote against the liquor traffic, or who is constantly 
seen in the saloon, 

Wastes His Time 
and talent. He must be honest, truthful and charitable 
in all his dealings ; living as near as he can to what he 
preaches, or else he is the devil's reaper and not 
Christ's. 

Second, officers of the church, such as bishops, 
deacons and elders. The life of these officers is plainly 
outlined in i Tim. 3 : 2-13 ; i Peter 5 : 2, 3 and Titus 
1 : 5-12, and unless they follow this life humbly and 
prayerfully with meekness in the fear of the Lord 
in their own homes there will be dissensions there and 
this unquietness will be communicated to the outside 
world, (even if he walk a blameless life elsewhere), 
his worK will have lost much of its good. 

Third, The teachers of the Sunday-school class 
themselves: No matter how regular and punctual in 
attendance; how well they have studied their lesson; 
or how well they can teach it ; if they are not punctual 
in keeping their business appointments or promises; 
honest in all their dealings; truthful, charitable and 
hospitable to all, and by constant prayer keeping them- 
selves from vice and wrongdoing as free as they 
can, putting their 

Heart and Soul 
into their work, in fact, they should live up to what 
they want others to follow. 

Fourth, The laymembers of the church : They are 
teachers also, for as they look to the ministers and 
officers of the church for instruction and guidance, 
so the outsiders or nonprofessors look to them for 
such or for criticism. 

To them I would say, Let us be above criticism in 
our daily life, if possible, and live a life such as Paul 
admonished Timothy to lead when he said, " Study tO 
shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that 
needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word 



of truth," (2 Tim. 2: 15,) and also in Paul's epistle 
to the Thessalonians, he says, " And that ye study to 
be quiet, and to do your own business, and to work 
with your hands as we commanded you ; that ye may 
walk honestly toward them that arc without, and that 
ye may have lack of nothing, (i Thcss. 4: 11, 12.) 

Of the second class of teachers or nonprofes.sors I 
shall direct my remarks principall)- to the parents or 
guardians. 

Parents, while the Christians and Sunday-school 
teachers may do much towards saving 

Your Child's Soul, 

that does not lessen your responsibility in the matter 
at all, for your child is the greatest blessing which 
God can bestow upon you, and upon you lies the duty 
to train it, or in other words you are its true teacher 
for Prov. 22 : 6 says, " Train up a child in the way he 
should go : and when he is old, he will not depart from 
it," and again Eph. 6 : 4 says, " And, ye fathers, pro- 
voke not your children to wrath, but bring them up in 
the nurture and admonition of the Lord," and how can 
you do this unless you set them the proper example? 
Can you expect them to grow up into honest, up- 
right. God-fearing men and women if they daily hear 
God's name taken in vain; see scenes of quarrehng, 
cruelty, dishonesty, unkindness and disrespect to one 
another and to God in your own home ; or if you allow 
yourselves to separate and figure in the divorce court, 
allowing the children to drift whither they will, among 
evil associates, among more evil influences, perhaps, 
tnan you gave them in your own unpeaceful home? 
Can you expect them to follow in other than your own 
footsteps which lead to degradation and crime, 
and unless you repent and 

Retrace Your Steps, 

to everlasting punishment? 

Mothers, as upon you falls most of the care of your 
child during its infancy, so upon you falls the duty 
of forming its first impressions which are more easily 
made at this time, ofttimes so strongly that Time can- 
not efface them ; you should therefore be very careful, 
and never allow your child to hear you use disrespect- 
ful, unclean or profane language; never promise any- 
thing that you cannot do; or tell anything that is 
not strictly true ; never allow it to talk disrespectful to 
you, or about its father or anyone else before you ; 
at all times enforce obedience and at as early an age as 
possible teach it to thank God for his mercy and good- 
ness, and to tell him its troubles; also take them to 
church and Sunday school and not send them alone. 
This is done by many and they think they have ful- 
filled their duty and never think they, themselves, 
are to blame if the child goes wrong but 

Say it is Luck 

or fate, or else shift the blame upon the shiouj- 



I30 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



ders of someone else, the poor Sunaay-school teacher 
perhaps, who, if conscientious, knowing too well what 
rests with her, is overburdened with the responsibility, 
when she sees the little she can accomplish, because 
of the disadvantage at which she is compelled to work, 
when she has the child only one or two hours out of 
one hundred and sixty-eight, once or twice a month, 
and sometimes not even that much, and then she has 
to counteract your influence, if wrong, without cast- 
ing reflections upon you to your child. Did you ever 
think of this and of what an injustice it really is? 

Now, fathers, no matter how good a wife you may 
have, or how good a mother to your children she can- 
not train them alone; she must have your cooperation 
and help and in no way can you do this better than 
by being obedient to your Father in heaven ; doing by 
the loved ones entrusted to your care as he would 
have you do ; by being a fit example for them to copy ; 
by taking them to divine worship as often as possible ; 
by- erecting a family altar, and living such lives as to 
be in accordance with the divine teaching. Then your 
children cannot go very far wrong, or if they do, they 
will generally return to their first-teaching, and you 
have the consciousness of knowing that you did your 
duty. 

If you do not, remember that they will be pun- 
ished accordingly, for the Father intended you for their 
instructor from the beginning; for he says that the 
iniquity of the fathers is visited upon the children 
even unto the third and fourth generation of them that 
hate him, and shewing mercy^ unto thousands that 
keep his commandments. (Deut. 5:9-10.) 

Once more, I beseech you to realize your responsi- 
bility in this matter and so teach your child that when 
he is old enough to leave your care and guidance, and 
launch out into the journey of life, he will be fit 
to cope with its cares and responsibilities, trials and 
temptations, and not 

Like a Ship 

at sea, which has lost its rudder, drifting about with- 
out any aims or ideals except mere worldy pleasures ; 
without any compass to guide his feet except his own 
will, and without any hope beyond this life. 

Now, all are teachers as our lives may influence 
others, for the Bible says that our lives are like a 
vapor which appears for a time and then vanishes 
away, but vapor leaves something behind it. Let us 
see what ! 

Vapor as we all know is moisture, usually 
clouds in the higher region of the atmosphere, but as 
all of the air contains more or less moisture so we 
have vapor floating all around us. When this vapor 
cools slightly, it condenses and covers everything with 
dew, which is beneficial especially if we have no rain 
for sometime, but if this dew becomes frozen, it is 
then frost which often destroys vegetation to such 



an extent as often to produce nearly a famine of some 
things, in some parts of the country. 

If it is chilled below the dew point it forms fog 
which in some places is so dense as to cause 

Great Loss of Life, 

especially is this so along the northern shores of 
North America and the banks of Newfoundland where 
many ships are wrecked. 

If it becomes cooled to any great extent it becomes 
too heavy to float, so forms into drops called rain, 
which is sometimes beneficial and sometimes so violent 
as to cause great destruction of life and property. The 
same with hail and snow, other forms of vapor, they 
are sometimes beneficial and sometimes destructive, 
but there is one fact which all of us may notice; as 
long as the vapor is at an even temperature, up high 
or not too cool it is beneficial, but just as soon as it 
becomes disturbed or cools too much it is destructive, 
so it is with our lives if we aim to lift ourselves to 
God, and do not allow ourselves to become cooled to- 
ward Christ by indulging in the sinful pleasures of 
this world, our lives will be beneficial to our fellow- 
men. We sometimes may not see the direct result of 
this influence and may not see it even during our life- 
time, but if we live a life of purity and goodness, it will 
leave its footprints somewhere. 

So fellow Christian workers, let us take the Bible 

for our leader, that is, Christ our great teacher, and 

not look to frail humanity for our guide, but let us 

endeavor to be sincere and consistent in the life we 

have chosen, and although the Sunday school is the 

harvest field for our work and we need more laborers, 

let us aim to lead such lives as will lead the parents 

and older ones into this field and then leave the result 

with God. 

Vestabiirg, Mich. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

OLD BILL. 



BY MAUD HAWKINS. 



A FARMER was the owner of an old horse which was 
noted for his peaceful habits. He was always just 
where he was wanted, and never showed any signs of 
spitefulness or ill-temper. His master generally dealt 
kindly with him, and provided well for him, 
but on one occasion, during a busy season 
of farming, he neglected to provide him with a 
new set of shoes when it was necessary that he 
should do so. Consequently his feet became tender 
and somewhat grown out beyond the remnants of the 
old shoes. Old Bill did not like this neglect very well, 
and did not try to conceal his feelings, but showed the 
state of his mind as plainly as a horse could. 

He evidently thought that the time had come when 
endurance had ceased to be a virtue. He was not the 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



131 



same honest old plodder as heretofore. The final crisis 
came while working in the cornfield. He acted very 
contrary, as his master thought. He pranced, kicked, 
tried to turn and do everything contrary to horse 
etiquette. His owner prevailed on him but to no effect, 
and the old farmer could not imagine what had come 
over the old trusty horse. Finally when the noon hour 
came, he was unhitched from the plow and turned 
loose in the road to find his own way to the stables, 
as had been the custom for fifteen years, and the 
horse had never been known to misuse the trust. 

But on this occasion he raised his ears and tail 
and with a determined look in his eyes, trotted down 
the road in the opposite direction, as fast as his crip- 
pled legs could carry him. Nor did he halt till he had 
reached the blacksmith shop, half a mile away, which 
he entered. And where his master, who had followed, 
found him standing quitely awaiting his turn. 

He gave the blacksmith permission to shoe him, 
after which he returned home and was the same faith- 
ful old plodder ever after, as long as he was provided 
with suitable shoes. His master had learned better 
than to treat him with neglect again. Who will still 
argue that dumb animals do not think ? 

Tozvanda, Pa. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

AFTER WHITE COAL. 



Every day sees more and more of the wasted power 
of waterfalls, which lie at man's disposal in every 
hilly or mountainous country, turned to use in fur- 
nishing electric energy. The power of waterfalls is 
driving the greatest of all tunnels, the double Simplon 
bore, through the Alps; it is sending another tun- 
nel, by devious ways, behind precipices and under 
glaciers to the summit of the snowy Jungfrau ; and a 
plan is now being perfected for constructing, once 
more with the aid of waterfalls, and to be run by 
them, when finished, a rival to the Simplon road, which 
shall cross the Alps between Turin and Martigny. 

Everybody knows what Niagara is doing, and how 
the waterfalls of California, and of other mountain- 
ous states, are being harnessed. 

A. A. Campbell Swinton, at a recent meeting of 
the British Association for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence, presented accurate statistics, which he had per- 
sonally collected, showing that no less than 1,500,000 
horse power derived from waterfalls is now being 
utilized in various parts of the world for the develop- 
ment of electric energy. Of this great total, which 
he believed did not represent the full truth, for he 
thought it probable that the real aggregate is 2,000,- 
000 horse power, nearly one-third must be credited 
to the United States. 

There is one feature of this utilization of water pow- 
er in place of steam power, which Mr. Swinton brought 



out, and which is seldom thought of, and that is the 
saving of coal which it effects. On the basis of 2,000,- 
000 horse power derived from waterfalls, this saving 
amounts to nearly 12,000,000 tons of coal per year. 

But the maximum amount of water-power that is 
available has not yet begun to be approached in 
actual civilization, so that the annual saving of coal 
must become larger and larger every year. This, in 
view of the increasing difficulty of working many 
coal mines, owing to the great depths to which they 
have penetrated, and in view of the approaching ex- 
haustion of some of the most famous fields, becomes a 
highly important consideration. Every little while the 
world is reminded, more or less sensationally, of a 
coming coal famine. The fact is that coal, of the 
better grades, possesses so many advantages and con- 
veniences as a fuel that the earth's supplies of it should 
be conserved for human use as long as possible. Men 
of science have more than once sounded a warning 
against the waste of coal, for coal is a gift of a geo- 
logical age which cannot be renewed. Thus waterfalls, 
by enabling us to spare coal, are performing an indi- 
rect service only less important than their direct serv- 
ice in supplying electric power. But for them the 
growing use of electricity would soon make a drain 
upon the coal mines of the most serious character. 

The era of waterfalls seems certainly to have dawned. 
Every great cataract will become a focus of industry, 
just as every great river valley has always been a 
center of population, and Prof. Brigham's prediction 
that Niagara is to be the industrial center of America 
may be fulfilled within a generation. 

* ♦ ♦ 
CAVERN RAT FINDS ITS WAY. 



The cavern rat found in the Mammoth Cave of 
Kentucky, is of a soft bluish color, with white neck and 
feet. It has enormous eyes, black at night, but quite 
unprovided with irises. 

These eyes are perfectly insensible to light, and 
when the experiment has been made of catching a 
cavern rat and turning it loose in the bright sunlight 
it blunders about, striking itself against everything, 
is unable to provide itself with food and finally falls 
down and dies. 

In its native depths, however, it is able to lead a 
comfortable enough existence, as its enormously long 
whiskers are so extremely sensitive that they enable it 
to find its way rapidly through the darkness. The 
principal food of the cavern rat consists of a kind of 
large cricket, of a pale yellow color, and which, like 
most cave dwellers, is perfectly blind., 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Better to be right than to be President. — Henry 
Clay. 



132 



THE I NGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



THE STORY OF AN ARROWHEAD. 



BY EMERSON COBB. 



LoNGj long ago, in the time of the French and 
Indian War, _ there was an old chief who ruled his 
tribe of braves in a quiet grove near a small stream. 
Here from day to day he would sit and smoke while 
his warriors were out in search of game or perhaps 
gone to a neighboring tribe to trade. He never took 
part in the war, but often one of the Indians of the 
engaged tribes would come to this chief, Catsha, the 
tiger, to buy arrows. 

One day as Catsha was sitting alone, there was a 
tall strong youth came to get arrows for his people. 
He was a handsome Indian, not so dark and brown, 
but rather fair for one of his race. As he approached 
the old man he bowed his head and said, " O chief ! 
I am sent by my master, Tallaloco, to buy arrows 
for the conflict with the " pale-faces," for they are 
seizing our fields of corn along the river." 

" Yes," he said in reply, " I will send arrows to 
my friend, the Chief. How many does he want?" 

" Ten quivers, if you have them." 

" Ten quivers," and, " I have them, for my braves 
know where the stream yields up the flint, and they 
are handy in the making of arrows. Ten quivers ! 
(This to himself.) Ten quivers ! Why do all the tribes 
come to me for arrows? Have we not the secret of 
how to make the flint soft while we work it? Ah! 
much of my younger days were spent in watching 
my father make the arrow. He made the arrow for 
the archer. He made the awl for women, and the 
needle. He made the tomahawk, the hatchet. Swift- 
ly flew his keen-edged arrows, always straight with 
whirling motion. Now the other generation, much 
younger braves have come to me. Come to me his 
son for counsel. (Aloud.) All right, lad, I have the 
arrows. Here take these. Now depart and speed 
toward him. T'ward the chief, Great Tallaloco." 

With these words he resumed his smoking, thought- 
fully, priding himself that other chiefs came to him 
to buy arrows and tomahawks. The youth soon 
disappeared among the foliage and departed to the 
home of his people and to the scene of conflict. 

That night among the whooping of Indians and 
the firing of guns a " pale-faced chief " lay moaning 
in the grass with a piercing arrow sticking in his side. 
The surgeon removed it and hurled it into the brush 
with contempt. It was a small narrow shaft with a 
keen edge, and the shape plainly told that it was one 
made by the chief, Catsha, and that is one that 
the youth had taken from the quiver and hid in the 
folds of his deerskin jacket, as he sped toward home. 

Many years after as I stopped to rest under the 
shading branches of a decaying oak, I noticed an 



arrowhead sticking in its massive roots. A close 
examination told that it was one of the styles peculiar 
to the western tribes. As I sat and intently studied it, 
it seemed to reveal to me a world of its history. 

'■ After lying in the grass for many years," it said, 
"some children found me and used me as an imple- 
ment in their play. Their father told them many 
stories about the wars that used to drench the land 
in blood; of massacres, war-dances and of the hor- 
rible tomahawks and scalping knives. From that time 
the sight of their little flint plaything carried with it 
a dread and a shiver of terror. They ceased to play 
with me and I became lost again. Years passed and at 
last a gentleman discovered where I was hiding and 
carried me away to a museum where at last I enjoyed 
a reunion with some of my old comrades. 

" How pleasant it was to lie in the warm case and to 
talk over past adventures and to have people com- 
ing in to look at us. There I recognized some of my 
brothers that were also made in the camp of Catsha and 
even some that were with me in the quiver. I also 
made acquaintance with the leaden ball that pierced 
the heart of the great Tallaloco and in that way made 
a decisive stroke in the downfall of the Indian Nation. 

" All was peace now. The tomahawk lay point to 
point with the sword and the fearful scalping knife 
nestled up closely against the scarred butt of the old 
musket. Skulls of chieftains were just across the 
room and I could behold the only remains of men who 
had driven me, true to the mark, into the heart of some 
victim. 

" But at last these joys of companionship came to an 
end, for One day an artist came and got me and took 
me out in the woods to make a sketch of me but he lost 
me and I again sought a rest among the leaves, at 
the roots of a strong oak. As the years passed the 
roots gradually grew around me until they had en- 
closed my point in them and there I now stick. Leave 
me I pray you, and let me remain here tmtil I crumble 
into my original form. The fierce warrior has long 
since gone to his happy Hunting Grounds where he 
will never be molested by war and will have no more 
use for points of flint for he will now shoot shafts of 
golden sunbeams ; paint his face with the light of joy 
and utter whoops in adoration of the name of the 
'Great Spirit.'" 

El gin J III. 

♦ ♦ * 

A BABY'S INFLUENCE. 



Who can resist a baby ? Perhaps some old bachelor 
will reply that he cannot only resist one, but that he 
would likewise consider it a good plan to drown them 
all as soon as they are born, in kitten fashion. Well, 
the man of this type is left out of this category al- 
together, and in asking who can resist one of these 
dear little helpless bits of humanity we mean who with 



lii: INGLENOOK.—l'cbruary 7, 1905. 



133 



a heart can turn a\\a_\ frcnn the ilinipled, clinging 
hands, or not be won over by the iiniocent baby smile. 
No matter where a baby appears its inlluence is felt. 

Let a mother and baby enter a car, and five out of 
ever_\- six will do nothing for the rest of the way but 
watch the baby, and the old gentleman with glasses, 
who had been absorbed in the reports of the stock mar- 
ket, will look pleased and smile down on the little mite 
wiio has taken such a fancy to his gold-headed cane 
and will even unbend so far as to beam upon the 
mother and sa) in his deep liass voice, " Very fine 
child, madam ; " and if by chance the little creature 
should smile up into his face or evince any desire to 
be more friendly, the austerity that frightens his clerks 
almost out of their wits and keeps them continually 
toeing the mark, will vanish entirely, and in its place 
will come an air of conscious superiority, as though 
the honor conferred upon him b}' the tiny morsel of 
humanity at his elbow has made him a trifle superior 
to those other of his fellow beings who had not re- 
ceived any such mark of distinguished consideration. 

Women, old and young, unless they are dwarfed 
in their true nature, always love babies. The mater- 
nal instinct is the strongest and best point of the 
feminine character, and from the time of doll dressing 
tip to the da}' when their lives are gladdened b}- the 
advent of a little stranger, they adore the winsome, 
helpless human beings that are dependent upon them 
for love and support. 

The thought of a curly head, a rosy mouth or a 
little lisping voice joyously calling "Papa" or 
" JNIamma," has kept many a man and woman from 
despair and the many dangers of life that are worse 
than death. 

Men bow to the rule of the small sovereign! A 
woman with a baby receives all the attention where 
one without may perhaps, be treated with absolute 
rudeness by the same person. Windows are opened 
or shut, seats given up and hands ready to help in any 
way toward the comfort of the atom of humanity 
who would probably reward their efforts by a con- 
tinuous whining and crying that keeps up from the 
beginning of the journey to the end. — Harper's Maga^ 
sine. 

* ♦ * 

HARNESS THE TIDES FOR WORK. 



Tide, with time, perhaps waits for no man. But 
it is now expected to work for at least one man — • 
namely, James Howarth, of Manchester, England, 
who claims to have completely solved the time-hon- 
Dred problem of utilizing the rise and fall of tides for 
industrial ends. He proposes to use the risings of the 
tide in compressing air with a unique scheme. The 
essential feature is the construction of a number of 
chambers in suitable positions to which the tide has 
access, and, entering the bottom of these chambers. 



the air is compressed as the water rises. He claims 
that a twenty-four-foot tidal rise would give over ten 
pounds per S(juare inch pressure, and that one acre 
of beach surface of this rise would supply over one 
hundred horse power. The compressed air is to be 
transferred into receivers situated on shore throXigh 
pipes. Pressure impressed water is to be used as an 
intensifying medium, the pressure bcing.impressed by 
the tidal rise, and air and water are preserved im- 
pressed ultimately as the process proceeds. The in- 
ventors submits that enough tidal power might be 
drawn from the British tidal coast to equal all the 
steam engine power employed in Great Britain ; also 
that the system could be applied to waterfalls and 
streams. 

*J* *J* ♦$* 

MUSICAL NOTES. 



BY MARGUERITE BIXLER. 



A NEW year. A new song. To thee, to me. what 
will it be? 

It is much better to reach the human heart than 
high C. 

About 1500 B. C. is the date given for the invention 
of the flute. 

Church bells were first suggested by Paulinus, an 
Italian bishop. 

The first writer to compose hymns in metrical form 
was Clement of Alexandria. 

Handel's harpsichord dated 1651 is at present time 
in the South Kensington Museum. 

If anybody's actions speak louder than words surely 
'tis those of the bass-drummer. 

The " Messiah " one of Handel's oratorios was 
written in seventeen days, in the year 1741. 

The first recorded hymn of the New Testament is 
the " Magnificat " sung by the Virgin Mary in the 
home of her cousin Elizabeth; the second is the " Ben- 
edictus " sung by Zacharias at the circumcision of 
his son, John the Baptist ; the third is the " Nunc 
Dimittus," sung by the aged Simeon in the courts of 
the Temple, when Jesus was brought there by Mary 
and Joseph. 

♦ *?> ♦ 

TAME RAT BRINGS RECRUITS. 



Captain Samuel Hull, who has a small cottage 
at Riverside, Conn., has tamed a large gray rat so 
that she is as docile as a kitten and comes at a call 
and eats out of a dish. Recently the rat appeared 
with three young ones, who are becoming as tame 
as their mother. 

♦ ■* ♦ 

I tell thee what, corporal. I could tear her. — 
Fozvler. 



134 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



THE INGLENOOK 

A Weekly Magazine 

PUBLISHED BY 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription price, $1.00 per Annum, in Advance. 

E. K. Cobb, Editor. 

The Inglenook contains twenty-four pages weekly, devoted 
to the Intellectual, moral and spiritual interests of the young. 
Each department is especially designed to fill its particular 
sphere in the liome. 

Contributions are solicited. Articles submitted are adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine. A strong eftort will 
be made to develop the latent talent of the constituency. 

Sample copies will be furnished upon application. Agents 
are wanted everywhere, and will be awarded a liberal com- 
mission. Change of address can only be made when the old 
address, as well as the new, is given. Club rates for Sunday 
schools and other religious organizations. Address as above. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



A SECOND-CLASS MAN. 



Who wants to be a second-class man? Who ever 
heard of a boy that was willing to be second-class? 
Did you ever see a man hunting a second-class job? 
Some men take second-class jobs, in fact many men do. 
Many men have to do so. Have you ever seen any- 
one whose ambitions only ask for a second-class place ? 
Generally second-class things are only had when first- 
class things are not obtainable. We wear second- 
class clothes and eat second-class meals as a matter 
of necessity and not preference. The goods in second- 
hand stores are sold to people who feel their inability 
to buy first-class goods, or, perchance, do it as a mat- 
ter of economy. 

For work that really amounts to anything, first- 
class men are wanted. Not one time in a thousand do 
you see a first-class man qualified and equipped for 
a first-class job who is out of a position. It is the 
second-class man who is not in place. Then why are 
there so many second-class men? It evidently is not 
because men want to be second-class. One reason is, 
many men are not willing to pay the price to be 
first-class men. Another reason may be that they have 
indulged in dissipation until their understanding is dull 
and slow, or their growth has been stunted ; and in- 
deed such seldom stop at second-class, but are often 
found much lower than that. 

A third reason why men are found in the second 
place is because their leisure hours and moments are 
spent in exhausting their strength and vitality, vitiat- 
ing their blood, shocking their nerves by a thousand 
different ways of abuse until the limbs tremble like 
leaves in the wind, their whole physical man being a 
nervous wreck. Such a man is only a half a man, 
and could in no sense be called first-class. Such per- 
sons are to be pitied ; they have lost their manhood, 
their character and their reputation. It is awfully 
hard, even if possible, for them ever to get above sec- 
ond-class. All the blame for this condition should 



not rest upon them either. We have hundreds of men 
to-day in first-class positions who are really competent 
to hold them, who care very little, if at all, whether 
anybody else in the world has a place or not. 

Aristocracy, arrogance, egotism, selfishness, vanity, 
all militate against real manhood in helping to support 
the downfallen, the overburdened and the unfortunate. 
Many a man has the proper mettle, but conditions 
are against him. Such men can be brought to the 
surface; other men have not the mettle, neither the 
conditions ; this is generally a hopeless case. There is 
a sufficient quantity of this class of men to fill all the 
second-class places, and it is not necessary to create 
more second-class places to accommodate men of first- 
class mettle, who, by proper development, could fill 
first-class positions. 

Labor is dignified. False impressions have gone 
out concerning labor, and labor has been classified 
many times upon a wrong basis. Labor may be classi- 
fied as to kinds, but not importance. Mental laborand 
physical labor are equally important. The only labor 
that is not dignified is that which does not have for 
its purpose the elevation and upHfting of mankind. 
Labor that tends to degrade, stupefy sensibility, or 
dull conscience is not dignified labor and belongs to 
second-class or worse than that. 

Who is willing to say, then, that he wants a place 
which will assist in the degradation of his people? 
Nobody's ambition is run that way. Such conditions 
exist because they are tolerated, not because they are 
sought for. Don't be satisfied to be a second-class 
man. 

GREATNESS. 



Many erroneous ideas are afloat to-day as to what 
true greatness really is. It is to be believed that the 
majority of persons confound greatness with fame. 
It is possible for great men and women to become 
famous, but it does not follow that all famous persons 
are necessarily great. It is possible for one to become 
so famous that his name is a household word even on 
the opposite side of the globe from which he resides, 
and yet he may be the very opposite of the truly great 
man. 

Evidently a majority of people imagine that wealth, 
vast estates, gigantic bank accounts, palaces and lux- 
ury make the possessors thereof great. This is a 
huge mistake. Does the world look upon Russel Sage 
as being a great man ? Although Barney Barnato pos- 
sessed so many millions that it was impossible for him 
to spend the interest with all his extravagance, and even 
committed suicide because of his inability to prevent 
the accumulation of fortune, yet who for a moment 
catalogues him with the world's great men ? 

Gold, bonds and mortgages, hired servants, palaces 
and broad acres, are possessions, not greatness. Great- 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



135 



ness is an individual attribute. Is power greatness? 
Some think so. This is another error. Muscular pow- 
er may bring a man to notoriety. John L. Sullivan, 
James Corbett, and Jim Jeffries are examples of phys- 
ical power and endurance, but they are great in no 
sense except from the basis of avoirdupois and beef. 
In fact the very opposite of true greatness is found 
in them. Another kind of power is illustrated in the 
official capacity of the czar of Russia. His is the on- 
ly Christian nation that boasts of an absolute mon- 
archy ; his word is law. Absolutely so. Technically 
so. It would require such attention of the mighty 
nation to see any greatness in his majesty that all the 
elasticity would be withdrawn. True greatness is for- 
eign to absolute authority, where it culminates in am- 
biguity and egotism. 

Physical power is a quality. Kingly power is a 
position. Financial power is an inheritance or an ac- 
cident. True greatness is none of these. It is abso- 
lutely within the power of every man to become great. 
Man, true man, woman, genuine woman, are the great- 
est works of creation. To be natural, simple, true, 
honest, earnest, generous, loyal, industrious — in other 
words to be just what the Creator meant us to be — is 
to be great. Anybody may be that. 
♦ ♦ * 
THE TALENT OF INDIVIDUALITY. 



People often give expression to the thought that 
in large audiences they are not able to find two faces 
alike. While it is common to note resemblances and, 
in some instances, find striking similarities, yet it is 
an utter impossibility to find two people who look 
exactly alike. People are inclined not only to wonder 
at this, but they often really feel grieved that people 
do not think and act just as they do, and seem to be 
reduced to heartlessness when people do not rally to 
the support of their opinion. Church members are of- 
ten found complaining because one of their ministers 
is not like the other. Communities often growl be- 
cause one schoolmaster differs from his predecessor. 
Politicians make campaign capital, with which to de- 
fraud the public, of the fact that one presidential can- 
didate is not the exact image of some time-honored 
statesman of days gone by. 

Why don't people stop to think that this principle 
belongs to God's economy, and there is absolutely no 
place in the world for the man that is exactly Hke the 
other one? Man is God's creature and God does his 
work sufficiently well that he has never yet been re- 
quired to duplicate it in order to make one good one. 
If one teacher or preacher is as good as another, why 
make the change? One man may be just as good as 
another, so far as good qualities are concerned, and 
yet not specially adapted to the situation. A polar 
bear may be just as good as a hippopotamus in the 
eyes of God, but they do not serve the same purpose 



nor live in the same place. Elijah was a good man, 
and so was Elisha, but he was in no way like Elijah, 
and that is the very reason why he was so well fitted 
to follow the great Carmelite. Had he been just like 
Elijah, the rig that came from heaven for Elijah would 
have been double seated, and Naaman would have died 
with the leprosy. Blades of grass look alike, but no 
two of them stand on the same spot. It is impossible 
to tell the egg of a terrapin from the egg of some 
fowls and only incubation is able to reveal the indi- 
viduality which the Creator has placed inside. 

Two seeds may be deposited in the earth that can- 
not be distinguished, and when nature has done her 
perfect work, one may develop into the poppy red 
and the other into yellow mustard. 

So don't be discouraged or feel despondent if your 
photograph to-day doesn't look exactly as it did when 
you were three years old, neither should you attempt 
suicide or disinherit a child, because strangers cannot 
decide whether the child resembles his father or his 
mother. Remember that there is a God-given talent of 
individuality. Everything stands for something. 
Things do not happen nor come by chance. Individu- 
ality is a law unto itself. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
MUNITIONS OF WAR. 



On every hand our government seems to be pre- 
paring for war. The legislators are asking for ap- 
propriations with which to increase our army and 
navy that they may meet whatsoever enemy may en- 
croach upon our rights of territory. At the same time 
the powers of the earth are pretending to establish 
peace commissions, treaties of peace and even erect 
a temple of peace. It seems queer that a nation of 
free and independent people who have every advantage 
of civilization should want to be making war with 
one hand and trying to establish peace with the other. 
It is hard to explain why, when we are trying so hard 
to establish arbitration, as the means of settling diffi- 
culty, that we should appropriate ten times as much 
for the cr.couragement of war as for the development 
of agriculture, or for the promotion of education. 

However, the hopeful side of the picture is that all 
over our wide land is being established academies and 
colleges, outside of our public school systems, which 
are the greatest munitions of war that this, or any oth- 
er, country can afford. It is to be hoped in the near 
future that war, intemperance and crime of every kind, 
will fade away before the impregnable phalanx of 
educators, which our country is now sending out. 

Were it not that the colored man of the South and 
the red man of the West and the youth of our own 
family, were being equipped to meet this struggle, the 
picture would be dark indeed. 



136 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



Cij-rrem.t 23Ia.^;per:Lir:ig^s 



EPIPHANY. 



On the 6th da}- of January, each year, thousands 
of people make a pilgrimage to the Jordan river for 
the epiphany ceremony. The celebration is given in 
honor of the visit of the Wise Men from the East, who 
came to pay obeisance to our Lord. The pilgrims 
bathe themselves in the sacred waters of the Jordan, 
not as a baptismal rite for the remission of sins, but 
merely to celebrate the above-named occasion. 

When circumstances or distance interfere with such 
a pilgrimage, arrangements are generally made by the 
devotes of the rite to have water brought from the 
Jordan to their place of worship. 

This year it was impossible for the Czar of Russia 
and the royal family to go to Palestine, so they cele- 
brated the feast of epiphany in their own Neva chapel. 
It has been their custom on such occasions to have a 
salute fired. This custom was observed at the Czar's 
recent feast, as usual, but to his surprise, simultane- 
ously with the report of the guns, came a rain of 
grapeshot through the imperial chapel which resulted 
in a very narrow escape for the royal devotes. Neither 
the damage done to the house, nor the narrow escape, 
affords so much anxiety to his Majesty as does the 
quandary, whether the affair was intentional or ac- 
cidental. An attempt has been made to explain that 
the day before was spent in target practice, and this 
gun was carelessly left loaded and with the other 
salute guns, was fired at the given signal. But it is 
hard to explain how it happened that this particular 
gun should be pointed in the immediate direction of the 
Czar's place of worship. 

* * * 

At St. Petersburg about twelve thousand ship build- 
ers recently ordered a strike. It is rather a serious 
matter with Russia just at this time that her ship- 
building industry should be at a standstill. 

♦ ♦ * 

Father Gopon, the leader of the rebellion in Rus- 
sia, is said to be marching through the country, to- 
ward the imperial palace, with a hundred thousand 
strong. An attempt is being made to suppress the 
movement by the government troops, and at many 
points vast numbers of men, women and children are 
mercilessly slaughtered ; sometimes as many as five 
hundred and once as high as five thousand. The 
internal conditions of Russia are something awful and 
it is hoped that the worst has been passed. 

^ ^ ^ 
Pittsburg, Pa., is to receive fifty million dollars 
with which to build an underground railroad svstem. 



Since the Minnesota Educational Exhibit won the 
prize at the World's Fair, a proposition is now on 
foot to send it to the Lewis-Clarke Exposition at Port- 
land, Oregon. 

.;. ♦ * 

The tangled finances of the Island of San Domingo 
have suddenly become a legislative and political issue 
in our country by the President causing a protocol to 
be signed, placing the revenues of the island under 
American control for a while. It seems that we have 
the time and the ability to attend to our own business, 
and at the same time be guardian for a lot of orphan 
children. 

♦> ♦ »> 

The cotton growers, from thirteen states and terri- 
tories, had an interesting session in New Orleans. By 
a unanimous vote they decided that wisdom dictates 
a reduction in acreage and the use of commercial 
fertilizer. Their president, Mr. Brittin, says that the 
depreciation in price in the present market is not due 
to speculation, but solely to over-production. 

* ♦ 4* 

The strikers in Russia demand the following : 

First, equal political rights for all classes ; Second, 

freedom from search by the police ; Third, freedom of 

religious faith ; Fourth, freedom of speech and press. 

* * 4> 

For years it has been somewhat of a scientific guess 
as to Mt. Everest being the highest peak in the world, 
but recent investigations by the British-Tibet Survey 
Mission have determined it as an absolute scientific 
fact that Mt. Everest, in the Himalayas, is the highest 
peak in the world. 

* * * 

Since the beginning of the construction of the Pan- 
ama canal, the canal commissioners have received ap- 
plications from nearly five thousand persons asking for 
employment. The majority of them, however, has 
been clerks, civil engineers and time-keepers. A very 
small per cent of the applications has been accom- 
panied with the pick or shovel. 

4>^* 4{» ^ 

The Great Northern Power company, of Duluth, 
Minnesota, has closed a contract for a dam across the 
St. Louis river rapids, for a canal and a power house 
all of which are for the utilizing of the wonderful pow- 
er nature has given to the place. They expect to gen- 
erate a hundred thousand horse power by the use of 
this great force of nature, and that eventually the 
railroads leading to the iron mines, will be operated 
by this power. 



THE I NGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



137 



The Illinois Legislature nia\- as well have been 
killed as scared to death. A sorry looking set was 
beheld when their criminal grafts were fearlessly ex- 
posed bv one of their number. They were sorry it 
was discovered. 

4> * * 

Henry Phipps, a wealth}- Pittsburg steel man, has 
set apart one million dollars for the erection of im- 
proved tenement houses in New York City. He wants 
the investment to clear four per cent after allowing the 
repairs, and this four per cent to be used in the con- 
struction of other tenement buildings. An organiza- 
tion will be formed to care for this work, and it will 
be done on a purely business basis so that the scheme 
will not be discouraging to those who want to try 
to build their own houses. 

* * * 

The United States Court, of Iowa, affirmed 
the anti-cigarette law, but we are sorry to say that the 
law does not reach far enough yet. 

* * ♦ 

The Medical Commission of the Harvard Univer- 
sity has at last reached a decision in the. investigation 
of the cancer problem, which has been under con- 
sideration for the past two years. They have decided 
that cancer is not infectious but is hereditary, and 
that the only hope of cure is an -early surgical treat- 
ment, or in some form of serum not yet discovered. 
Many deny this statement, however, and claim that 
epithelial cancers are readily removed without harm 
or danger. 

* * * 

Several people were killed and many more injured 
by the collision of three trains in the suburbs of Lon- 
don. The cause was due to a dense fog. 

* ♦ ♦ 

The American Locomotive - company, which em- 
braces all the important locomotive plants in the coun- 
try, except the Baldwin locomotive works at Phila- 
delphia, has added one more to their list by incorpo- 
rating the Rogers Locomotive works, Patterson, X.J. 

* * * 

The University of Berlin recently issued a year 
book, showing that its students outnumber those of 
any other institution of learning in the world. In- 
struction is given to 7,774 matriculated and 1,330 
non-matriculated students, 9,104 in all. One hundred 
twenty-three of this number are Americans. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

In the last ten years a decided increase in the at- 
tendance of colleges has been noticed, and it is claimed 
by college men that one hundred per cent has been 
made in the last decade for men and two hundred 
per cent for women. 



Fou the first time in ten years the city of Rome, 
Italy, has Ijeen visited by a snow-storm. 
* * * 

The quiet little lake of Loenvand, nestled among 
the fjords of Norway was suddenly awakened from 
its slumbers, last week, by the rush of an awful ava- 
lanche which plunged into her waters. The weight 
had become so immense as to cause the ice under- 
neath to melt and the great mountain of ice slipped 
into the lake. An immense wave was caused to sweep 
over the neighboring shores, and so far fifty-nine 
persons are known to have lost their lives. 
^ 4> 4> 

The government of Italy has passed a law abolish- 
ing slavery throughout their dominion in the East Af- 
rican colonies. This is one step towards progress. 

* * * 

Another combination is attracting the eye of the 
public. The Wells-Fargo Company Bank and the Ne- 
vada National Bank of San Francisco have consol- 
idated under the name of Wells-Fargo Nevada Bank, 
with an approximate asset of thirty millions. 

* ♦ * 

In a Santa Fe disaster, near Derby, Kans., one was 
killed and thirteen wounded. 

* + * 

Dr. Charles Hall, president of the faculty of the 
Union Theological Seminary of Chicago, has an- 
nounced the gift of $1,100,000, but declines to reveal 
the name of the donor. A certain portion of the do- 
nation is represented by thirty-six lots off Riverside 
drive, near Twenty-second street. A new seminary is- 
to be built on this ground in the next four years. 

* * * 

The builders of the great subway in the cit}' of 
Chicago are expecting a strike any moment among 
their laborers. 

<!► * * 

Out of the sevenb,- thousand school children, who 
have been previously reported to be suffering of hun- 
ger, in the city of Chicago, only two hundred ac- 
cepted the invitation to the free breakfast given, by the 
Salvation Army. The committees explain that their 
plans of feeding the hungry children have not as vet 
been properly brought before the public, but ere long 
they expect to make provisions so that it will not be 
necessary for even the outcast and poverty-stricken to- 
go to school hungry. 

♦ * * 

The total amount of exports from Great Britain 
for 1904 were $1,444,000,000; the total amoimt of ex- 
ports of the LTnited States for 1904 were $1,451,000.- 
000. 



138 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




When a woman has washed the dishes 

A thousand times and one, 
Sometimes that woman wishes 

Away from it all to run; 
She feels that she has been earning 

Cash for a little fun, 
And gaily she'll wash them on returning, 

A thousand times more, and one. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
RELAXATION FOR WOMEN. 



In this busy world of ours — or rather in these busy 
cities — rest is absolutely necessary for the society wom- 
an, the housewife or the woman of business, for all 
women are high strung and need to put on the brake 
once in a while or trouble invariably results. 

Any stranger visiting our shores is impressed with 
the extreme nervousness of our people, which is shown 
in the many attitudes which they assume within a 
short space of time and the difificulty with which they 
keep their hands still for more than a few minutes 
at a time. 

Indeed, it is not uncommon to hear women com- 
plain of being so tired out and so nervous that they 
simply must find something to do, being unable to sit 
still for any length of time. Such a state of affairs 
is deplorable, and bodes ill, not alone for the women 
concerned, but for the future generations as well. 

Rest is absolutely necessary to each human being; 
how else can we expect to be well-poised, clear headed 
and self-possessed? Extreme nervousness is akin to 
dementia, and the women of to-day must call a halt 
and put a stop to this pace that kills ere it is too late. 

It is advisable that every woman should rest each 
day for a short period. It is not necessary to sleep, 
but it is well to retire to one's own room, remove all 
tight clothing, don a lounging robe and lie down. Re- 
lax all the muscles ; let go, as it were, feel all the ten- 
sion under which you have been holding yourself 
slacken little by little, and shut out all care from your 
mirid. 

There are those who claim this cannot be done, they 
have so much on their minds, their burdens are so 
heavy, and so on. Dear woman, your burden is not 
so great but someone else has borne as heavy a burden 
before ; you are not alone in your trouble, and you 
can forget it if you will, for it is your duty to be su- 
perior to all outside influences. 

Learn to take rest in inactivity, and you will learn 
a health-giving secret, and you must learn this if you 
wish to be well. By lying down for even fifteen min- 



utes each day and relaxing (it is possible to lie down 
.and fret and worry quite as much as if standing up) 
much benefit will result, for this gives the tired, nerv- 
ous woman time to collect her wits, and appear fresh 
and in her right mind when evening comes and broth- 
ers, father or husband return from their daily la- 
bors. 

There are many little ways in which a woman may 
rest at other times. When waiting for a car at a 
station, it is wise to sit down squarely on a seat and 
calmly wait ; not on the edge of the seat, fidgeting un- 
til the car arrives. 

That is the way, and the only way, to overcome 
this nervous, fidgeting affliction that has taken pos- 
session of our women of late. — Health Culture. 
* ♦ ♦ 
THE POWER OF FORGIVENESS. 



The power of forgiveness even for an offense 
against human law is well illustrated in the following: 
A soldier was about to be brought before his com- 
manding officer for -some offense. He was an old of- 
fender, and had often been punished. " Here he is 
again," said the officer, on his name being mentioned ; 
" flogging, disgrace, solitary confinement, everything 
has been tried with him." Whereupon the sergeant 
stepped forward, and, apologizing for the liberty, said : 
" There is one thing which has never been done with 
him yet." 

" What is that ? " said the officer. 

" Well, sir," said the sergeant, " he has never been 
forgiven." 

" Forgiven ! " exclaimed the colonel, surprised at 
the suggestion. He reflected a few minutes, ordered 
the culprit brought in, and asked him what he had to 
say to the charge. 

" Nothing, sir," was the reply, " only that I am sor- 
ry for what I have done." 

Turning a kind and pitying look on the man, who 
expected nothing less than that his punishment would 
be increased with the repetition of his offense, the colo- 
nel addressed him, saying : " Well, we forgive you ! " 

The soldier was struck dumb with amazement ; tears 
started to his eyes, and he wept like a child. He was 
humbled to the dust, and, thanking his officer, he re- 
tired — to be the old refractory, incorrigible man ? No ! 
From that day forward he was a new man. He who 
told the story had him for years under his eye, and a 
better conducted man never wore a soldier's uniform. 
— Selected. 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



139 



THE FROG'S APPETITE. 



MOCK LEMON PIE. 



A frog's capacity for enveloping his comrades and 
assimilating them was once shown by an incident 
which occurred under the observation of one of my 
acquaintances. He had returned from the country 
with a lot of frogs, large and small, which he had ob- 
tained for one of the New York educational institu- 
tions. I have forgotten how many there were, but 
they numbered over twenty, I am quite certain. These 
he put into a large bird cage, the wires of which 
were close enough together to prevent even the small- 
est from escaping. On the third day he went to see 
how his captives were doing, and found, greatly to 
his surprise, that all had disappeared with the excep- 
tion of two old " mossbacks," and they were eyeing 
each other askance, apparently in doubt as to which 
would be the " last survivor of the whole ship's com- 
pany," as he expressed it. 

As an insect catcher the frog is quite expert, even 
such quick moving species as the dragon fly often fall- 
ing victim to its dexterity. Fishes also are often cap- 
tured, and good-sized ones, too, a fingerling trout 
having been found in the stomach of a frog which 
was not more than six inches in length. 

♦ * ♦ 

SMALL SAVINGS. 



Save time by putting things in their proper places, 
planning your work systematically and performing 
it in the quickest manner. 

Save strength by using modern conveniences, rest- 
ing when possible and leaving undone the unnecessary 
puttering. 

Save money by buying only what is needed, and 
that of the best quality that can be afforded. 

Save food by judiciously combining and using the 
left-over portions by care to avoid waste in cooking, 
and the thoughtful adaptation of various kinds to the 
needs of the consumers. 

Save vegetables by sorting out the cut and bruised 
ones and storing in a cool cellar, free from frost. 

Save apples by care in handling, watching to re- 
move those that show decayed spots and canning them 
if necessary. 

Save fuel by cooking several things at a time when 
a hot fire is kept for ironing or baking. — R. E. Merry- 
man. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

MOLASSES COOKIES. 



One egg, one cup sugar, one cup molasses, one cup 
butter or lard, butter preferred, any seasoning which 
is liked, one heaping teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 
one-third cup of boiling water. Make a soft dough, 
roll, and bake in a quick oven. 



Perhaps some of those people who do not like lemon 
pie would like this, try it, it is quickly and easily 
done, if in a hurry for a good dessert, but is best cold. 
Bake your crust the same as for lemon pie. Brown a 
piece of butter the size of a hickory nut in your skil- 
let, and then pour into it one and one-half pints of 
milk, two eggs, reserving the white of one for the frost- 
ing, two heaping tablespoons of cornstarch or flour 
may be used, one third cup of sugar, two teaspoons 
lemon extract and a pinch of salt. Beat the eggs, 
sugar, salt, extract and cornstarch thoroughly, add 
enough cold milk to make thin enough to pour into 
the scalding milk and mix as for gravy. Cook five 
minutes, pour into the crusts and frost and place in 
the oven long enough to brown nicely. Frosting 
should be thin and seasoned with lemon. This will 
make two pies if not wished too deep. 
♦J* ^ *♦♦ 
DRESSING. 



Four slices of stale bread soaked in three pints of 
milk until soft enough to mash, one tgg, a piece of 
butter the size of an Qgg, pepper and salt to taste, three 
medium onions chopped fine, and seasoned with sage 
too if liked. This is good just baked alone if some ham 
gravy or bits of cold fried pork such as is left over 
are used. It may be fried in butter if in a hurry. 

»^ ^ ^ 

CREAM COOKIES. 



One tgg, one cup sugar, a pinch of salt, a piece of 
butter the size of an tgg, nutmeg or any other season- 
ing which you like ; beat to a cream, then add one cup 
thick sour cream and mix but do not beat long enough 
for the cream to separate, one teaspoon of soda mixed 
with the flour, of which you use just enough to have 
a soft dough that you can roll out. Bake in a quick 
oven. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 



One &gg, two heaping tablespoons of sugar, a pinch 
of salt, one third cup of sour cream, two cups of but- 
termilk, one cup of white flour, two heaping cups of 
corn meal, mix thoroughly and bake in a quick oven. 
Excellent with honey or maple syrup. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
MOUTH WASH. 



. One part of Chloride of Hydrogen. 

Three parts Listerine. 

Five per cent oil of Wintergreen. 

Ihis is an excellent mouth wash and is uninjurious 
to the teeth, leaving them bright and clean. It also 
sweetens the breath. Shake, and drop one or two 
drops upon your brush when 3'ou clean your teeth. 



140 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



• ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦f M «»»»»»»( 



i: Reading Circle and Christian Workers' Topics 



By EIiIZABETK D. BOSENBEBQEB 

•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»»»»» M ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦• 



FREE SALVATION.— Rom. 10:13. 



For February 19, 1905. 



I. The Blessing. 

1. Salvation from the Guilt of Sin, Rom. 8:2 

2. Salvation from its Power, Rom. 6: 6 

3. Salvation from its Results Rom. 8: 23 

II. The Duty. 

1. To Call Upon God, Zech. 13:9; Acts 2:21 

2. To Call Through the Mediation of Christ, 
Heb. 9:24 

3. To Call by the Aid of the Spirit, Rom.' 8: 26 

4. To Call with a Disposition to be Saved, 
Matt. 14:30 

III. The Promise. 

1. To All Nations, Acts 2: 39 

2. To All Ranks, Acts 2: 39 

3. To All Conditions, Isa. 1 : 18 

4 To All Characters, .Acts 17: 30, 31 

Text. — For whosover shall call upon the name of the 
Lord shall be saved. Romans 10: 13. 

References.— Jude 3; John 3: 14-18; John 5:24; Matthew 
18:3; Revelations 7:9, 10; 1 John 4:9; 2 Peter 3:9; 1 
Peter 1:5; 1 Peter 1:9; Hebrews 7:25; Hebrews 2:3; 
Hebrews 1:14; Titus 2:11; 1 Thessalonians 5:9; Philip- 
pians 2: 12; Jeremiah 3:23; Isaiah 46; 12, 13; Psalm 91: 16. 

Whosoever. 

A MAN who lived for this world alone, was taken 
sick. One day when he was sitting alone in the house, 
he thought of his condition, and he said to himself, 
" What a fool I have been. My life is nearly gone, 
and I have lived without God and without hope." 
When his little boy came in, the father sent him for 
the Bible. The boy brought it and read some for him ; 
but when he came to the longer word " whosoever," 
he stumbled and said, " I can't read that. I don't know 
what it spells." 

" Why boy," said the father, " you should know that 
word for all may turn upon its meaning." 

So the child ran out and asked a man, who was 
passing, what it meant, while the father sat by the 
open window. " Why," said the man, " who-so-ever 
means anybody and everybody." The father said to 
himself, " Anybody and everybody ; that includes me," 
and then and there he asked Jesus to save him. 

But like the little boy, we do not know what it 
means. We say it over and over glibly enough, but 
to understand how Jesus saves us all, we will learn 
that only in heaven. 



" Whosoever cometh, need not delay; 
Now the door is open, enter while you may; 
Jesus is the true, the only Living Way, 
Whosoever will, may come." 

Our Need. 

What weak men want is victories, what men who 
have failed want is success. What men who have 
succumbed to some besetment want, is more manhood. 
What peevish, fretful people want is more patience. 
What discouraged boys and girls want is a new heart 
and hope. Can Jesus come into your life with just 
this element that is lacking? Believe it, young peo- 
ule, he will come to whosoever needs him and asks 
him. 

Without Salvation. 

The world without Christ and without salvation 
is a cruel, grasping, selfish, wretched world, no matter 
what its intellectual attainments or its material pos- 
sessions. When the Roman empire was at the height 
of its magnificence, it had at its disposal wealth, power, 
and intellect and from these it wrought senseless lux- 
ury and merciless despotism. Yet the world in the 
mass without Christ is not more wretched and lost 
than the heart that refuses to admit him. He offers 
us salvation, if we say " no " it is that we may choose 
something evil. If we bar the door of our heart 
against Jesus, it is that we may admit some other guest 
who will bring us not peace, but fear or perplexity; 
not joy, but trouble and it may be hatred. If the lost 
soul were a thousandth part as anxious to be saved 
as Jesus is to give salvation there would be no delay. 
How many more souls would be rejoicing in Christ 
Jesus to-day. 

Saved from Sin. 

That is the salvation we need. Moody describes it 
thus : " Down there in the dark alleys of one of our 
great cities is a poor drunkard. I think if you want 
to get near hell, you should go to a poor drunkard's 
home. Go to the house of that poor miserable drunk- 
ard. Is there anything more like hell on earth? See 
the want and distress that reigns there. But hark! 
A footstep is heard at the door and the children run 
and hide themselves. The patient wife waits to meet 
the man. He has been her torment. Many a time 
she has borne about the marks of his blows for weeks. 
Many a time that strong right hand has been brought 
down on her defenseless head. And now she waits 
expecting to hear his oath and suffer his brutal treat- 
ment. He comes in and says to her : ' I have been to 
the meeting ; and I heard there that if I will, I can be 



THE I NGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



141 



cnnvcrted. I bclic\c that God is able to save me." Go 
clown to that house again in a few weeks : and what a 
change! As you approach you hear some one sing- 
ing the good old hymn. Rock of Ages. The children 
are no longer afraid of the man but cluster around 
his knee; his wife is near him. .Ml are happy. Is not 
that a picture of salvation and regeneration? I can 
take you to many such homes, saved and made happy 
by the regenerating power of Jesus. He gives them 
strength to overcome temptation. He saves them 
from their sins. 

Free to the Heathen. 
This salvation is free to the heathen, and many 
of them are rejoicing to-da}' over sins forgiven. Oh, 
let us do all we can toward giving them the Gospel. 
When the first Moravian missionaries were leaving 
for Greenland, a minister said, " Give the natives sound 
divinity beginning with the being and attributes of 
God, following with the doctrine of sin, and thus lead 
on at last to Christ and the cross. This counsel was 
followed, and for years not a soul was saved. One day 
at a funeral a missionary out of the fulness of his 
sympathetic heart, told the story of Jesus' love and the 
cross. The natives listened eagerly, and welcomed this 
salvation. From that time on, many were saved. 

Topics for Discussion. 

1. Is Repentance necessary to salvation? Acts 3: 
19 ; Romans 2:4; 2 Cor. 7 : 10. 

2. In whose name are we saved? Acts 4: 12; He- 
brews 5 : 9. 

3. The second birth. John 3:3-12. 

4. Baptism. Acts 2 : 38. 

5. By grace- are ye saved. Romans 11:6. 

^ ^ *$•■ 
THE BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT. 



" We have Christian Workers' meetings, and use your 
programs. But we do not always know who is to lead, 
or what part we are to take in the work. Things go 
wrong sometimes. What should we do? " — A Sister. 

" Things go wrong sometimes," in any organization, 
but they should not go wrong all the time. We' be- 
lieve that the trouble in this meeting lies in the lack of 
system. Every Circle or Christian W'orkers' society 
shotild have good leaders. There should be two or 
three who are capable and willing, to look after the 
interests of the young people. These two or three 
should be elected a committee to get out the programs 
and supervise the work in general. You need other 
committees to do other work, but 3^ou want one to 
exercise general supervision over everything. If 3'our 
society has printed programs for the year, this com- 
mittee should see to it that every member of the So- 
ciety is given something to do. Those who can lead a 
meeting, should be appointed as leaders, others who are 
timid should only be asked to recite a verse of Scrip- 



ture ; let the singers, sing. If yuu have any members 
who are liked by everybody, who are interested in those 
about them, sociable, tactful, with a happy knack of 
addressing strangers, put two or three of these on 
a Lookout Committee. .\s memljcrs of this committee, 
it shall be their duty to ask people to join the Society, 
to see to it that all who come to the meetings are wel- 
comed and made to feel at home. 

Your ministers, and Sunday-school teachers can give 
a short talk, not five minutes in length, on some of 
these topics for discussion that are given with every 
program. 

Do not forget, to inform each one of their work on 
this program. There is much that we must learn, 
before our meetings will be successful. Help us to 
discuss ways and means each week. Give us some 
of your experiences. 

\\'e have never been so well pleased with the course 
laid down for Our JNIissionary Reading Circle, as we 
are with the one just otitlined. And the thoughtful 
reader of our church papers can trace in a very dis- 
tinct manner the influence of this reading upon our 
people, by personal testimony, larger collections and 
a greater zeal for missions. There was never a time 
when the qualit}- of missionary literature was so high 
and the quantity so great as at present. 

♦ *J> ♦ 

Sister Mary E. Miller, of Tiffin, Ohio, says, " I 
hope to send more names soon. In the Circle here, 
the members exchange their books, and so help each 
other. Some of us have read all the books so far, and 
how much we enjoy them ! They are so helpful. 
Long live the Circle, and may those who do not give 
to missions join it." 

♦ 

Brother George W. Fouch, of W'everton, Mar3dand, 
is interested and at work. He sa}-s, "' I send you two 
names with the hope that I can send more soon. 
This work is important, God bless those who seek to 
serve him." 

*j> ♦ ♦ 

NEW NAMES. 



2647. 
2648. 
2649. 
26S0. 
2651. 
2652. 
2653. 
2654. 
2655. 
2656. 
2657. 
2658. 
2659. 



Catharine R. Kline, Broadway, Va. 
J. S. Myers, Broadwaj', Va. 
Josie Myers. Broadwaj', \'z. 
Rilla S. Rimel. Broadway, ^'a. 
Ruby E. Rimel, Broadwa}', "\'a. 
Sadie E. Zigler, Broadway, Va. 
Lottie Spitzer, Broadway, ^'a. 
Sarah E. Zigler, Broadwaj'. Va. 
Dr. E. ^I. .\rnold. Cerrogordo, 111. 
Mrs. Susie Arnold. Cerrogordo, 111. 
Clark Heckman. Cerrogordo, 111. 
C. T. Kaetzel, Weverton, Md. 
Morse A. Younkins, Weverton. Md. 



Local Secretary. 

Bettie Root, Fredonia, Kans., Box 375. 



142 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



...iiii.^ OUR YOUNG PEOPLE flllli- 




THE GEOGRAPHY CLASS.— Chapter XIV. 



Belfast, Ireland. 
Dear Mr. Maxwell: — 

Although I never promised to write any when we left 
home, yet I promised to assist the boys and girls in their 
undertaking, and especially Marie, and therefore I un- 
dertake to fulfill her obligations as this is letter day 
with her. No doubt you are well aware that traveling is 
very hard on clothing, and as we have lately arrived in 
Belfast and are comfortably located, the girls thought 
they would seize this opportunity to do a lot of mend- 
ing for the party while the boys are out getting a su- 
perficial idea of the lay of the city. I thought it would . 
be no more than courtesy, under the circumstances, to 
write this letter for Marie. 

Instead of taking the most direct route from Dublin to 
Belfast as is generally taken by the globe trotter, we 
preferred to saunter across the Island in a zigzag fashion 
and that way be able to enter into the rural life of the 
people, which, after all, is the real way to study geog- 
raphy. I am trying to keep constantly before the minds 
of the class that we are studying geography. Roscoe 
and Oscar are doing some excellent work with their 
kodaks, and when we get home we expect to have a 
good time showing the pupils of the Mayville school 
some of their work. I think when we get the pictures 
finished and we get home I can talk better than I can 
write. But I want to send to you, in this letter, a de- 
scription of St. Patrick's purgatory. Ireland is surely a 
land of pilgrimages; there is hardly a large territory any 
where in the country without its hallowed spot to which, 
from time immemorial, pilgrims have thronged in search 
of help — spiritual and physical. 

The place of pilgrimage which, in the middle ages, was 
the most famous in all Europe is one of the most re- 
markable unto this day. In the northwest corner of 
Ireland, in the county of Donegal, there is little in- 
land lough called, "Lough Dearg" in the center of which 
are several islands. This lake is about twelve miles from 
the town of Donegal which is on the west coast of Ire- 
land, but strange to say the lake is on the east side 
of the height of land and its waters are drained by a 
small river and emptied into the sea near Londonderry 
near the northeast corner of Ireland. This little crystal 
lough is nestled among the wild uninhabited region in 
which are the bleak mountains and a large, dreary moor 
which entirely cuts it off from the civilized world. By 
the use of a vivid imagination you can easily see that 
the conditions would render this place the most ideal 
spot for seclusion, reflection, devotion and penitence. 

As would naturally be supposed, there hangs about this 
place a peculiar air of loneliness, desolation and melan- 
choly, which, of course, suits those who resort there for 
a brief sojourn to do penance. Comparatively speaking 
Lough Dearg is larger than the ordinary lough of Ire- 
land. It measures three or four miles each way. It 
contains several small islands; some of these islands are 
strikingly barren, treeless and shrubless. The stretches 



of moor and mountain that surround the lake are well 
covered with shrubs. One of these many islands differs 
from the rest in this, that it has many buildings upon it 
and seems covered quite to the water's edge; but upon 
landing one finds the interior to be particularly rough 
and stony. Strange to say, paths may be easily traced 
over these rough, stony ways that have been worn prac- 
tically smooth by the tread of barefooted pilgrims, who, 
for more than a thousand years, have walked the trying 
penitential rounds. 

Among the buildings on the island, two are chapels 
and several are hospices for the accommodation of pil- 
grims. This island is looked upon as being holy, and in 
fact is called Holy Island, but the common name for it 
is St. Patrick's purgatory. It derives its name and dis- 
tinction from the tradition that St. Patrick, when he was 
alive, more than fourteen hundred years ago, occasion- 
ally retired to a cave on this Island for prayer and 
penance. 

The successors of St. Patrick held his rendezvous in the 
most sacred reverence. In 1610 A. D. St. Dabheog built 
a monastery at this place. Of course, as we told you in 
a former letter, the Danes took the country at one time, 
and they destroyed the monastery. But it was rebuilt 
in the twelfth century by the Augustinians, and from that 
time till the seventeenth century, this famous place was 
under their charge. It was during their administration 
that the Island won extraordinary fame. It has been 
read about, written about, and lectured about until there 
is hardly a day in the season when pilgrims may not be 
found from Ireland, England, Scotland and even America 
and far-away Australia, and it has become the Mecca 
to the prince as well as the peasant. 

The pilgrimage season opens usually about the first of 
June and closes with August. The latter part of the 
season is the busiest one; many little boats crowded with 
pilgrims are seen leaving the Island and the echoes of 
sweet music die away on the bosom of the waters as 
they sing " Farewell to Lough Dearg." The aged prior 
stands on the edge of the cliff, overhanging the lough, 
and waves his last prayer and farewell as they go to take 
their place in the world again, which, for a time, they 
have learned to forget. 

It is the most democratic place imaginable. Rich and 
poor, high and low, educated and uneducated, miner and 
planter, tradesman or shepherd, may all be found rest- 
ing upon some elevated knoll side by side. The rich 
lady and beggar shat familiarly together. Some prel- 
ate from America might share a cup of black tea and 
an unbuttered oatmeal cake with some country cobbler. 

These statements seem as if they come from dream- 
land, and after all it does not lack much of that and 
yet these things have real existence. No formality, what- 
ever, characterized the intercourse of the people upon this 
remarkable Island. Their principal duties of penance are 
to watch, pray and fast. They generally have one meal 
a day for each of the three days. The meal consists of un- 
buttered bread and tea without milk; this meal is in- 
(Continued on Page 144.) 



THE INGLICNOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



143 



y--»--*--*--«--*--*--*--*--«>--*--*--*--*"*--*--*-'««--*'-*--««--*--»--*--«>'-*--*--*--««--^l 



X 



I 



What are the religions of Russia and Japan? 

The established religion of Russia is the Greek 
Catholic, officially called the Orthodox Catholic Faith. 
The Holy Synod, the governing body of the church, 
was established with the concurrence of the Russian 
clergy and the Patriarchs of Constantinople, Jerusa- 
lem, Antioch, and Alexandria. The Emperor is the 
head of the church. It differs from the Roman Catho- 
lic Church in denying the spiritual supremacy of the 
Pope, in permitting the study of the Scriptures in the 
vernacular tongue and the marriage of the clergy. 
The chief forms of religion in Japan are Shintoism, 
with twelve sects, and Buddhism, with twelve 
sects and thirty-two creeds. There is no state religion, 
and no state support. Absolute religious freedom is 
allowed by the Japanese Constitution, and there are 
over 1,000 preachers, churches and preaching stations 
of the Roman Catholic, Greek and Protestant 

churches. 

* 

What is the difiFerence in meaning between majority 
and plurality vote in an election? 

Plurality is the excess of the winner over the next 
L'ghest candidate, and the majority is his excess over 
the total combined vote of his competitors. 

♦ 

Please give a cure for frost bites. 

Rub the aiifected parts with pure oil of peppermint. 
Care should be taken to use only the pure oil, as the 
essence of peppermint will not have the desired efifect. 

Who was "The Pathfinder"? 

This was a popular name given to John C. Free- 
mont, in allusion to his success as an explorer. 

* 

Who is the Chief Justice of the United States Supreme 
Court, and of what state is he a resident? 

Melville W. Fuller, of Illinois. 

* 
How high is Bartholdi's statue in New York Harbor? 
151 feet in height and stands on a pedestal 155 feet 
high. 

What are the powers of Congress? 
Declare war, coin money, establish post offices, rural 
routes, borrow money, and levy and collect taxes. 

To whom shall I apply for free government seeds and 
plants? 

To your Congressman. 



Will you please explain what linen is made of? 

Linen is cloth woven out of flax threads. In old 
times thread was spun by women on spinning wheels 
turned by hand, but now it is mostly made by machines. 
For the finest kinds of cambrics and for laces, how- 
ever, the threads are still made by hand. Linen cloths, 
too, were once made by hand, but they are now woven 
almost wholly by machinery. The chief kinds of cloth 
made are lawn, cambric, damask, diaper, sheeting and 
toweling. The best linens are made in France, Bel- 
gium, Holland and Great Britain. Most of the linen 
used in the LTnited States is brought from Europe. 
The word linen is derived from the Latin — linium — 
flax. 

♦ 

When did the ground that Washington stands on be- 
come the property of the United States, and how, and 
to whom did it belong before? 

The District of Columbia was formerly a part of 
Maryland, and contained about 64 square miles. Mary- 
land ceded this to the United States Dec. 23, 1788, 
as the seat of government. Virginia also ceded 36 
square miles, but this was given back July 9, 1846. 
The land originally accepted by the Government be- 
longed to nineteen individuals, who agreed upon terms 
of sale. The lots for public buildings were paid for 
at the rate or $125 per acre. The streets were given 
free. The other lots were the joint property of the 
owners and the public trustees. 



Are " Uncle Tom's Cabin," " Black Beauty," etc., con- 
sidered novels? 

Yes. A novel is fiction founded upon facts. Prob- 
ably Uncle Tom as a person never lived, but the char- 
acteristics that are portrayed by Mrs. Stowe actually 
existed over and over a thousand times, at the time 
when the novel was written. Black Beauty is the 
autobiography of a horse; not that the horse ever 
talked, but that the author of the book has succeeded 
in putting herself in the stead of the horse to the extent 
that their morals are almost personified. Don't be 
afraid to read either of these two books, or any other 
novels of this high class. 



In what year did John Brown hold the fort at Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia? 

John Brown seized Harper's Ferry Oct. 16, 1859. 

* 

In what year was Charley Ross kidnapped? 

July I, 1847, from his home in Philadelphia. 



144 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 7, 1905. 



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THE GEOGRAPHY CLASS.— Chapter XIV. 



(Continued from Page 142.) 
variably taken before noon. Smoking is allowed, and one 
may drink all the water he chooses. It is believed by the 
pilgrims that the waters of the lake have a peculiar nu- 
tritious effect; they boil it, sweeten it, and drink it in 
large quantities. From the time they enter the Island 
until they leave they are bareheaded and barefooted. 

In going from one prayer station to another the pil- 
grims often stop and kneel on the stones and pray. 
Sometimes these prayers are informal and other times 
certain prayers have to be said while encircling certain 
chapels; sometimes they go to the edge of the water 
and pray, then retreat a few steps and kneel and pray. 
Some pilgrims are able to make this round of stations 
in an hour while it takes others two hours. But this must 
be performed once each day of the three days' sojourn. 
In the evening of the first day each pilgrim has to go to 
prison, which means that they are to watch all night 
in the chapel and pray till morning. Formerly, of course, 
they used St. Patrick's cave, but nowadays the chapel 
is substituted for that. 

An old man by the name of Gallagher holds the office 
of prayer leader, whose duty it is to remain all night and 
lead them in prayer; they often have very fine singing 
during the night. There are only a few seats in this 
old church and the pilgrims are compelled to stand or 
kneel during the night. The three days' pilgrimage upon 
the Island tests the power of endurance of the devotes; 
however, they are seen rising at four o'clock in the morn- 
ing and hopping over the rocks from their lodging places 
to the chapel tO' say mass. It is remarkably strange that, 
in spite of the severity of this pilgrimage, none are ever 
known to suffer evil effects from it. That climate affords 
downpours of rain occasionally and yet no bad colds or 
sickness is experienced from it. It is a remarkably 
healthful spot, and this, together with the wonderful faith 
of the pilgrims and the intensity of their devotion, leads ■ 
to spiritual exaltation, which, no doubt, drives away all 
sense of physical discomfort. It is a delightful scene to 
see boatloads of pilgrims leaving the Island, waving 
handkerchiefs and hats as a last farewell to the sacred 
spot, and from the depths of their hearts they join in 
this simple song: 

"Oh! fare ye well, Lough Dearg, 

Shall I ever see you more? 
My heart is filled with sorrow 

To leave your sainted shore. 
Until life's days is passed away 

With pleasure shall I dwell 
On the happy days I spent with you — 

Lough Dearg, fare ye well." 

Hope Marie may be able to write the next letter her- 
self. Yours truly, 

Gertrude Merritt. 
(To be continued.) 



WHY? 

Why do we always talk of putting on our coats and 
vests, when we always put on first our vest and then 
our coat? 

Why do we refer to the coverings of our feet as 
shoes and stockings when the stocks are first put on? 

Why do we invite people to wipe their feet, when 
we mean their shoes? 

Why in the olden times did a father tell his son 
he would warm his jacket when everyone knew he 
meant his pantaloons? — Globe-Democrat. 

♦> ■♦ ♦ 

AN OBJECT LESSON. 



-A. FATHER told his son to set up some bricks on 
their ends in a line a short distance apart. " Now," 
said the father, " knock down the first brick." The 
boy obeyed. The fall of that brick made all the others 
fall too. The father then said, " Raise the last brick, 
and see if the others will rise with it." They would 
not. Once down, they must be raised singly. The 
father now said, " I have given you this object-lesson 
to teach you how easy it is for one to lead others astray, 
but how difficult for him to restore them." 

* <!• * 

Mr. Henry Phipps, the wealthy Pittsburg steel 
man, has announced that he intends using $1,000,000 
of his accumulation for the erection of improved tene- 
ments in New York City. It is his purpose to have 
each house surrounded by a vacant space or play- 
ground for the benefit of the children. The buildings 
must be fireproof and thoroughly sanitary, light and 
well ventilated. A regular corporation will be formed 
to carry out his ideas, and prominent city officials and 
reformers will be requested to take part in its organi- 
zation. 

* * * 

It is reported that in New York plans for the ex- 
penditure of $100,000,000 of the city's money are on 
foot to construct a tunnel to the Esopus river, capable 
of bringing 400,000,000 gallons of water to this city 
daily. The great tube, which is proposed to stretch 
to the Catskill watershed, will be capable of draining 
1,100 square miles. Plans also propose the building 
of a large city filtration plant and the construction of 
two emergency reservoirs, the latter to cost $4,000,000. 



Good Land Cheap 



Let us sell you farming land where the soil is pro- 
ductive and the crops dependable ; where we have no 
drouths or failures; where grasshoppers are not; where 
we have few storms and no destructive winds; where 
products are greatly diversified; where the markets are 
as good as they are easily reached; where the climate 
is uniform and salubrious; where you will be cordially 
welcomed and helped along. We state without fear of 
contradiction that we have the best land at the least 
money, possessing more advantages and fewer draw- 
backs, than can be found in this country to-day. A few 
years' time is all that is necessary to prove that we are 
in one of the most productive areas for fruit, root crops 
and live stock. The possibilities are here, largely un- 
developed as yet; all that we want is the people. Those 
we are getting are the right kind, your own kind, and 
the country will soon be dotted with green fields and 
cosy homes. Don't get the idea that you are going to a 
wilderness; not at all; on the contrary, we have sold 
lands in our BRETHREN COLONY to over 120 fam- 
ilies, nearly half of whom are already on the ground, 
In the vicinity of BRETHREN, MICHIGAN, we have 
thousands of acres of productive soil, splendidly adapted for fruit, root and vegetable 
crops and live stock, at prices from $7 per acre upwards, on easy terms. Our lands are 
sold to actual settlers. 




The basis of my business is absolute and 
unvarying integrity. 

SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Founder of the Brethren Colony, Brethren, Mich, 



others coming next spring. 



BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, BRETHREN, MICH., 

is Resident Agent in charge of the work at our Brethren Colony. It will only cost you a 
postal card to drop him a line for our illustrated booklet, entitled " The Brethren Colony 
in the Fruit Belt of Michigan." This will give you an accurate idea of the lands and all 
conditions surrounding them The booklet contains letters giving the opinion of many 
Brethren in regard to our lands and work. Every statement can be borne out by facts. 

Reduced rates will be furnished homeseekers desiring to look our country over and 
every opportunity will be accorded them to conduct their investigations satisfactorily 
by Bro. Miller on their arrival at Brethren, Michigan. 

For booklet, information as to rates and all details address: 



I 



SAMUEL S. THORPE, 
Cadillac, Mich., 

DISTRICT AGENT 

T^±clcx±sBna. 



or 



XjCLZxca. 



BRO. JOHN A. MILLER, 
Brethren, Mich., 

RESIDENT AGENT 



How Troubles IVIultiply 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»» 



From little stomach irregularities — constipation, etc., a host of 
ailments come. The system becomes clogged — impurities multiply. 
To expel these impurities is an easy matter by using 

Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer 

It is not a violent cathartic, but a gentle regulator of the 
bowels and strengthener of the digestive organs. At the same 
time it purifies the blood and gives tone and vigor to the entire 
system. 

DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER is a 100-year-old Swiss- 
German remedy — the discovery of a wise German physician of the 
olden times. Pure roots and herbs, and nothing else. 



A MOTHER'S REQUEST. 

Mondovi, Wis., Aug. Sth. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — My mother requests me to write you a few 
lines and thank you for what the Blood Vitalizer has 
done for her. She says she cannot praise it enough. No 
medicine has ever had such an effect on her as your medi- 
cine. She was suffering with stomach trouble and could 
hardly eat anything. Now she is perfectly well and can , 
eat and drink what she pleases. Her trouble has disap- 
peared completely. She says she will recommend it to 
everybody as long as she lives. Yours very truly, 



WAS SICK FOR 25 YEARS. 

Blountsville, Ala., Sept. ISth. 
Dr. P. Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — Your medicine, the Blood Vitalizer, has done 
my wife more good than all the doctors and medicines 
we have had for 25 years. She says she is now entirely 
well through the use of your medicine. You have our 
sincere thanks for what it has done. I can cheerfully 
recommend it to suffering humanity. You may use this 
letter to point the way to health for other sufferers. 

Yours truly, 



Johanna Anibas. i G. W. McDade. 

DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER is not a patent nor a drug 
store medicine. It is put up, not as an article of general traffic 
for the benefit of jobbers and dealers, but for sick people. It can 
be obtained of authorized agents or direct from the maker, 

DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 

112-114 South Hoyne Ave. CHICAGO, ILL. 



the: ingi_e:nook. 



44 ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦< ♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦» 



ii PIANOS, ORGANS AND SEWING MACHINES ON FREE TRIAl!!|:: 

ELEGANT CENTURY UPRIGHT PIANO, S12S. Warxantsa 25 years ; Bent on free tiial. • ' 

ELEGANT PARLOR ORGANS, $25 UP. Warranted 25 years ; aent oa free triaL :;: 

ELEGANT CENTURY SEWING MACHINES, BALL-BEARING, $13. WarrantedZSyean; - 

■est on freetxiaL CASH OR EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS. ^ 




We Irast 
honest 

U people 
located In 
g^0 an parts ol 
HC (he world. 

II. 




Direct Irom "N 
factory to _p| 
homes at ^^m 
iaclory 
prices. 







WRITE FOR FREE CATALOGUE. 

CENTURY MF'G CO. bep^t 324, E,st St. Louis, III. | 

♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»t»»»»»*»t ♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦t»»*«» M f»» 




CASH OR CREDIT 

1 ELEGANT CENTURY STEEL RANGES 1 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»»»»»»»-»-f*4»*»* M »»» M *»»»»»»t» 

OR 



With large reservoirs, from $8.00 up. Warranted 

fcr 25 years. Cash or easy monthly payments. 
. We trust honest people located in all parts of 
■ the world. Write for FREE catalogue. 

CENTURY MANUFACTURING CO., 
[ Department 325. East St. Louis. III. 

♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t»*»»»»»» ■»"»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■ 




BuilinOton 




The Big Horn Basin 

is an opportunity 
of to=day 

The man who is wise will investigate it while land 
is cheap and opportunities for investment are numerous. 
He will begin by sending for our descriptive folder 
(twenty-four pages, illustrated), which is mailed free to 
any address, and which gives a reliable, comprehensive 
report of the conditions there, and the prospects of 
future advancement. 



L 



A postal card request will bring a copy, 

(I. FRANCIS, General Passenger Agent, 
209 Adams St., Chicago. 



Now is the time to renew your subscription for the INGLENOOK. If 
you have not already done so, hand your subscription to one of our regular 
appointed agents. If it is not convenient for you to do this send your sub- 
scription direct to us. 



"COLLAR BUTTON" 

Plain; just what you hnvo l)eoii looking for. 
You will bii (l(illj;lited. .Suniplu, 10 cents; 
three for 25 cents. GEO. B. HOLSINGER, 
Brldt^owutor, Vii. 3t8 



500 Agents Wanted 

Tp Sell Books. Good Books; 
Good Commissions. Write at 
once for particulars. Address, 



BBETHBEN FUBI^ISHina HOUSE, 
Slgln, nilnois. 



FURfP^G 




.02 




WRITE 
TO • DAY 



lor our big 
free furni- 
ture catalog- 
It represents 
the largest 
and most 
complete assort- 
ment In the world of 
ri\EMA»KMU- 
MTVUEforparlor, 
dining rooni^ bed 
room. library, hall, veranda, 
kitchen, store, office or any part 
of ahouFe. We sell furniture in 
single pieces at same prices deal- 
ers pay for (furniture in wholesale 
quantities. We sell 
Library TablcHatS3*80 up 

lEookcases at 4.75 up 

l^re^sers at 4.95 up 

Chiffoniers at 3.80 up 

Iron Beds at 2.05 up 

^Idoboardg at 9.75 up 

8- — S Wood Kockersat .75 up 
11 Parior Suites, at 8.70up 
g and every style and kind of re- 
B liable furniture at correspond- 
ingly low prices. From this 
catalog you can select any article of fur- 
niture with best judgment and greatest 
ecrnomy. WE FURNISH HOMES 
COMPLETE at factory prices with 
furniture, carpets, curtains, 
BtoTee, tableware, and every- 
thing needed to furnish and 
adorn a home from top to bot- 
tom. Write to-day stating 
goods wanted and we will send 
a cat-alog oi the goods desired by 
return mail, fref with postage 
paid. Address 

EQUITY MFG. CO. 

CH I CAGO, I LU 




f' 



F&iMMmKmsim _.„_ 



IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
NOOK. 



EARN YOUR SUBSCRIPTION. 



For only four new subscriptions to the INGLFNOOK at $1.00 each we will 
forward your time on the paper for one year. 

For only five new subscribers at $1.00 each we will forward your time on 
the INGLFNOOK for one year, and send you the FARMERS VOICF for one year. 

How Many Want to Earn their Subscription? 

YOU WILL FIND IT AN EASY TASK. 

Sample Copies Free. -^#^ TRY IT ONCE. 

Brethren Publishing: House, Elgin, Illinois. 



THE QOSPEL MESSENGER FOR 
MISSIONARY PURPOSES. 

The General Missionary and Tract Committee have a plan to use the GOSPEL/ 
MESSENGER as a missionary in a very effective way. They propose to help pay for 
10,000 SUBSCRIPTIONS outside the Brethren Church. 

THE PLAN. 

The plan for securing these 10,000 names is to allow any one not a member of the 
Brethren Church, and not living in a family where there are members, to have 
the Gospel Messenger from now until Jan. 1, 1906, for only 50 cents. 

Or anyone interested in this plan of doing mission work may donate the paper to those 
not members and not living in families where there are members for only 50 cents 
for the year. 

This 50 cents does not by any means pay the first cost of the paper, but the General 
Missionary Committee have so great faith in the Messenger as a missionary factor that 
they are willing to expend considerable money on making up the deficiency in order to 
have the paper read by those not members of our fraternity. 

Send your order at once and the names will go on our list without delay. Cash must 
accompany each order. Always mention the fact that your order complies with the rules 
governing such subscriptions. Remember it is only 50 cents. 

Address BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



rr 11 Y^ k r% r^ r^ r^ y\ C ♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

1,11 I ^ IJL r^ I II II II 1^^ Many persons deceive themselves with the Idea that they -< . 

%F Ji- Jl^ *— ^^ M.K \J V-^ V-^ JL^ ^^ are practlQlng economy by purchaslns cheap gootlB. Suoh '; 

a method of economy defeats the very purpose for which 
It Is designed. Gobds Inferior In quality are never satisfactory. They are not durable, they disappoint the pur- 
chaser and reflect discredit upon the Arm that puts them out. 

Don't bo deceived by the " wonderful bargains " and " prices below cost " advertisements you frequently see. If 
you are a wise buyer you know you are being offered a shoddy grade of goods. 

We do not handle an Inferior quality of merchandise. Our goods ore low in price, but not cheap In quality. 
We have established a reputation for doing business on the Oolden Rule plan. We realize that every article we send 
out Is an advertisement of our business and creates an influence either for or against us. Therefore we must han- 
dle the best quality of goods If we would maintain our present high standard and secure the confidence of the 
public. 

Remember, our prices are the lowest that can be made on the quality of goods offered. We do not want your 
patronage unless we can give you honest returns for your money. "A square deal for everybody" is our first con- 
sideration. On that basis we solicit your trade. 



■■♦♦♦♦ ♦»♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦M-» ': 



This is a Bargain at $1.25 

If " A penny saved Is a penny 
earned," then why do you pay out 
hard-earned dollars for repair work 
you could do yourself if you had the 
necessary tools? With our Home 
Repairing Outfit you can save many 
dollars every year by repairing your 
boots, shoes, harness, tinware, etc. 
The complete outfit is packed in a 
strong, neat box which contains 40 
articles as follows; 




HOME ; : 
REPAIRING OUTFIT H^ 

Shoe, Harness and Iinv/areKepairi 



1 Iron Last for men's work. 

1 Iron Last for boys' work. 

1 Iron Last for women's work. 

1 Iron Last for children's work. 

1 Iron Stand for lasts. 

1 Shoe Hammer. 

1 Shoe Knife. 

1 Peg Awl handle. 

1 Peg Awl. 

1 Wrench for peg awl handle. 

1 Sewing Awl and Handle. 

1 Stabbing Awl and Handle. 

1 bottle Leather Cement. 

1 bottle Rubber Cement. 

1 bunch Bristles. 

1 tiall Shoe Thread. 

1 ball Shoe Wax. 

1 package Clinch Nails, % inch. 

1 package Clinch Nails, % inch. 

1 package Clinch Nails, % inch. 

1 package Heel Nails. 

4 pairs of Heel Plates, assorted sizes. 

4 Harness Needles. 

1 Harness and Saw Clamp. 

1 box Slotted Rivets, assorted sizes. 

1 Rivet Holder for same. 

1 Harness and Belt Punch. 

1 Soldering Iron ready for use. 

1 Handle for same. 

1 Bar Solder. 

1 box Resin. 

1 copy Directions for Half-Sollng, 

etc. 
1 copy Directions for Soldering. 



Quilt Patches 

We are sure we have a bargain 
that win delight all ladles who read 
our Inglenook advertisements. We 
have on hand large quantities of 
Bright, Handsome, All-Wool and 
Pretty Colored Patches, many cut 
from kersey cloth and nearly all 
good size. Thejr are especially valu- 
able for making up comforts and 
quilts and many other uses which 
will suggest themselves to any wom- 
an who likes needle work. Many 
Sisters' Aid Societies in country dis- 
tricts have had difficulty getting the 
right assortment to put Into . com- 
forts, quilts, etc. We can help you 
out. The price is 20 cents per 
pound, and a large number of 
patches. We can make immediate 
shipments. Send a trial order at 
once. 



Suit Case 




Here's a Dress-Suit Case that 
you'll be proud to carry — one that 
■will wear well and look well -when a 
cheap case will be shabby or wear 
out. There's not a cheap feature 
about this case, except the price. 
Covered with excellent mauve rub- 
ber cloth, solid steel frame, ends se- 
curely sewed and riveted, double 
leather, corners solid leather. Case 
is fitted with brass spring lock, brass 
cdtches, is lined with a good grade 
of cloth and has strap in body of 
case. Length, 20 Inches. 
Our price, only $1.50 



A Bigh Grade Iron Bed for $2.2S :; 

The Iron Bed has become popular 
and for real reasons. It Is strong, 
graceful, more sanitary and cheaper 
than the wooden ones. Here is an 
Iron Bed that Is generally sold at 
twice what we ask for It. By con- 
tracting for large quantities we have 
reduced the price to a minimum. 
The simplicity and elegance in bed- 




room furniture which now is uni- 
versally sought finds complete ex- 
pression In this bed. The material 
used is of good quality. It is 48 
Inches high at the head and 41, 
Inches at the foot. Sizes, 3 feet, 6 
Inches; 4 feet and 4 feet, 6 inches. 
Can be had In olive, white, nile or 
pink. Always give color when or- 
dering. 

The Spirit of Simplicity J 

Finds expression In our offerings 
of bedroom furniture. The feature 
of hand-wrought construction, 
brought Into harmony with sim- 
plicity of outline creates an influ- 
ence for refinement and simple taste. 
The Bureaus of generous length, the 
Chiffonier of drawers for storage, 
and the low Twin Beds — are pieces 
that conform in perfect detail. Our 
prices are always the lowest consist- 
ent with values. 



ALBAUGH BROS., DOVER & CO., 



! 341-343 Franklin Si. 



Chicago, III. 



Price, complete, per set. 



$1.25 



"THAT'S THE PLACE." 



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Art Picture 




Here is Your 

Opportunity 

to Get a 

Fine Lot of 

Pictures 

CHEAP 




No. 2079.— The Guardian Angel. 



ARE HIGHLY PLEASED. 

The.' e pictures are all colored and are exceedingly fine. 
They would be an ornament to any home. They are very 
suggestive and all who see them are highly pleased. 

THOUSANDS SOLD, 

■ In the past two or three weeks we have sold more than 
2;000 of them. These pictures sold last year for 25 cents 
each. 

OUR SPECIAL PRICE. 

We have secured a large number of these pictures and 
are therefore able to give our patrons a very low price 
an them. 

Size of Pictures, 16 by 20 inches. 
: For One or more, and less than Six, IS cents each. 

Half-dozen 75 cents. 

One dozen or more, $1.32 per dozen. 

Order by Number. 

i We can furnish you with any of the following subjects: 

No. 24 Pharaoh's Horses. 

No. 25 Can't You Talk? 



No. 850. — Simply to Thy Cross I Cli 



No. 278 , Rock of Ages 

No. 2079 The Guardian Angel 

No. 850 Simply to Thy Cross I Cling 

No. 2366 The Lord's Supper 

No. 41.... The Lord's Prayer and Ten Commandments 

No. 43 The Crucifixion 

No. 45 Soul's Awakening 

No. 47 .Madonna and Child 

No. 78 Evening 

No. 27 Defiance 

No. 52 Theodore Roosevelt 

No. n Nature's Beauties 

No. 742 Spring 

No. 748... Breakfast Time 

No. 4002 Assorted Fruits 

No. 750 Flowers and Fruit 

No. 734 .' .The Old Mill 

No. 752 Summer in the Far West 



**J^^''J**}^**'J"J^*^*^*4*^*^^4^ 



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FREE.— Our Large Illustrated Circu- ;| 
lar of these 20 Subjects Sent Free!! 



-A. x> x> xt. x: s s 



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E!1L.C3H3>3", I3L.3L,I3>JOIJS. 




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'J' *J* 'J' 'J* 'J* 'J* 'J* 'J* * J' 'J' 'J* ^* •'J' *{' *J* 'J* 'J* *J* 'J* 'J* *J* 'j' • Ji 'J' 'J* 'J* 'J* •}• *}• *J* *J* *J» ^ *j^ fp 'J* •{• 'J* lip 'J' tJ* •}* •J* 'J* 'J* %.' *v *♦* v"V I 

PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



:.-s2 vf* 



POEM. 

THE PATH OF THE MOON. 

THERE'S A DEAR LITTLE GIRL COMING HOME 
NIGHT. 



TO- 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 

ST. VALENTINE'S DAY.— By Adelaide McKee Koons. 
A FEW WHYS.— By Adah Baker. 
THE NOBLE PRIZES.— By A. W. Vaniman. 
PLEASANT STORIES OF PLEASANT PEOPLE.— By Mar- 
guerite Bixler. 
WHAT DO YOU READ?— By Lottie M. Bollinger. 
NATURE AND HER GOD.— By Mary I. Senseman. 
ECONOMY.— By Nancy D. Underbill. 
TED.— By Kathren Royer. 
HOUSEHOLD HINTS.— By O. A. McGrew. 

EDITORIALS. 

HABIT. 
A MISTAKE. 



LUCK AND PLUCK. 
VALENTINES. 



•f ♦ 






*^ 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'J' '. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ff»»*t»**»»t»»f» 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



February 1 4, 1 905 



$ 1 .00 per Year 



Nunnber 7, Volume^VII 



THE fNGLENOOK. 



30,000 ACRES 



IRRIGATED 



Government Land 

In Nevada 

^^OW OPEN FOR 

HOMESTEAD 



UNDER THE NEW 

IRRIGATION LAW 

The United States Qovern- 
nent Constructs the Canals, 
Reservoirs and Lateral Ditch- 
er t* the Land, and Maintains 
them for lo Year* at a cost of 

ONLY $2.50 AN ACRE 



TMs Include* Water. After i* Yews Water 
aad Caaal* Beleac t» H nmuf w l er. 



ONE-WAV COLONIST'S RATES 

To pacific Coast Every Day, March 
I to May 15. 

From Chicago, $33 00 

From St . Louis, 30 00 

From Missouri River, 25 00 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 



Stop Off at Reno, Nevada, 

And investigate the irrigated Govern- 
ment land. Call on Mr. H. B. Maxson, 
U. S. Engineer, for information. 



Printed Hatter FREE. Write to 

QEO. L. McDONAUGH, 

COLONIZATION AGENT 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Omaha, Neb. 



...THE... 

Union Pacific Railroad 

In Connection With 

San Pdro, Les Angeles & Salt 
Lake Railroad 

EXPECT TO BE RUNNING 
THROUGH TRAINS BETWEEN 
CHICAGO AND LOS ANGELES 
VIA SALT LAKE CITY EARLY 
NEXT SPRING. 



ONE-WAY COLONIST'S RATES 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, March 
I to May 15. 

From Chicago, §33 00 

From St. Louis, 30 00 

From Missouri River 25 00 

Proportionate rates from all points 
East. 

There are opportunities in Southern 
Utah and Nevada where homes can 
be had at little expense, where no 
heavy clothing and but little fuel is 
needed, where garden truck can be 
raised in abundance nearly the whole 
year, and where the people can live 
in tents throughout the year without 
suffering from heat or cold. The new 
line of the Salt Lake Route, now 
building through to California, will 
pass through several well watered 
valleys in these states, in which can 
be grown apples, grain, potatoes, figs, 
cotton, sugar cane, tobacco, peanuts 
and many of the semi-tropical fruits. 
These valleys are surrounded by hills 
and lofty snow-capped mountains, 
which furnish an inspiring back- 
ground to the scene which greets 
the traveler who finds his way into 
the favored region. The climate is 
mild and delightful, and excessive 
heat and extreme cold is unknown. 
This is a good place for a poor man 
to get a home, the sick to find health 
and the capitalist to make good in- 
vestments. 

If you are interested in mining, 
manufacturing or agriculture, or seek- 
ing a new home in a new land, and 
desire to know more about the great 
resources of Utah, Nevada and Cali- 
fornia, write to Geo. L. McDonaugb, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Neb. 

And then stop off at CALIENTES 
and LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, to in- 
vestigate for yourself. Be sure to buy 
your ticket over 

The Union Pacific Railroad 

known as the "OVERLAND ROUTE," 
and is the only direct line from 
Chicago and the Missouri River to 
all principal points West. Business 
men and others can save many 
hours via this line. 

E. L. LOMAX. G. P. * T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraaka. 



CHEAP RATES 

(To Sterling, Colorado,) 

South 
Platte 
Valley 

AND RETURN 



First and Third Tuesday 
IFebruary and March 

From Chicago, $20.00 

From Peoria $18.00 

From St. Louis $15.00 

From Missouri River, $15.(X) 

Proportionate rates from all points 

East. 

Where you will see thousands of 
stacks of hay, thousands of fat cattle, 
thousands of fat sheep, thousands of 
acres of irrigated land that can be 
bought at from $25.00 to $45.00 per 
acre. 

Only 24 hours' run to Chicago; only 
12 hours' run to the Missouri River; 
only 4 hours' run to Denver. The on- 
ly country that can make a good 
showing to the homeseeker in mid- 
winter. Go and see for yourself — it 
need only take four or five days' tim* 
and you will be well repaid by what 
you see. Buy your ticket over 

The Union Pacific 
Railroad 

Which is known as "The Over- 
land Route." and is the only direct 
line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West 
Business men and others can saTC 
many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal to your nearest ticket 
agent, or GEO. L. McDONAUGH, 
Colonization Agent, Omaha, Nebr. 

E. L. LOMAX. G. P. ft T. A., 
Omaha, Nebr. 



p 



the: inglenook. 



A BOOK 

OF SURPASSING INTEREST 



NOW READY 



" Bridgewater College 



Its Past and Present." 



Editorial StafF: 

John Walter Wayland, Editor-in Chief. 
J. Carson Miller P. B. Fitzwater 

Effie Showalter Long Weldon T. Myers 

I. N. H. Beahm Edward Frantz 

E. M. Crouch Justus H. Cline 

John S. Flory D. Newton Eller 

Jacob A, Garber, Business Manager. 

This book is a complete history of the College, pre- 
pared by the Alumni Association as a tribute to the Alma 
Mater, and as a means of renewing old friendships and 
aiding poor students. 

16 Chapters 

Tell of the Founding and Growth of the School, Re- 
ligious Life, Missionary Activity, Co-education, Athletics, 
Literary Societies, Literary Publications, Etc. A full 
chapter is devoted specially to Benefactors of the Col- 
lege; another to the Graduating Classes; another to the 
Teachers; another to Prominent Alumni, not graduates; 
Etc., Etc. 

Every Teacher, 

Every Graduate, 
Every Student, 

Is named in the Book. The Teachers and Graduates all 
have biographical sketches devoted to them; many of the 
students not graduates are noticed in the same way. 
Every student will find his name, former address, pres- 
ent address (in most cases), date of his sessions at Col- 
lege, etc. Marriage names of lady students have been re- 
corded as far as obtainable. 

140 Illustrations 

Show the College Buildings, the Town, Burning of 
Old Brick Building, College Library, Etc., and over 100 
Familiar Faces. 

Of Special Interest 

Are the biographical sketches, with portraits in most 
instances, of Daniel C. Flory, Walter B. Yount, G. B. 
Holsinger, Mrs. Holsinger, S. N. McCann, John B. 
Wrightsman, I. N. H. Beahm, E. M. Crouch, Edward 
Frantz, C. E. Arnold, Martha Click Senger, C. Tempie 
Sauble, Jesse E. Ralston, J. S. Geiser, Eld. Samuel Driver, 
Eld. Henry Garst, Eld. Daniel Hays, Wm. E. Roop, J. 

C. Beahm, Jos. W. Cline, Wm. M. Wine, S. C. Garber, 
L. D. Ikenberry, J. H. Yost, J. A. Hoover, James A. Fry, 

D. N. Eller. I. S. Long, Mrs. Long, Eld. D. B. Garber, 
J. M. Cox, W. K. Franklin. 

298 LARGE OCTAVO PAGES. 

CLOTH BINDING. 

GILT STAMPING. 

PRICE ONLY $1.50. 



PROCEEDS FOR THE BENEFIT OF POOR 
STUDENTS. 



ORDER AT ONCE FROM 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 

Orders will also be filled at Timberville, Va., by J. A. 
Garber. and at Bridgewater, Va., by W. T. Myers. 



JOHN THE BAPTIST 



Ju5t from the Press. 



The Tenth Book of the Bible 
Biography Series. 



Following is a list of the books now ready: 

1. Joseph the Ruler. 

2. Samuel the Judge. 

3. David the King. 

4. Daniel the Fearless. 

5. Moses the Leader. 

6. Jesus the Savior. Vol. 1. 

7. Jesus the Savior. Vol. 2. 

8. Ruth the Truehearted. 

9. Esther the Queen. 
10. John the Baptist. 



'l*'l"l"I"l"i'*T'*i"'i**»'"r*f* 



Suitable 
Gifts 
for 
the 

Young 



'i"i"i"i"i"i"i"i"i"i*'i"i' 




BIBLE BI06FAP0IES 




Thj/Wordisabmp 
'unto my Feet 
and 

\jJLiffhtuntoinjPafhr 
David 

\ 7qllp» Me, as iFoltm 
'\ChriiV'Paul. 






These books contain beautiful stories of the Bible char- 
acters named, in such clear and forcible, yet simple 
language, that all become intensely interested in them. 

Our Special Proposition. 

These books are illustrated, bound in cloth, with a 
handsome cover design. Price, per copy, 35 cents. Three 
for $1.00. 

We propose to make you this special proposition. By 
you stating in your order where you saw this advertise- 
ment we will send you this entire set of ten books pre- 
paid for only $2.75. Every home where there are chil~ 
dren ought to have a set of these books. Parents, you- 
can't afford to miss this opportunity of supplying your 
children with such helpful books. Don't delay but send 
your order at once to 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois... 



the: ingl-einook. 




Matthew flenry. 



P DOUBLE UMPKIN 
DOUBLE I 
DOUBLE UMPKIN 
UMPKIN PIE 

WHY NOT COME TO THE 

LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 

FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 

Where Pumpkins, Corn and common crops grow, as well as every kind 
erf California fruit? 

Come and visit the Brethren who are living here and see what they have 
done in the past two years. 

Nearly 600 sales made since we put this land on the market and over 2,000 
people now living on the grant where there were but abcnit sixty a little over 
five years ago. 

This does not look like a temporary boom, does it? Must be something 
solid behind all this. If not, five years ought to show up the weakness, but 
instead of weakening the Laguna and its various interests are growing stronger 
all the time. 

If you are thinking of coming to California to make a home you cannot 
afford to overlook this place. 

We still have plenty of good land with abundant water for irrigation. 
The price is from $30.00 to $60.00 per acre, terms, one-fourth cash, balance 
in eight annual payments. 

COLONISTS' RATES 

will again be in force March 1 to May IS, 190S. 

From Chicago to Laton, $33.00 

From Chicago to Lillis, $33.00 

From Chicago to Kingsburg, $33.00 

From Mississippi River to Laton, $30.00 

From Missouri River to Laton, $25.00 

Make your plans to start for California March 1st and you will be in time 
to buy land and put in a crop. 

Write us for free printed matter and local newspaper. Address 

NARES & SAUNDERS, - Laton, California. 

33tX3 mention tne INGLENOOK wben wrlttng. 



COMMENTARY ON 
TBE BIBLE 



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We have reduced the price of this 
commentary until it is within the reach 
of all. Every minister and Bible student 
who does not already have a set of these 
books ought to take advantage . of this 
special offer. Better send your order at 
once. Address, 

Brethren Pablishing House, 

ELGIN, ILLINOIS. 



C A^N C E R 

Cored wltboHt 
Surg«ry or 
Palii. 
O n r latest 
book which 
[we will send 
free of thargt 
tells ftllaboui 
Cancer and 
all chronic 
and malig- 
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es , and how 
they can be 
cured at home quickly and at small ex- 
pense, reference, patients cured in every 
State and Territory, ministers & bankers 

Addresi, Drs. Bioeliart k Co., Lock 6oxC9, Eokomo, Ind. 




WE MAKE PURE, HOME-MADE 

Apple Butter 

None better made. Safely shipped anywhere. 
Write to-day for particulars to 



C. J. MILLER & CO., 



Smilhvilie, Ohio. 



IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
PLEASE MENTION THE INGLE- 
NOOK. 



THE INGL-ENOOK, 



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Sent on Approval 

TO RBSPOMSIBLS PBOPLB 

Laughlin 

FOUNTAIN 
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aaarmteed FIneat Qrtde 14k. 

SOLID GOLD PEN 

To test the merits of this pub- 
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iolder Is made of the finest 
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purposes $1.00 axtra. 

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AS you can secure for three 
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makes, U not entirely satis- 
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Lay this Publication 
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Safety Pocket Pea Holder 
tent free of charge with each 
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_ ADDRESS 

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4S> OrlawoldSt. Detroit. Mich. 



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Pi. 

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The Inglenook 
COOK BOOK 



We have sent out thousands of 
these Cook Books as premiums. 
So great was the demand that a 
second edition was published. 
We are still receiving numerous 
calls for this Cook Book. For this 
reason we have decided to"dispose 
of the few remaining copies at 
25 cents per copy. To'insure a 
copy it will be necessary for you 
to order at once. .. . Send to 

BBETSBEN VTTBJJBBXlta SOVB£. 
Eljfln, lUinotB. 



Cap Goods! 

<)ur luisinoss has alniusl iloubloii it- 
sell' iliirinpT tl'P last .vear. Wc are st-iul- 
ltiR' H(in(l.<; \.)y rnail to tliou.saiid.s of 
permanent, sallsfieil onstomers tlirongli- 
ont the T'niled .'^lales. The reason Is 
simple. 

Our DoodB B.re Keliable. Our Variety is 
Larffe. Our Prices are I^ow. 

All •orders filled promptl.v. postpaid. 
Satisf action Knaranteed ov .vour money 
refunded. Send us a sample order and 
be convinced. "^A'rite us t'oi- a bool^let 
of unsoiiciteil testimonials and new line 
of samples, which will be furnished 
free. Send at once to 

B. E. ABITOI^D, Elgin, HI. 

500 Bible Studies 

^=^ Compiled by — 

HAROLD F. SAYLES 



CAP GOODS 



^JU 



This new book contains 500 short, 
sharp, concise. Outline Bible Read- 
ings, contributed by prominent work- 
ers from all over the world. The se- 
lections cover a larger range of sub- 
jects, and will be very useful to one 
in private study, as well as helpful 
in preparing to conduct a meeting on 
short notice. The book will be in- 
valuable to ministers. It will be 
found very helpful in preparing out- 
lines for Bible study and for prayer 
meeting. It will prove a source of 
pleasure and profit for all Bible stu- 
dents. 

The collection is being enthusias- 
tically received, and is also sold at a 
price within reach of all. Books of 
this character, but containing far less 
material, often sell for $1.00 or more. 

The book includes a complete in- 
dex of subjects arranged alphabetic- 
ally. Note a few of the outlines: — 

JESUS IS ABI^E. 

Having been given " all' power." Matt. 
28: 18, and liaving destroyed tlie 
works of the devil, 1 John 
3 : 8. Jesus is able to. 
Save to the uttermost, Heb. 7: 26. 
Make all grace abound, 2 Cor. 9: 8. 
Succor the tempted, Heb. 2: 18. 
Make us stand, Rom. 14; 4. 
Keep us from falling, Jude 24. 
Subdue all things, Philpp. 3: 21. 
Keep that committed to him, 2 Tim, 

1:12. 
Perform what he has promised, Rom. 

4:21. 
Do above all we ask or think, Eph. 
3: 20. 
Knowing his grace and power, shall 
we not come and say. " Yea, Lord " ? 
Matt. 9:28. F. S. Shepherd. 

THE B£OOD^-Heb. 9:22. 

1. Peace has been made through the 
blood. Col. 1: 20. 

2. Justified by the blood. Rom. 5: 9. 

3. Redemption by the blood. Eph. 1:7: 
Col. 1: 14: 1 Pet. 1:18. 

4. This redemption is eternal. Heb. 9: 
11-14; Heb. 10:10-16. 

5. Cleansed by the blood. 1 John 1:7; 
Rev. 1: 6; Rev. 7: 14. 

6. We enter into the holiest by the 
blood. Heb. 10: 19. 

7. Overcome in heaven by the blood. 
Rev. 12: 11. 

8. Then sing the song forever to the 
blood of the Lamb. Rev. 5: 9. 

Rev. J, R. Dean. 

Price, limp cloth cover, 25 cents, 
prepaid. 

BBETBBEN FUBI^ISHIKa BOUSE, 
Elgin, IllinolB. 



LARQESr ASSORTMENT. 
BEST VALUES. 



SendiPostal Card for Free Sam- . » 
pies and Premium List. J. 



f* A. L. uAKDNEK, Lock°Box I44, j 
WASHINGTON, D. C. * 

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"COLLAR BUTTON" 

Plain; just what you have been lookiiif: for. 
You ^will be delighted. Sample, 10 cents; 
three for 25 cents. GEO. B. HOLSINGBR, 
Bi'idgewater, Va. 3t8 



FDRNP^rac 




WRITE 
TO ■ DAY 



lor our big 
tree furni- 
ture catalog. 
It represents 
the largest 
and most 
complete assort- 
ment in the ■world of 
FINEMADEFIK- 
KlTUUEf or parlor, 
dining room, bed 
room, library, hall, -veranda, 
kitchen, store, office or any part 
of a house. We sell furniture in 
single pieces at same prices deal- 
ers pay for furniture in wholesale 
quantities. We sell 
Library TablcAntS3. 80 up 

Itookcases at 4*75 up 

l*re@Bers nt 4.95 up 

ChlfiTonlere at 3.80 up 

IronBed^ at 2a05 up 

i^ldeboard^ at 0.75 up 

Wood Kockers at ,75 up 
Parlor Suites. .nt 8.70up 
and every style and kind of re- 
liable furniture at correspond- 
ingly low prices. From this 
catalog vou can select any article of fui> 
niturewith best judgment and greatest 
ecrnomy. WE FURNISH HOMES 
COMPLETE at factory prices with 
furniture, carpett*, curtains 
fttOTee, tableware, and every- 
thing needed to furnish and 
adorn a home from top to bot- 
tom. Write to-day slating 
goods wanted and we will send 
a catalog ot the goods desired by 
return mail, free with postage 
paid. Address 

EQUITY- MFG. CO. 

CHICAGO, ILL 




IN ANSWERING ADVERTISEMENTS 
PLEASE MENTION THE INGLE- 
NOOK. 



I Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



^ 

^ 



¥ rX A LJ /^ is the best-watered arid State in America. Brethren are moving there because hot 
ll^Xm.1 IV-r winds, destructive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- 
mate it makes life bright and worth living. 
We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a 
change for the general improvement in your condition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on 
account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise 
and sensibk thing to do; that is, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions to an- 
swer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad 
fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see 
for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. 



100,000 Acres Now Open for Settlement at 
Twin Falls, Idaho, under the Carey Act. 

Unlimited supply of water for irrigation and for power. A grand opportunity for the Home- 
seeker who locates on th^se lands. 10 years time given for payment for land and water after lands 
are sold. The canals and water belong to the settlers who will own and control the same. 



Homeseekers' Roiind=Trip Excursion Tickets 

will be sold to points in Idaho on the first and third Tuesday of February, March and April, 1905. 
The rate will apply from Missouri river points and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloomington, Peoria and 
St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific from stations on their line 
in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip, plus $2.00, with 
limit of 15 days going. Return passage may commence any day within final limit of 21 days from 
dat€ of sale of tickets. Tickets for return v«ll be good for continuous passage to starting point. 

COLONISTS' ONE WAY SECOND CLASS tickets will be sold to above points from March 
first to May 15th inclusive. 

Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. Fine 
Grazing: Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 



^ Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 

^ Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 

^ to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 

5 or March the yield would have been much larger. 

^ Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 

^ oats. 

^ Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 

5 the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) K L. Dotson. 

^ D. E. BURLEY, 

A S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

3 J. E. HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. Salt Lake City, Utah. 

^ Huition the INOLENOOK wh«n writlB«. iOtl3 



mlNSbENOOK 



Vol. VII. 



February 14, 1905. 



No. 7. 



FACE PICTURES. 



SELECTICD BY LOTTIE M. BOLLINGER. 



We write our lives upon our faces, 4eep, 
An autograph which they will always keep. 
Thoughts cannot come and leave behind no trace 
Of good or ill; they quickly find a place 
Where they who will may read as in a book, 
The hidden meaning of our slightest look. 

Reach for the things above — to those who climb, 

Steps ne'er are wanting; ever the sublime 

Allures us onward, and our lives will be 

Just what we make them, to eternity. 

What they now are, the face will surely show 

Like the footprints on a field of untrod snow. 

Time deepens all the lines or dark or fair — 
Lines carved by grief or chiseled deep by care. 
Thoughts into actions very quickly grow; - 
Actions are seeds which everyone must sow, 
They reap the richest harvest of good deeds, 
Who sow but loving words, most precious seeds. 



Vestaburg, Mich. 



- — Presbyterian Banner. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



A FEW WHYS. 



BY ADAH BAKER. 



JVhy do people sacrifice principle for policy? 

Why do they go Into raptures over any of Dame 
Fa-shion's decrees? 

* 

Why do people consider it their duty instead of 
privilege to go to clmrch? 

* 

Why do people try to hammer the unfortunate 
one Hatter yet than wliat he is? 

Why do people set an alarm clock day after day 
■and tlten continue to disobey its voice? 

4> 

Why is more time spent on studying how to get 
■out of a task than it takes time to do the task? 



Why do people enjoy complaining about the 
weather? 

Why do people satisfy thetnselves with the delusion 
that they are going to do better next time? 

* 

Why do children knozu so much more about Santa 
Claus than the true meaning of Christinas? 

* 

Why do people feel under obligation to do things 
solely because the other people are doing that way? 

Why do men persist in loving their money when 
the Bible declares that the love of it is the root of all 
evil? 

* 

Why do women go into raptures over a style that 
zmll in a few years hence appear hideous to say the 
least? 

♦ 
Why is it that people who are all the time telling 
what great things they are going to do, get nothing 
done? 

* 

Why do people become so fettered to the zvorld 
that they dare not consult their ozvn ideas of right 
and wrong? 

* 
Why do people with a cold and deliberate act of 
the will cast aside those influences which are pointing 
to eternal life? 

* 

Why do so many boys and girls succeed in getting 
through high school without getting any of the high 
school through them? 

After speaking reproachfidly of our more favored 
brother, why do our views change so quickly should 
we chance to gain his position? 

* 

Why do men when in their better moments hear 
the Holy Spirit pleading with them to lead better lives 
and then deliberately turn it azvay? 

Palestine, Ohio. 



146 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 14, 1905. 



THE NOBLE PRIZES. 



SENDING TIME SIGNALS. 



BY A. W. VANIMAN. 



Sweden is a land that is far advanced in educa- 
tion, and in the estabHshment of institutions of a 
charitable character. Their schools are of a high 
grade and school attendance is compulsory. Many 
worthy institutions are in existence, whose purpose is 
to benefit the poor and unfortunate. It is a very com- 
mon occurrence to read in the papers that some 
wealthy person, either living or by will, had donated 
a large sum of money for some charitable purpose or 
to advance education. 

Some few years ago a man by the name of Noble, 
by will, donated something like 30,000,000 kroners 
(about 800,000 dollars) as a fund of which the interest 
was to be used as an encouragement in the different 
lines of educational research. The different subjects 
for which prizes are given are Literature, Medicine, 
Chemistry and Physics. There is a fifth one to be 
given in the interest of Peace. These prizes are not 
confined to residents of Sweden, but may be given to 
any one in other nations who is considered to be en- 
titled to it. 

A committee appointed for the purpose determines 
who is entitled to these prizes, and what is called 
Noble Day is an interesting event in Sweden. The 
king presents the prizes to those present or their rep- 
resentatives. The amount of the prizes this year is 
about 37,800 dollars each, a sum not to be lightly re- 
garded, to say nothing of the honor that naturally 
attends the prize. 

These prizes were given to the one who, during the 
year, brought forward some great discovery or made 
some great research in one of these subjects. 

This is the fourth year that the prizes have been 
given. 

Two of them went to Englishmen. Prof. J. W. 
Rayleigh, of London, in physics, and Sir W. Ramsay, 
of London, for chemistry. The prize for physiology 
and medicine was given to a physician in St. Peters- 
burg, Russia, L P. Pawlow. The prize in literature 
is divided this year between two Frenchmen and a 
Spaniard. 

Among those who have received these prizes in the 
past may be mentioned Prof. Roentgen, of Germany, 
who discovered X rays ; Prof. V. Bering, who discov- 
ered diphtheria serum, also a German ; Mr. and Mrs. 
Curie and Prof. Becquerel, of France, who discovered 
radium. 

It is said that Mr. Noble secured his fortune by 
discoveries in connection with dynamite. Although 
he made his money out of the material that is assisting 
in doing such deadly work in war, he has now willed 
that it shall be used to advance the cause of peace. 

Malnt'o, Sweden. 



The plan pursued in sending daily time signals 
from Washington is as follows : A few minutes be- 
fore noon telegraph wires in one of the roonis of the 
Naval Observatory are connected with a cup contain- 
ing mercury under the pendulum of the master clock. 
With every swing a point on the pendulum comes 
in contact with the fluid. An electric current is thus 
enabled to flow through the wires for an infinitesimal 
fraction of a second and then ceases. An ordinary 
telegraph sounder in the room gives a click with each 
contact. Any number of circuits, including distant 
cities, can be actuated by the same apparatus. Hun- 
dreds of sounders, in railway and telegraph offices, 
in Government bureaus and in astronomical observa- 
tories, all respond in unison to the tick of the master 
clock. Human agency is necessary in switching cir- 
cuits on and off, before and after this service is ren- 
dered, but the signals themselves are sent automatical- 
ly by a timepiece whose regulation by telescopic ob- 
servations of the stars, is one of the finest pieces of 
scientific work done in Washington. 

The clicking of the sounders may continue for 
about five minutes, beginning at 11:55 -^^ ^'J^- ^Y 
means of a simple bit of clockwork an interruption 
is effected ten seconds before noon. Attention is ar- 
rested by this silence, and men who have taken out 
their watches when the preparatory signals began now 
stop talking and listen eagerly. Exactly at noon the 
clock again actuates on the sounders, the hour being 
indicated by the first click after the pause. 

The same plan can be adapted to midnight service, 
and also for i, 2 and 3 A. M., Eastern time, for the 
benefit of those parts of this country which use Cen- 
tral, Mountain and Pacific time, respectivel_v. The ro- 
tation of the earth requires four minutes for each de- 
gree of longitude, so that where " Standard " time is 
used there is a difference of an hour for every fifteen 
degrees. New England and a part of the Middle At- 
lantic States region are governed by the seventy-fifth 
meridian, which is exactly five hours away from 
Greenwich, the world's starting point in reckoning 
time as well as longitude. Chicago and Minneapolis 
are near the ninetieth meridian, Denver almost ex- 
actly on the hundred and fifth and San Francisco 
near the one hundred and twentieth. In each suc- 
cessive belt, going westward to the middle of the 
Pacific Ocean, midnight comes an hour later than it 
does in the one next preceding. Going the other way, 
it comes an hour earlier for every fifteen degrees. 
Nearly all civilized countries have now adopted the 
system, but a few still stick to local or solar time. 
France still obstinately holds out, and Paris clocks dif- 
fer from those in London about nine minutes. Mad- 
rid and Greenwich are fifteen minutes apart in fact, 



THF. I NGLENOOK.— February 14. 1905. 



147 



but Spain has sensibly joined the procession. A trav- 
eler from England does not have to set his watch again 
while in Spain to insure keeping appointments and 
catching trains. 

If a message which is more elaborate than a clock 
tick is sent, a few seconds would be required in the 
manipulation of a telegraph kept by an operator. 
Hence a little time would be consumed in trans- 
mission. Again, in communicating with countries on 
the other side of the globe, it is necessary to use land 
wires and ocean cables successively. A single cur- 
rent that embraces both cannot be operated. Hence 
at certain points the message must be taken off and re- 
peated. The chief delay in reaching Australia and 
Japan would be due to the necessity for repetition, 
not the actual transmission. In ordinary commercial 
business the delay at junctions might amount to many 
minutes, or even two or three hours. But when spe- 
cial arrangements have been made in advance for co- 
operation the aggregate might be reduced to a minute 
or two. — Cincinimti Enquirer. 

* * * 

ARE YOUR LUNGS WHITE OR BLACK ? 



If you ever have a chance to go to the museum in 
connection with the Edinburgh University, at which 
Andrew Carnegie is Lord Rector, or Chief Ranger, 
or something of the sort, you will see some strange 
objects in a glass case that will do more to teach you 
the value of fresh air than all the books that were 
ever written. 

Last year a professor secured the lungs of an Es- 
quimau, a Londoner and a coal miner. He has had 
them preserved with some kind of a chemical process, 
and they are now side by side in a glass case. The 
Esquimau's lungs are pure white ; the Londoner's 
lungs are a dirty brown; and the coal miner's lungs 
are jet black. 

The Esquimau had kept his lungs clean, not be- 
cause he knew more about breathing than the Lon- 
doner or the coal miner, but because he lived in a 
land of snow fields and spent his time in the open air. 
It is a curious fact that every Esquimau who is brought 
to our large cities dies of consumption in a few years. 

All of us that run up and down in the skyscraper 
canyons of Chicago or New York or Boston have no 
chance to breathe the dustless, germless air of Green- 
land or Alaska. The whitest lungs in an .American 
city will be a shade darker than the hue of a lily. 

In a large city, our fresh air, like our fresh eggs, 
might be fresher. Therefore it is much more necessary 
to make the best use of what we have. When our 
fresh air is stale, what must our stale air be? 

There is a young man in a clothing house who 
takes his watch regularly, once a year, to a jeweler's, 
so that it will always be in good condition. Yet this 



\oung man is in the first stages of consumption, and 
lie is not taking any steps to escape from the " white 
plague." 

He could buy another watch with a week's salary, 
but in two years he will need a new pair of lungs, and 
all the money in the world will not buy them. 

You need not think that this young man is an un- 
usually stupid specimen. The fact is that he is like 
half of the men and women of our cities — he pays 
less attention to his lungs than to his watch or his 
piano or his bicycle. 

To breathe stale air is just as bad for the wonderful 
machine which we call the lungs as it would be to drop 
a pinch of dust into your watch, or to empty the but- 
ton bag into the piano, or throw a spadeful of ashes 
over a bicycle. 

Some of the greatest men in the world have had con- 
sumption, but most of them have had the sense and 
the will power to cure themselves. Napoleon, Goethe, 
Von Moltke, Emerson and Cecil Rhodes are five cases 
of cure. 

Now it is easy for a doctor or a writer to say, " If 
you have weak lungs go to the mountains or live out- 
doors all day long." But it is not so easy for others 
to take this advice. In thousands of cases it is im- 
possible. 

There might just as well be a fresh air trust so far 
as some wage earners are concerned. The only chance 
they get to walk in the open air is when they lose 
their jobs, and then they are not usually in the right 
frame of mind to enjoy the walk. 

But there is one thing that every one can do — 
keep the windows open at night. For eight hours a 
day you sleep. If you keep your windows open and 
let a current of air blow through your bedroom you 
will be doing the right thing for one-third of the time. 

In fact, Professor Biermer calls consumption a 
" bedroom disease." As long as people live and sleep 
in egg-box tenements, with all the windows shut 
tightly against the air that feeds them, there are no 
doctors and no writers and no medicines that can cure 
them. — Herbert N. Casson, Health Culture. 

PROVERBIAL CONTRADICTION. 



Some proverbs I've been reading, and I find 
One says that " Out of sight is out of mind;" 
But if that's so, how can it too be true 
That "Distance lends enchantment to the view"? 
And yet again, if it be true, I ponder 
How is it "Absence makes the heart grow fonder"? 
— Henry \Valdorf Francis. 
* ♦ ♦ 

By this we know that we love the children of God, 
when we love God and keep his commandments. — i 
John 5 : 2. 



148 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 14, 1905. 



THE MINISTER'S EWE-LAMB. 



A Story of Service in Country and Town. 

The minister walked homeward in the gloaming 
through the sweet m^eadows. There was a beautiful 
new gold watch ticking away in his waistcoat pocket, 
and his mind was filled with the memory of the kind 
wishes and words that had just been uttered at his 
farewell meeting. 

He sighed as he thought of the many kind friends he 
was leaving, and of the new untried path that lay be- 
fore him. " God give me grace and wisdom," he mur- 
mured, " that I may see nothing but his glory." 

Looking back upon the last three years, there seemed 
so much to blame himself for, so little room for praise, 
and all that the brethren had said of him to-night out 
of file depths of their kind hearts, he felt was so little 
deserved. The)- did not know of all the mistakes and 
failures — they were only known to his own heart and to 
God. 

The minister unlatched the little garden gate, and 
kt himself into his house with his latchkey. There 
was a light burning in his study. He pushed open the 
door and went in. Lying upon the couch, with her 
face hidden, was a young girl — the minister's daughter 
— his one treasure. 

She lifted her face at the sound of his footstep, and 
then he saw that she was crying. 

He came quickly to her side, and put his hand upon 
her golden head. 

" Is the pain bad again, DoUv ? " he asked, anxious- 

ly- 

She smiled up at him — a bright, reassuring little 
smile, though tears were still falling down her cheeks. 

" Oh, no," she said ; " I have only been thinking 
and worrying, father." 

"What about, Dolly?" 

" Oh," she said, " I am so useless to you dear, and 
I long so earnestly to be able to help 5'ou. Here in 
the country, where everyone is kind, there have been 
little things even a cripple girl could do — little visits 
I could manage to make, and tracts to leave, though 
not nearly all I want to do for you. But when we 
go to London, father, I can never hope to be the least 
bit of good there. Nothing but a drag and burden to 
you — an added care, instead of a blessing." 

The minister's hand brushed back the curls from the 
white forehead lovingly, and there was silence in the 
little room for a moment, only broken by the sleepy 
twitter of a little bird outside. Then he said softly : 

" It may be that God has some special bit of work in 
London that only my little cripple Dolly can do. 
Some poor heart that only Dolly can reach. He has 



work for all in his great vineyard — even for you, lit- 
tle one." 

And Dolly soon found work, for only a few Sundays- 
had passed, and she had scarce grown accustomed 
to the crowds and noise of East London, when they 
pressed her into service, and, timid and frightened, 
she sat down in the Sunday school at the head of a 
class of big girls. 

She had never seen girls like them^ before. They 
were nearly all older than Dolly in years, and in knowl- 
edge of the world and its wickedness they were fair- 
ly grandmothers beside this little teacher. Most of 
them earned their own living by working in factories, 
and they looked at Dolly curiously — half in contempt 
and half in pity. 

But such a gentle little teacher she was ; so ignorant 
of earthly things, yet so full of the knowledge of 
Jesus and his love that her heart fairly overflowed with 
its sweetness. She had suffered so much in her short 
life, and through her pain Jesus had been the one Com- 
fort. So dear was his name to her, and so rich in 
blessed memories, that almost before she had timidly 
breathed it aloud all her shyness was forgotten, and her 
eager face flushed up in its earnestness as she spoke 
of him. 

How the girls listened. They had never been taught 
like this before. 

" Oh, Liza, ain't she an angel ? " one girl whispered 
under her breath. 

" Hush," said Liza, " and listen." 
Dolly was happy. She had found something that 
even she could do, and her thoughts were always full 
of her class. It was wonderful the hold she gained 
upon the girls, and all the week long she was planning 
lessons and talks and schemes for them. If she 
chanced to meet one of the girls in the street there was 
always a sunny smile of greeting ready, and her lit- 
tle gloved hand would go out to shake the rough and 
often dirty one of her scholar, who would pass on 
feeling as though an angel had stopped to talk to her 
on the way. 

It almost seemed like helping father, Dolly thought, 
to be caring for these girls ; but there was something 
more she longed to do to help him, and yet she dared 
not attempt anything, even if she had known what tO' 
attempt. She could pray, and, never dreaming how 
the answer would come, Dolly prayed about this, and 
sometimes hushed her breath at the thought that God 
might use even her. 

This matter that was so laid upon Dolly's heart was 
about an enemy of her father's. He had been an- 
enemy to her father's predecessors in the circuit, and 
from the first day's ministry had been a trial to Dolly's 
father. He came to all the meetings with the prime 
object of upsetting them. His heart seemed like a 



THE INGLENOOK.— Fchrunry 14. 1903 



149 



millstone; nothing touched it and nothing was sacred 
to him. He jeered at the minister, scoffed at the 
hymns, ridiculed the Bible, and turned everything that 
was holy and beautiful into sorry jesting. He was a 
dreadful trial at the open air meetings, for there he 
wou'd gather a crowd of kindred spirits around him, 
and between them it was well nigh impossible to con- 
duct any sort of services whatever. Every time the 
■chapel opened he was there, seated just in front of the 
minister, with his daughter by his side, and the preach- 
er needed all grace and resolution to enable him to 
forget that jeering face before him, and to preach his 
sermon undisturbed by the audible sneers that fell 
from old Abel's lips. 

Dolly thought so much about this wicked old man, 
■chiefly because he was such an ever present trial and 
hindrance to her father, and perhaps a little because 
his daughter was one of her girls, and her girls filled 
her thoughts from daybreak to sunset. Oh, if Liza 
could only be brought to know Jesus, for who, like 
Liza, could influence old Abel for good? How splen- 
didly the meetings would go if z\bel helped, instead of 
hindered, and how her dear father's work would be 
lightened, if only the thousand and one annoyances 
imposed upon him by his enemy were done away with. 
But Dolly did not know how to move in the matter, 
or what to plan ; there was nothing at all save prayer. 

In a small back room, up a great many flights of 
stairs, a girl was moving about dusting and arranging 
the scanty furniture. It was Liza, and old Abel sat 
by the window smoking a long " churchwarden," in- 
tently watching his daughter. 

Presently, as she was passing him, he put out his 
hand, and drew her to his side. 

" Where's your grit gone, Liza? " he questioned, " I 
-can't make top nor tail of you lately, stopping in to 
tidy the place, as meek and mild as a lamb. You used 
to be off about the streets fast enough, and many's the 
bit of sauce you've given your dad if he ventured to 
speak a word about it. What's come over you, my 
gal?" 

Liza lifted her face shyly to his, and her colour rose 
as she said : 

" I've got converted, father." 

The old man's only answer was a gruff grunt, but 
now that the ice was once broken, the girl went on 
■ eagerly : 

" I wanted to tell you all about it, father, only I was 
afraid you would laugh at me. It was all through 
Miss Dolly. Oh, father, j'ou don't know the ways she 
talks to us in class. It isn't like teaching a bit, it is 
just like listening to one of God's angels. We never 
had nobody like her before. I never used to even 
' listen to the other teachers, but somehow I. couldn't 



help wanting to hear what she said ; and then — some- 
how, I began to want to be good, too. And things I 
used to like — larking about the streets with the girls 
and chaps, and that — I didn't care a bit for any more. 
I felt so wretched and unhappy, I knew I wasn't fit 
to die, and I wanted God to make me better, but he 
seemed such a long way oft', and I couldn't find my 
way to him alone. 

" And then, you know, father, just when I was feel- 
ing bad like this, Miss Dolly was too poorly to come 
to class, and two or three Sundays I went hoping to 
find her there, and thinking she would, maybe, say 
something that would comfort me a bit, but there was 
always a fresh teacher, and though I tried to listen, 
they didn't seem like Miss Dolly." 

She paused and glanced at her father, but he was 
busily engaged in re-filling his pipe, and apparently was 
taking but little notice or her words. Still Eliza went 
on softly : 

" Then one night, I was very', very wretched, and I 
happened to go by the minister's house, and there was 
a light in Miss Dolly's room, and I thought I would 
make bold to go and knock, and ask if she was better. 

" The servant asked me to come inside, and presently 
she came downstairs and said Miss Dolly would like 
to see me. So I went up into such a lovely room, fa- 
ther. It fairly dazzled my eyes, it was all so pretty, 
and there on the sofa was my dear Miss Dolly, looking 
so white and tired, but smiling like she always does 
when she saw me. And nothing would do but I must 
sit down beside her and talk — me in my old factory 
dress, and her so dainty and sweet — but she talked 
just as if she didn't feel the least difference between 
us, and she put her little white hands on my big ones, 
and asked me if I loved the Lord Jesus. 

" And then, you know, all my wretchedness that I 
had half-forgotten for the moment, came back like a 
great flood, and I broke down and cried, and told her 
all about it, just the same as I am telling you, father. 

" All the time she kept her pretty hands on mine, 
and when I could look up I saw the tears running down 
her cheeks, just as though she knew all about how 
miserable I had felt, and she said: 

" ' Oh, Liza, I can't tell you how happy you have 
made me; for I have been praying for you and your 
father ever since I knew you, and now I know God is 
going to answer my prayers. Let us tell him all about 
it.' 

" Then she prayed so beautifully for you and for me, 
father, and somehow, while she was praying, all the 
misery went away, like a great burden rolling off, and 
I felt so happy. 

" Won't you be converted too, father ? We are 
both praying for you now." 

But all the answer Liza got to her question was 
another, but deeper, grunt. 



ISO 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 14, 1905. 



The weather grew intensely hot as the summer drew 
to a close, and Dolly's little stock of strength failed, 
so that every day had to be spent upon the sofa in her 
room, much to her regret, for there seemed such a lot 
of work to be done before the three years' sojourn 
ended, and it was hard to lie still^ and be patient. 
Still she managed it, and always had a smile ready to 
break forth for any chance visitor, or if she heard -the 
quick step of the busy minister coming up the stairs 
to her room. 

He came late one Saturday night after the usual 
prayer meeting, and Dolly knew at once, by his face, 
that he was bringing good news. 

" You've got something to tell me," she said con- 
fidently. 

But the minister didn't say anything for a full five 
minutes beyond : 

" God bless you, little daughter, and make you more 
and more a blessing." 

She smiled up at him in her old way, her eyes 
bright with expectation, and then he told her all about 
the prayer meeting, how the first person to come after 
he reached the vestry was old Abel, and how his — 
the minister's — heart had failed him at that, for he 
felt the service was as good as spoilt now. 

How old Abel had sat wonderfully quiet and at- 
tentive until the meeting was well under way, and 
then he had suddenly stood up, and one of the stew- 
ards was taking his arm to try and get him to go out 
quietly, but he began to speak, telling them a wonder- 
ful story of how God had been working in his wicked 
old heart. All this time the steward kept a tight grip 
of Abel's sleeve. 

" We were all surprised but never doubted that it 
was some new freak of Abel's, faithless workers that 
we are, mistrusting the Almighty Power that even 
the winds and waves obey. 

" You could have heard a pin drop," said the min- 
ister, " as Abel went on to tell us of his daughter's 
conversion. He said he had never believed in con- 
versions at all, thinking them merely a boast of su- 
periority on the part of parsons, and such like peo- 
ple. He said he had always scoffed at the mention 
of it until he saw the wonderful change in Liza. He 
watched her day after day, expecting to see her fall 
back into the old ruts, but instead found her check- 
ing herself on the brink of a display of temper, or the 
utterance of a bad word. ' She used to say them pret- 
ty well as easy as I did,' said Abel, ' and think noth- 
ing of it, but now the girl, altered altogether. So 
gentle and thoughtful stopping at home to see to my 
food and clothes, and she said it was conversion 
changed her, and that she was praying for me, and 
that little Miss Dolly had been praying for me ever 
since she knew me.' 

"Well, Dolly," said the minister; "that broke him 
up altogether. He couldn't get over the thought of 



your praying for him every day for nearly three years. 
He said the thought of it tormented him night and 
morning, till he was forced to cry: 

" ' I yield, I yield ! I can hold out no more.' 
" Oh, little daughter, in the end our prayer meeting 
was turned into a praise meeting. I only wish you 
could have been there. It was like being at the very 
gate of heaven. After to-night we can indeed say: 
' Is anything too hard to do for the Lord ? ' And 
you, Dolly, grieving over your lack of usefulness! 
You have done more than all my sermons." 

And Dolly and the minister rejoiced together. — 
Methodist Recorder. 

* ♦ ♦ 

ABOUT MAHOGANY. 



The United States is not a mahogany growing 
country, unless Cuba may now be said to be a part 
of the United States. It is a tropical wood. Its home 
is in Central America and in Cuba, Jamaica and Santo 
Domingo. British Honduras, Guatemala and Nica- 
ragua give the most and Mexico the largest timber. 
The richer, solid, heavy varieties come from the islands. 
These will not float. They are susceptible of a high 
polish, and the wood has a rich, wavy figure. The 
pretty figured pieces of wood are of great value. A 
six-foot piece (which included the crotch of the tree) 
in a certain shipment will bring about $500 when cut 
into veneers. 

' No matter where a shipment of the wood comes 
from or what variety it is there are always more or 
less of the fine, flaky sticks that make veneer. Mahog- 
any is a phenomenal wood, in that it does not warp 
under any conditions of weather, use or age; neither 
does it shrink. It is of great beauty, hardness and 
durability. In no other wood can these qualities be 
found combined with large size, uniformity of grain 
and richness of color and figure. 

The island timbers are eight to ten feet in length 
by twelve inches in diameter, some from Cuba, how- 
ever, reaching thirty-five feet in length by two feet 
in diameter. Honduras squared timbers are as long 
as forty feet by two feet in diameter, and the three- 
foot and four-foot timbers come from Mexico. The 
softer mahogany comes from the swampy lands. There 
are no mahogany forests ; the trees are not grouped 
that way, the individual trees being more or less 
widely separated. Like other trees, the core is the 
poorest part, often being worthless. 

A schooner load represents the expenditure of about 
$13,000. That is not all for the timber, labor and 
freight, a considerable part of it representing " grease " 
to the Spanish custom officers, whose favor is not 
obtained by a smile. There are no sawmills in the 
mahoganv growing countries. The trees when cut 
down are squared by hand. An Indianapolis company 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 14, 1905. 



151 



is going to have them hewn into octagon shape here- 
after instead of squares, believing it will get twenty- 
five per cent more timber out of them this way. Oxen 
are used for the haul to the water, and the timbers are 
rafted and floated to larger streams, where larger rafts 
are made and sent to a loading port. Having arrived 
there, the lumberman's trouble and expenses are not 
half over. 

The coming and going of ships to these small ports 
are not regulated like the running of railroad trains. 
It may be announced that a ship will be there on the 
4th and there is great scurrying to get the timber 
ready. When the ships do get there they will not wait 
for the arrival of their timber cargo, but will sail away 
without it if it is not ready. So the rafts are anchored. 
There is a worm, or marine borer that likes mahogany, 
and he goes promptly to work. If the ship does not 
arrive on time and is not sighted within a day or two 
the timber must all be hauled up on the beach or ev- 
er\' timber turned over daily. The worm does not 
make fast time in boring, and if the side he is working 
on is turned to the hot sun before the borer gets more 
than an inch or so in it will scorch him to death. — 
Cincinnati Enquirer. 

* ♦ ♦ 

NEW HOMES UNDER IRRIGATION. 



Effect of the Irrigation Movement on Eastern Land 
and Industrial Institutions. 



Some of the sociological factors in the national 
irrigation movement was the theme of an address last 
week before the Philadelphia Congress of the Amer- 
ican Association for the Advancement of Science, by 
Guy E. Mitchell, an extensive writer on irrigation 
and public land subjects. 

No question before the public to-day, Mr. Mitchell 
declared, presents more interesting sociological phases 
than does the national irrigation question in America, 
not only through the great number of homes to be 
created by artificially watering desert wastes but 
through the far-reaching effect of the working out 
of a great government irrigation policy and the gen- 
eral education of the American people on the advan- 
tages of this practice both east and west. 

The social side of irrigation can be described in 
a single clause. Irrigation subdivides and resubdivides 
land into small home tracts. 

Irrigated communities average the smallest farms in 
the world. The west contains thousands of five and 
ten acre farms from which men are making com- 
fortable livings. The social conditions of some of 
the most intensely irrigated tracts are perhaps the 
most nearly perfect of those of any communities in 
the world. 



Education to Eastern Farmers. 

Now the effect of the great government irrigation 
works, which are being pushed rapidly forward, will be 
to create a western empire of new homes and at the 
same time to incidentally thoroughly educate the peo- 
ple of the entire country on the subject of irrigation. 
The consequence will be that irrigation practices will 
finally enthrall the eastern farmer. The facts as they 
exist in European countries show that irrigation can be 
practiced with great profit on land which has suf- 
ficient rainfall to grow paying crops. Irrigation is 
a crop insurer besides guaranteeing double yields and 
when it is applied to eastern farm lands the result will 
be to divide them into smaller and better tilled tracts. 

A Nation of Rural Homes. 

Along with the prosecution of the government ir- 
rigation policy and its great agricultural education 
will then come the establishment of rural colonies 
throughout the entire country and a vastly improved 
agricultural and social condition. 

♦ ■♦ * 

A BEAUTIFUL PRAYER. 



The fishermen of Brittany, so we are told, are wont 
to utter this simple prayer when they launch their boats 
upon the deep : " Keep me, my God ; my boat is so 
small, and thy ocean is so wide." How touchingly 
beautiful the words and the thought ! How wise and 
appropriate the prayer! ]\Iight not the same petition 
be uttered with the same directness by us every day of 
our lives ? " Keep me, my God ; my boat is so small," 
— I am so weak, so helpless, so easily carried by the 
winds and tossed by the waves. " And thy ocean 
is so wide," — the perils are so many, the rocks so 
frequent, the current of temptation so resistless, the 
tides of evil so treacherous, the icy mountains of dis- 
aster so threatening, that, except thou, the Lord, dost 
keep me, I must utterly perish. Keep me, my God, 
keep me; my boat is so small, and thy winds are so 
fierce, thy waves are so high, thy waters are so deep, 
thy ocean is so wide, I am so buflfeted about by sharp 
adversity, so driven before the storms of grief, so .swept 
by the resistless eurocyldon of defeat — keep me, my 
God, keep me ! — Selected. 

♦ ♦ 4> 

" Refinement is more a spirit than it is an accom- 
plishment. All the books of etiquette that have been 
written can not make a person refined. True refine- 
ment springs from a gentle, unselfish heart. With- 
out a refined spirit a refined life is impossible." 

♦ ♦ * 

" The infidel's child would not write: ' God is no- 
w^here,' as he had tried to teach her ; but ' God is now 
here ' was the way in which she wrote it." 



152 



THE I NGLENOOK.— February 14, 1905. 



PLEASANT STORIES OF PLEASANT PEOPLE. 



BY MARGUERITE BIXLER. 



Liszt, the musician, had a wonderful personahty. 
One writer has said : " If you only heard Liszt play, 
and didn't see him, you lost half the pleasure." An 
amusing incident is told of him, as a teacher. A 
young Magyar tried to play a sonato of Beethoven 
before him one day. 

" Piano, piano," cried Liszt. " Piano, softly ! Let 
it sing — let it sing! Can't you see piano written 
there?" cried he, still more sharply, but the young 
patriot only grew more nervous and played the 
heavier. 

At last Liszt took his hands from the keys, saying, 
half -angrily, half-laughing: 

" Do you know, my young friend, what the field 
sergeant does when the recruits can not tell the dif- 
ference between right and left? He ties a bundle of 
straw on their right arms and a bundle of hay on their 
left, and -gives the command: 'Hay, straw!' We 
shall have to try this plan with you for 'piano' and 
' forte ' ! Now, then, give old Beethoven a chance. 
Hay ! hay ! ha}- ! well ! Now, straw, straw ! plenty of 
straw — still more straw," and Liszt laughed till the 
tears came. 

* 

In the Youth's Companion there is a pretty story 
of Queen Victoria and Jenny Lind. It belongs to the 
year 1848, and shows how the modesty of the two 
women — the queen of England and the queen of song 
— made a momentary awkwardness which the gentle 
tact of the singer overcame. 

It was on a night when Jenny Lind was to sing 
at her majesty's theatre that the queen made her ap- 
pearance after the memorable Chartist day. For the 
great artist, too, this was a first appearance, for it was 
the beginning of her season at a place where the year 
before she had won unparalleled fame. It happened 
that the queen entered the royal box at the same time 
that the prima donna stepped upon the stage. In- 
stantly a tumult of acclamation burst from every 
corner of the theatre. Jenny Lind modestly retired 
to the back of the stage, waiting till the demonstration 
of loyalty to the sovereign should subside. 

The queen, refusing to appropriate to herself that 
which she thought to be intended for the artist, made 
no acknowledgment. The cheering continued, in- 
creased, grew overwhelming, and still there was no 
acknowledgment, either from the stage or the royal 
box. 

At length, when the situation became embarrassing, 
Jennie Lind, with ready tact, ran forward to the foot- 
lights and sung, " God Save the Queen," which was 
caught up at the end of the solo by the orchestra, 



chorus and audience. The queen then came to the 
front of her box and bowed, and the opera was re- 
sumed. 

* 

When Patti was a little girl she went to school in 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. She was so fond of music even 
then that she used the school piano so much that com- 
plaints were made to the school trustees that "the 
little Italian girl " played the piano so much that no 
other children could get a chance. She had a sister, 
Carlotta, who was a beautiful singer too. 

Patti was a very good-natured, big-hearted little 
girl, and full of sympathy for anybody who was in 
trouble. But she grew very angry once, when some 
of the bad boys annoyed her by calling out to her, 
" Patty-cake, patty-cake, baker's man," etc. She 
turned and faced them, pouring out her wrath in pure 
Italian. Nobody knew what she said; but the boys 
turned pale with surprise and fright to hear her, and 
never called her that again. 

She was a brave little girl. Once when she was 
playing with the other children near a pool, one of 
the little girls slipped and fell into the water. Patti 
kept her presence of mind perfectly. She sprang in- 
to the water, caught the struggling girl, and swam to 
a log where they clung together until they were res- 
cued. 

One day one of my pupils, a young English lady, 
showed me a piece of money that she said was once 
in Patti's packet! When a little girl she heard Patti 
sing in England, and was so delighted with the music 
that she went up to Patti and said : " How can you 
sing so nice, lady ? " Madam Patti put her arm 
around her, reached in her packet, and gave her the 
souvenir. 

♦ ♦ 4> 

NEWS ON TRAINS. 



There are some things so simple that when they 
are first put into efifect people are quite apt to ask 
" Why did not some one think of this before ? " Big 
money has more than once been made from inventions 
so " easy " that it would seem as if a hundred persons 
might have thought of them at the same time. 

So we are tempted to ask, when advised that the 
Union Pacific railroad has introduced a new service 
on its overland trains, " Why haven't railroads done 
this before ? " Probably because none of their bright 
men happened to think of the idea, we suppose. It 
remained for the advertising department of the Union 
Pacific to work this out, as they have worked out 
many others. 

The scheme is practically this : 

About noon and at half past four every afternoon, 
there is flashed over the wires of the Union Pacific 
system, a brief summary of the most important tele- 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 14, 1905. 



153 



graphic news of the day, news from all parts of the 
world. This is handed over by operators at scheduled 
points, in typewriter form, to the conductors of the 
Overland, who post the sheets in the buflfet, smoking 
and library cars. 

Those who have taken the journey to the Pacific 
Coast know how hungry a man gets for news, and how 
hard it is to appease that appetite when passing 
through a country where large newspapers are not 
published such as can be procured at off intervals, 
giving only the most meager telegrams. One feels 
quite cut off from the world for the time being, and 
often arrives at his destination two or three days be- 
hind the times, as far as up-to-date information is 
concerned. The " news service bulletin " of this en- 
terprising road will be a boon to those who wish to 
keep in touch with the swing of the world's pendulum, 
the tide of affairs that goes on while they travel, and 
we believe the traveling public will be quick to recog- 
nize tlie utility and value of this innovation, and show 
their appreciation by using the line that adopts it. 

We have had for some years the dining car, the 
traveling barber shop, the stenographer who takes 
dictation while going at sixty miles an hour, and other 
facilities to the advantage of the modern traveler, all 
tending to his comfort, but this is the first attempt 
to supply him with news without charge. Who knows 
but that in the future every fast train will be equipped 
with a printing office and turn out a small daily paper? 
It may come along about the time that, as we fly we 
shall be able to communicate from our own section 
or drawing-room by telephone with our families at 
home. 

The expense attaching to this new service is not 
great — the Union Pacific using its own wires and its 
own employes, but it is certainly a great convenience. 
The new scheme will be inaugurated at once. 

It should not be forgotten that the Union Pacific 
was the first line to introduce dining cars, vestibuled 
cars, steam heat, Pintsch light, buffet smoking and 
library cars, tourist cars, on Trans-Continental trains 
west of the Missouri River, and still continues to lead. 
—The Omaha Excelsior, Oct. i, IP04. 
4> 4> ♦ 
ORIGIN OF STRAWBERRIES. 



Until recently nothing definite was known about 
the origin of the cultivated strawberry, but it has been 
ascertained that its progenitor was a plant found in 
Chile and fetched from that country to Europe. This 
plant was known as the " pine " strawberry, because 
of its agreeable pineapple-like smell. Up to that time 
the garden strawberries had been derived from the 
scarlet berry of Eastern North America, but the 
" pine " species was so superior as to supplant the 
other. 



The Government Plant Bureau states that during 
early colonial days the wild strawberries of the field 
were abundant in this country, and furnished a much- 
prized article of diet. When transplanted to the gar- 
tlen they gave fruits of increased size, but 
only a few commercial varieties resulted. From Vir- 
ginia they were taken to Europe, where they were 
cultivated to a considerable extent until the " pine " 
from Chile, made its appearance. 

It is now known that the " pine " strawberry is 
native to the western mountain regions of both North 
and South America. It may correctly be called the 
parent of the modern strawberry, though some of the 
best of the garden varieties of to-day have been ob- 
tained by crossing the " pine " with the eastern scarlet 
berry. At all events, the modern strawberry is dis- 
tinctively an American product — a gift of the New 
World to mankind, like Indian corn, the potato, the 
tobacco plant and the kidney bean. 

Our Eastern strawberry reached Europe about 1712, 
and the " pine " from Chile became known there in 
1760. There is a native European wild strawberry 
which has the advantage of bearing fruit all through 
the summer, but it is inferior. The garden strawberry, 
as we know it at the present time, adapts itself to a 
wider range of latitude and to greater extremes in 
environment than any other cultivated fruit. With- 
in the last twenty-five years its size has been greatly 
increased so that nowadays occasional berries will 
afford two or three mouthfuls apiece. New varieties 
are continually being obtained from propagation from 
seed, while the desirable horticultural sorts thus se- 
cured are propagated from the runners, their qualities 
being in this way perpetuated with certainty. 

♦ ♦ •J' 

There never was so great a thought laboring in 
the breasts of men as now. It almost seems as if what 
was aforetime spoken fabulously and hieroglyphic- 
ally, was now spoken plainly, the doctrine, namely 
ot the indwelling of the Creator in man. What is 
the scholar, what is the man for, but for hospitality 
for every new thought of his time ? Have you leisure, 
power, property, friends ? You shall be the asylum and 
patron of every new thought, every unproven opinion, 
every untried project which proceeds out of good 
will and honest seeeking. All the newspapers, all the 
tong'ies of to-day will of course defame what is noble, 
but you who hold not of to-day, not of the times, but 
of the Everlasting, are to stand for it ; and the highest 
compliment ever received from Heaven is the send- 
ing to him its disguise and discredited angels." 
— Emerson. 

* 4> * 

" Ignorance is a prolonged infancy, only deprived 
of its charm." 



154 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 14, 1905. 



WHAT DO YOU READ ? 



BY LOTTIE M. BOLLINGER. 



Friends, if I should ask you what you read, some 
might say the Bible, more would enumerate a list of 
books, magazines, newspapers, etc. Now, why is this 
so? Simply because too many of us read everything 
else to the exclusion of the Bible, while we should 
read the Bible to the exclusion of everything else, if 
necessary, for it is through it that we learn how to live. 

But some say we go to church and hear it read. 
This may be so, but that is seldom more than a few 
verses or at most a chapter, once or twice a week, and 
although Bro. A or B may be thoroughly honest and 
conscientious in his endeavor to lead you aright, how- 
do you know but that he may make a mistake? 

How often we hear the remark : " I don't believe 
that way," after some sermon preached by Bro. A, or 
" Bro. B said it was this way," yet no endeavor is 
made to read the Bible and find out which one was 
right, if either. 

If you ask those same people what they do believe, 
if they tell you and you ask the reason for such be- 
lief, quite often it is based upon another's remarks, 
or views, and seldom are you sent to the Bible for 
proof. 

Are you willing to leave your soul's welfare to the 
guidance of one frail mortal without any endeavor on 
your part to distinguish right from wrong as given 
in the Holy Book 

Many do this who are unwilling to leave the tem- 
poral things of this life in the care of others for fear 
of neglect or loss, and would be unwilling to intrust 
the entire care and training of their little children to 
Bro. A or B, yet they go on day after day neglecting 
to read or study the one and only book which gives 
them divine instruction, and shifts the responsibility 
upon the brother's shoulders. 

Many make excuses, some say they haven't any 
Bible to read, but spend in a very short time in un- 
necessary articles, enough money to buy a Bible a 
dozen times. 

Some say the print of their Bible is so fine that 
they can't see to read it, yet they will spend hours 
reading a dime novel or a magazine with much finer 
print. 

Others say they haven't time, yet they can find time 
to go on the excursions, attend socials, parties, fairs, 
shows, picnics, go fishing or hunting, or any other 
temporal amusement they wish and then no time for 
the Master. 

Now, did you ever think how frail and without 
truth or foundation these excuses are, and do you 
suppose at '■he final examination on the last day that 
God will taJcfc them and overlook the many errors com- 



mitted through ignorance caused by willful blindness 
and neglect to study God's Word? 

We are told to search the Scriptures for the pur- 
pose of preparing ourselves for eternal life in that 
l:etter home beyond, and if we fail through lack of 
understanding when we did our best perhaps there 
may be some excuse for us, but we cannot shift our 
responsibility upon another's shoulders, for each of 
us will have to account for himself and himself alone, 
unless our influence has been such as would lead oth- 
ers astray. So let us all endeavor to lay away our 
petty excuses and spend some time each day with God 
and his Word, so that we may feed our soul with 
sf)iritual food, the same as our bodies with temporal 
food, so that we may lead such lives as to be an ex- 
ample and an uplifting influence to those round about 
us. 

Vestahurg, Mich. 

♦ * ♦ 

NATURE AND HER GOD. 



BY MARY I. SENSEMAN. 

God is a Spirit and he has given it to Nature to 
have dominion over the earth and sun and moon 
and stars, and over the living things of the water and 
of the air. , 

The laws of the universe are inexorable, immutable, 
unwritten, — the laws of Nature. They pertain to 
all things material, all things which man's mentality is 
able to perceive. 

These laws are unwritten except as men and women 
have jotted down many of them in their works on 
science. They are immutable, as we see in the regular 
succession of night and day and of the seasons, in 
the germination and development of plant and animal 
life, and in the unvarying cellular arrangement of each 
kind of substance. They are inexorable, as, supposing 
that the sun, taking compassion on shivering mortals, 
were to throw out an extra amount of heat some win- 
ter's day, the natural result would be that the sun 
would get to shine a few years less than it will other- 
wise ; a plant, if kept from the sunlight, will die ; 
disobedience to the laws of health result in bodily 
or mental disease ; or, to illustrate more positively, 
a child who eats strychnine tablets in mistake for 
candy will suffer as much from the poison as a man 
using the tablets purposely. 

The law of God is inexorable, immutable, written, 
— the Bible. It pertains to all things spiritual. One 
way in which this dififers from Nature's laws is that 
it judges. It distinguishes motive of act from the 
act. It distinguishes the conditions of body and mind 
which counteract spiritual strength. Thus, a person 
inculpably ignorant will not be punished for viola- 
tion of the law of God. On the other hand, inevitable 



THE INGLENOOK.— Fchiuaiy 14. iw 15. 



'D? 



punishment will follow the slightest violation of the 
laws of Nature. And this is why: Nature is to Clod 
as a perfect machine is to the mind of the man who 
made it. 

The law of God, too, is immutable. If this old world 
were to go to sleep to-night and forget to turn us 
toward the sun to-morrow morning, vast surprise 
would thrill everybody. Can Christ's law, " Accept 
me, ye whom I have asked individually," be expected 
to be wavering? 

Men's bodies and minds are governed by the natural 
laws ; their spirits, by the divine. So if we are spend- 
ing all our energy to obtain bodily and mental de- 
velopment we are worshiping Nature — a machine — 
a servant of him who created all matter. If we give 
our energy first to a life of love and the remainder to 
health and development of mind and body we are 
worshiping the Omnipotent. 

We are always seeking God in Nature, — in knowl- 
edge and science of the height and depth of the 
universe. \\"e forget that he is not in the wind, nor 
in the earthquake, nor in the fire, but in the still small 
voice. We forget that the nearest we can get to God 
is in faith and the nearest we can get like him is in 
works. 

Cozington, Ohio, Rural Route No. j. 

4> •!> ♦ 
HOW MOLES WORK. 



ST. VALENTINE'S DAY. 



i;y Ai)i;i..\inL? mckek koons. 



Moles are usually actively at work in the early 
morning or late in the afternoon. It is not difficult 
to kill them with a pitchfork when they are working, 
the animals being located by observing the movement 
of the ground above them. If water is allowed to 
run into the burrow and fill it the animal when present 
can be forced to come to the surface to avoid drown- 
ing, and may be easily killed. The best remedjf for 
the damage done to lawns and grass plots b}' moles 
is prompt rolling with a heavy roller. By continued 
repetition of this the moles will be driven away at 
least temporarily. 

Moles have few natural enemies. Their food con- 
sists chiefly of earthworms and insects that live in the 
ground, and their presence in large numbers at any 
place is an evidence of the abundance of their food. 
There is no doubt that they do much good by destroy- 
ing many noxious insects. If it were not for the in- 
jury done to lawns by their throwing up ridges of 
earth along w-hich the grass dies, or to gardens by their 
loosening the roots of young plants, moles would be 
more beneficial than harmful. 

♦ * ♦ 

" Who of our youth will give themselves to God for 
the purpose of laboring for the salvation of their fel- 
low vouth ? " 



St. V.\lentine's D.w is one of those customs about 
which we are supposed to be so well informed, that 
dictionaries and other books of reference can aflford 
to slight it, or pass it by with only the merest men- 
tion, but the fact is, nobody, not even the compilers 
of such books of reference, knows very much about it, 
beyond the old fancy that birds are supposed to mate 
on the 14th of February, and we all know that mil- 
lions of love letters and valentines, both sentimental 
and " comic " are posted on that day. 

Valentine's Day Luncheons and " Heart Parties," 
are also favorite ways of celebrating this degenerate 
festival of love, and certain widely read magazines 
teem during the month of February, with suggestions 
of how to celebrate the day fittingly, but the real mean- 
ing of St. Valentine's Day, somehow seems to escape 
us, busy with the affairs of an intensely practical age. 
Besides, we have neither time nor imagination to write 
verses to our mistress' eyebrow, and if we did, she 
would receive them with open amusement, and " die- 
a-laughing " as she read. 

The origin of St. Valentine's Day is really obscure, 
like so many of the traditional observances that have 
come down to us. One theory is that it was originally 
the feast of Lupercalia, a Roman Festival in honor of 
Pan and Juno, which took place in February, at which 
time young men and maidens' names were put into 
vases and drawn by the opposite sex, for partners dur- 
ing the feast, which we are told sometimes ended in 
an orgy. The drawing of names in like manner, was 
a very distinctive feature of the English and Scotch 
celebration of St. Valentine's Day. 

The early Christian Fathers, with unflagging zeal, 
tried to stamp out this pagan festival of Lupercalia, 
but found that they could not erase it from the te- 
nacious minds of the common people, and they then 
did the best they could to transform it into a Chris- 
tian festival. They gave it a new name arid selected 
the good Bishop Valentine, who was martyred on the 
14th of February, 270 A. D. during the Claudian per- 
secutions, to stand godfather to the change. 

In fact, there were really two St. A/'alentines, both 
martyrs, both having been done to death by persecu- 
tion, on the 14th of February, but the good Fathers 
seem to have chosen the Bishop St. \^alentine as their 
patron saint, and' so will we. 

St. Valentine's Day found its way into England and 
Scotland, and flourished there. Some one tells us that 
this custom of exchanging love messages, exists " sole- 
ly among English-speaking people," but I think this is 
going a little outside of the facts, as tradition tells us 
how it was celebrated in Norwich, Eng., where bas- 
kets of flowers, cakes, and other substantial dainties 



156 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 14, 1905. 



were mysteriously left on doorsteps, and in France, 
where for awhile the names of saints were substituted 
for the names of sweethearts, and the drawers were 
supposed to emulate in their conduct, the qualities and 
virtues of the saint which happened to be their valen- 
tine. No doubt there were as many different ways of 
celebrating it as there were countries and parishes. 

The common practice was for the lads and lasses 
to meet on St. Valentine's Day, and each writing their 
name on a billet, place it in a receptacle, from which 
it was drawn by one of the opposite sex, who thus 
secured a valentine or partner. In some cases, there 
were two valentines for each one. There was an ele- 
ment of fun in it, as well as an element of chance, 
and we are told that " quite often, a real love affair " 
resulted. The valentines thus mated were supposed 
to devote themselves to one another for varying pe- 
riods, in some cases for a whole year. There must 
have been an aching heart now and then, when some 
impetuous " young Lochinvar " was allotted to the 
wrong girl, and what was done under these circum- 
stances, we are not told. Perhaps a certain amount of 
" switching " was permitted, or Cupid may have been 
wise enough to avoid such mistakes. Doubtless he 
gave many a sly hint to those who needed his services 
and knew enough to profit by them. 

It was believed that the first unmarried person of 
the other sex, whom one met on the morning of St. 
Valentine's Day, would be one's true love, perhaps be- 
come a husband or wife. So one girl tells us : " Last 
Friday (1750) was St. Valentine's day, and the night 
before I got five bay-leaves, and pinned four of them 
to the four corners of my pillow, and the fifth to the 
middle, and then, if I dreamed of my sweetheart, Betty 
said we should be married before the year was out. 
But to make more sure, I boiled an egg hard, and took 
out the yolk and filled it with salt, and then I went 
to bed, ate it shell and all, without speaking or drink- 
ing after it. We also wrote our lovers' names upon 
bits of paper and rolled them up in clay and put them 
into water, and the first that rose up was to be our 
valentine. Would you think it? — Mr. Blossom was 
my man. I lay abed and shut my eyes all the morn- 
ing till he came to our house, for I would not have 
seen another man before him, for all the world." 

The poets of Shakespeare's time made many al- 
lusions to this festival, the most familiar to us being, 
perhaps, Ophelia's little song, in Hamlet, which be- 
gins,— 

" To-morrow is St. Valentine, 
All in the morning betime. 
And I a maid at your window, 
To be your valentine." 

There are many allusions to the popular belief that 
the birds mated on that day, and the following is one 
of the quaintest: 



"Hail, Bishop Valentine, whose day this: 
All the air is thy diocese. 
And all the chirping choristers 
And other birds are thy parishioners. 
Thou marryest every year, 

The lyric lark, and the grave whispering dove, 
The sparrow that neglects his life for love. 
The household bird with the red stomacher; 
Thou makest the blackbird speed as soon. 
As doth the gold finch or the halycon — 
This day more cheerfully than ever shine. 
This day, which might inflame thyself, old Valentine." 

— Donne. 

For common folk, less favored than poets in imag- 
inative qualities, there were little chap-books or pam- 
phlets, printed and sold by the booksellers, which were 
called " Valentine Writers," some sentimental, some of 
a witty trend, and which contained all sorts of jingles, 
relative to the subject. These, one could copy upon 
a sheet of fancy paper, with the aid of a goose-quill, 
and slip between the door and lintel of the beloved one 
on St. Valentine morning. On the back of one of 
these chap-books, called " The Quizzing Valentine 
Writer," (Published in 1805) is a portrait of a maid- 
en in an enormous coal-scuttle bonnet, who is repuls- 
ing a dandy of the most exaggerated type, with the 
words : 

" Oh go, you little harmless thing, 
■ A dandy, all so fine, 
The gods I hope a man will bring. 
To be my Valentine." 

By which we can conclude, that if our grandmothers 
" fed on sentiment," as they are accused of doing, 
they occasionally seasoned it with a little common 
sense. 

We learn from Pepy's Dairy (1661) that the com- 
plement of being selected as a valentine (whether by 
lot, or open choice) called for a gift, more or less sub- 
stantial, and he tells us how he gave his wife, upon 
different St. Valentine's Days, " a payre of embroid- 
ered and six payre of plain white gloves," and a " ring 
set with a Turkey stone surrounded with diamonds," 
which must have cost him " a pretty penny," as he 
should express it. 

Charles, Duke of Orleans, who was taken prisoner 
at the Battle of Agincourt, in 141 5, and detained in the 
Tower of London for twenty-five years, beguiled the 
time by writing many valentines, of which the follow- 
ing has real literary excellence : 

"Wilt thou be mine? dear love, reply, — 
Sweetly consent, or else deny; 
Whisper softly, none shall know — 
Wilt thou be mine, love? ay or no? 

" Spite of fortune, we may be 
Happy by one word from thee; 
Life flies swiftly — ere it go. 
Wilt thou be mine, love, ay or no?" 



THE INGLENOOK.— February 14, 1905. 



157 



It has been only since 1800 that manufactured val- 
•entincs have been used. The first manufactured val- 
entine in America was made b\' a woman, in the early 
part of the nineteenth century. Her father was a 
stationer and lived at Worcester, Mass. Miss Esther 
A. Howland, for that was her name, saw some printed 
valentines which her father had ordered from Eng- 
land, and thought she could make sonie that would 
be prettier than those. She luade a few and gave 
them to her brother, to take with him on his next 
trip " on the road." He surprised her by bringing 
back overwhelming orders for $5,000 worth of valen- 
tines. She filled the orders, somehow, making use of 
fancy paper, gilt paper, small pictures, paper flowers, 
etc., and eventually became rich out of this business. 

One of the old manufacturers tells how he " bought a 
•quantity of beautifully made, artificial cambric roses, 
each no larger than a pea, but so perfectly formed that 
each separate petal was true to nature." And who was 
it, think you, who made these beautiful trifles to adorn 
valentines which were to gladden the hearts of all 
true lovers? They were made in French convents, by 
nuns, women who had renounced forever all thought 
of earthly lov& — who made no marriage except when 
they became the brides of heaven. 

Though our ancestors played at love, and with love, 
delighting in much extravagance of sentiment, and 
doubtless inscribing many witty and quizzical verses to 
-their valentines, never, never, was the " comic " valen- 
tine known. It had no place in their imaginations, but 
remained for this age to call it forth from the realms 
•of hob-goblins and shadows, where it has lurked, 
doubtless, evading the light, as all distorted growths 
do. For a " comic " valentine is a monstrosity, a para- 
dox. Dr. Samuel Johnson defines a valentine as " a 
missive sent to a sweetheart by another sweetheart." 
Broadly defined, a valentine is a token, a message, of 
love, tenderness, affection, and good-will — but where 
is the love and where is the good-will in a " comic " 
valentine? That is why I say it is a paradox — love 
concealing an insult — respect shielding a blow. 

The widespread custom of sending valentines is due 
to and dependent upon the highly developed mail serv- 
ice of the present day, with which a paternal govern- 
ment has provided us, and by the way, it is, it can 
be, for every one of us, St. Valentine's Day all the 
year round, not only on the 14th of February, but 
every day in the year. 

We can send, if we wish, it, a message every day, 
to some absent friend, who is toiling along under a 
burden all the heavier, because it is borne in silence, 
without a word of encouragement. Suppose we say 
that word of encouragement, send them a valentine, 
a message of love and kindness, a whispered word of 
■tenderness to uplift them when they falter — who has 
not known the real, physical power which sympathy 



can exert upon our minds and bodies — then will that 
not be a valentine, the very best kind of a valentine 
in all the world? 

Then indeed will the name and meaning of St. Val- 
entine's Day be more a siiadow of a by-gone day, then 
indeed will the good Bisiiop Valentine feel that he has. 
not stood godfather to the festival, through all these 
centuries, in vain. " .And so, good-morrow, Valen- 
tine." 

Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 

* ♦ 4> 

AGRICULTURE SLIGHTED. 



The national platforms of all the political parties 
may be read without finding any particular reference to 
agriculture. Are there no farmers in America ? Who